Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > 12-12-12 Wee Heavy Recipe Formulation
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-28-2011, 02:27 PM   #21
smokinghole
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smokinghole's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lucid Dream Land
Posts: 2,917
Liked 125 Times on 102 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

I have to pick up a couple examples to refresh my memory. I want to pick up some Skullsplitter if I can get it along with Traquair House. Only bad thing is I'm in PA and finding single bottles is a pain and I pay a premium for singles of most anything.


__________________
Going through life is hard.
Going through life stupid is harder.
smokinghole is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:44 PM   #22
KingBrianI
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 3,491
Liked 92 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I guess I'll go ahead and weigh in on the subject. Like azscoob and others have mentioned, keeping the grainbill simple is also my suggestion. I'd really like a Golden Promise base with a touch of roasted or black barley for color. I'm even thinking about a little british crystal malt to help fill out the flavors even more. Definitely a big kettle caramelization, though I may do more than 2 gallons of the first runnings, and I'll try to reduce it down to a thick syrup. I'd also not want to go crazy with the ABV. An OG somewhere between 1.100 and 1.110 should get around 10% ABV depending upon FG. For hops I'd want to go with something Britishy, Northern Brewer, Northdown, Target, EKG, etc. I'd definitely go with either the wyeast or white labs scottish ale yeasts. As for smoked malt, I think I would leave it out. And barrel or oak aging would be good. It's been a while since I researched Traquair House Ale, but I believe they mash or ferment in a wooden vessel. The oak definitely makes itself apparent in that beer. And since I think that beer is sublime, I wouldn't be against aging on oak or barrels for the 12/12/12.

Wow, that was a disjointed post. Anyway, those are my preliminary thoughts.


__________________
I'm too lazy and have too many beers going to keep updating this!
KingBrianI is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 02:53 PM   #23
Steelers77
Vendor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Steelers77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Janesville, WI
Posts: 2,076
Liked 68 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Brian,
Would you take the first runnings gallons down to about 1/2-3/4 of a gallon? I've done that in the past with great success and think it would be great in this beer.
__________________
Pearl Malt is back in stock!

Get your hops, 85 varieties starting at $.75/oz!

Accuflex Bev Seal Ultra in stock now!

Farmhousebrewingsupply.com

http://farmhousebrewingsupply.com

https://www.facebook.com/Farmhousebrewingsupply

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Farmhousebrew
Steelers77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 03:04 PM   #24
azscoob
Brewpub coming soon!
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
azscoob's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Lake in the Hills, IL
Posts: 7,546
Liked 243 Times on 192 Posts
Likes Given: 233

Default

I made a big red a while back, on a 10 gallon batch I caramelized just under 2 gallons down to just over 1 pint.

It turned out really well, good depth and complexity that I attribute to the caramelization.
__________________
Shirts n Steins: Grain Reaper Brewing
azscoob is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 03:05 PM   #25
KingBrianI
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 3,491
Liked 92 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steelers77 View Post
Brian,
Would you take the first runnings gallons down to about 1/2-3/4 of a gallon? I've done that in the past with great success and think it would be great in this beer.
I wouldn't go by volume but by consistency. I've done kettle caramelization several times in the past and I've found it very hard to estimate what the volume of the molten hot syrup is at the end of the caramelization. I just take it to the thick syrupy consistency I'm shooting for. I have found that when it isn't boiled down enough, the flavors and color from it arent nearly as strong as when it is boiled down really thick.
__________________
I'm too lazy and have too many beers going to keep updating this!
KingBrianI is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 03:44 PM   #26
smokinghole
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smokinghole's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lucid Dream Land
Posts: 2,917
Liked 125 Times on 102 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

I like boiling until the spoon I'm using to stir has drops drying on it before they can fall off. Then I take the pot back to my main boil and dissolve it with hot wort back into the main kettle. If it doesn't drip off the spoon I figure I'm pretty much there. It is very close to burning at that point though so you have to be careful.
__________________
Going through life is hard.
Going through life stupid is harder.
smokinghole is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 04:06 PM   #27
statseeker
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 476
Liked 15 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I think this one is going to be a sort of "your mileage may vary" type of brew for most of us. As long as we can agree on the base type, the hop type, the gravity and the process, I think we're pretty much there.

Base, let's mostly agree, Maris Otter.

Hops, British. Target, NB, EKG.

Yeast: English or Scotch (whichever the brewer wants, from US-04 to White Labs British to Wyeast 1724)

OG: 1.090 - 1.110

Process: Caramelize 2 gallons first runnings. Boil 2-ish hours. Hop addition times are brewers choice.

Can we agree on that?
__________________
For new brewers, especially new all-grain brewers: Check out my blog The New Brewer Chronicals: brewerchronicals.blogspot.com
statseeker is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 04:41 PM   #28
BenS
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 953
Liked 28 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
I do believe smoke malt is part of the style and you just can't get the same result from the yeast.
The slight smoke that a lot of people experience while drinking this beer does not come from smoke malt. Strong Scottish Ale is typically fermented on the cool end (60-62F) because of the originating country (think about how warm Scotland gets). The smokiness that people taste is actually phenols that the yeast produce at those low temps. Yeast selection is key to an excellent strong scotch ale.
BenS is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 05:19 PM   #29
bottlebomber
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ukiah, CA
Posts: 14,326
Liked 2716 Times on 2101 Posts
Likes Given: 372

Default

I want in on this, but I've never done a swap before. What's involved? I like all the ideas going out so far. I would probably opt for at least 4-8 ounces of cherry smoked malt but I guess we can hash that out later.
bottlebomber is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2011, 09:08 PM   #30
bierhaus15
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: , New York
Posts: 1,527
Liked 92 Times on 63 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

If someone wants to use Traquair House's ale as a template, the recipe is basically 99% Pale, 1% Roasted Barley, EKG or NB hops, and some kettle carmelization that occurs over the course of their two-hour boil. They ferment in oak barrels for 3-5 days and the oak they use is very old memel (prussia/lithuania). Therefore, any oak character you may perceive is not from wood itself. Aside, the jacobite ale has coriander in it.

Smoked malt is not something I like in my Scottish ales and I will be keeping it out. Same with 'oak' in the sense of aging. Mashing, boiling, and fermentation should give us all the intricate flavors we are looking for.


bierhaus15 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Recipe Formulation (come laugh at me!) bjl110 Recipes/Ingredients 14 08-03-2011 04:43 AM
Recipe formulation Pale ale xjncoguyx Recipes/Ingredients 17 05-12-2010 02:45 AM
First recipe formulation - IPA TheTower Recipes/Ingredients 7 03-06-2009 01:59 PM
help with first recipe formulation - RIS kcinpdx Recipes/Ingredients 3 01-19-2009 01:37 AM
Recipe Formulation Panagiotis Recipes/Ingredients 2 10-27-2008 06:34 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS