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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Kombucha & Fermented Tea Forum > Home brewer Sauerkraut?
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Old 01-26-2012, 01:08 PM   #31
jamiesavoie
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I just finished fermenting a batch of kraut and sour beets and kimchi. It's my first time trying kimchi and so far I'm not disapointed!

One tip I can give is try to ferment at lower temp, I do mine in my basment. It makes it sweeter


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Old 01-29-2012, 03:59 AM   #32
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+1 on the kimchi! Anyone have thoughts on reusing the brine from leftover sauerkraut/kimchi? I've found that just by throwing the dregs of the last batch I did into the new batch, the flavor has become more complex. I'm several generations in, it is soooo tasty!


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Old 02-26-2012, 12:54 AM   #33
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Default Kraut making

My father used to make it when I was a kid. Always in a larger crock 10-15 gal. He had an old wooden slicer (3 blade) , used only Kosher salt, smashed the layers down with big maple tamper and covered it with a piece of cheese cloth. This was held down with a large flat rock. I remember him boiling the rock to keep it clean. He would peel off and replace the cheese cloth weekly to remove the funk on top. Can't remember how many weeks it would be in there, but the cellar really smelled. When it was done it was canned in Ball jars with the glass tops and with the flip lids.
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Old 08-21-2012, 06:31 PM   #34
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I've been making sauerkraut for about six months now. I have two 10L Harsch crocks. Those work perfectly. I mix up cabbage, carrots, onions, celtic sea salt, and whey from raw milk kefir. I pound it with a wooden kraut pounder. I start filling the crock, having left some juice from the previous batch in place also. Then I put in some cucumbers, beets, turnips, radishes, garlic, ginger or whatever I was able to find for that batch. Then I cover those with the rest of the kraut. Turnips work the best, amazing flavor in the kraut. Leeks come out absolutely amazing. I normally get organic produce when possible. The leeks I just leave the roots on and it's interesting when it comes out the roots have grown about six inches.

Also I put in black peppercorns, white peppercorns, hawthorne berries, juniper berries, coriander, and a few other herbs.

In those Harsch crocks, after 4 weeks at 70F it is perfect, just slightly underdone and ready for a little more cool temperature aging. I can it up in quart jars and refrigerate to let it age a little more.
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Old 08-30-2012, 04:48 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CreamyGoodness View Post
For what it is worth, can I mention that fermenting saur kraut and dill pickles is what got me into home brewing in the first place? Cooking is a gateway drug to drinkin' ;-).
This is so true. I'm really into cooking, and especially experimental cooking. I enjoy being in the kitchen... the swmbo... sadly not so much these at all. More food for me! But yeah, pickling things definetly got me into brewing too. Maybe its because I need a good beer along with my pickled eggs.

Oh, and saurkraut is awesome. Turns out I found a traditional kraut crock in perfect condition in my mums garage - but without the weights. I'm gonna try a batch when I get a chance and I'll be sure to post pics.
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Old 09-10-2012, 10:15 PM   #36
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Does anyone add a brine after pounding cabbage. I bought cabbage at store and forgot to add brine because it did not produce much liquid after pounding. I added apples for the first time and let sit 4 weeks In harsh crock. It was RANCID smelling. The 2 other times I made it I had great results. But that was in Canada. Was it the lack of brine or the 75+ degree fermenting temp or both? Does anyone make sauerkraut in the south ( Houston)? Ooh well going to try again.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:31 AM   #37
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Yes, I almost always add brine even after pounding the heck out of the cabbage. I think because I include onions, carrots, turnips, leeks, etc., I need more brine than normal. The extra brine is VALUABLE when putting the kraut later into say quart jars, because you can suck off the extra brine and put it in those jars to help prevent yeast on the top few inches. It really is a benefit. Also extra brine afterwards is tasty and is excellent starter for the next batch.

Fermenting kraut above about 75F does not yield optimal results I have found. The kraut will get soft quickly, but it won't have much flavor. It really needs to be under 70F for best results it seems, then a nice slow 'second' ferment in a 45F or so fridge for many months afterwards yields amazing results.
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Old 09-11-2012, 12:11 PM   #38
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I definitely think it was the lack of brine.

I am going to try another batch and keep it in the closet I keep my fermenting ales.

Thanks
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Old 09-12-2012, 01:32 PM   #39
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Hi folks, I've been making kraut for several years now. A friend of mine and I make about 800lbs a year. I use only late cabbage, I seem to get a better tasting kraut. I've never had any trouble getting a lot of brine from just pounding the cabbage. I normally use a bit of extra canning salt(its a finer salt and disolves better) in the beginning to get a good brine started. I also use a double garbage bag with enough water in it to weight down the cabbage (not too much though, you want the co2 to be able to escape around the edges of the garbage bags). I then cover the buckets with cheese cloth. I use five gallon food grade buckets.
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Old 09-12-2012, 09:44 PM   #40
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How many of you get your cabbage from a grocery store? I think because I do, it is older and has less liquid so if I don't add brine I am in trouble.

Anyone ferment in warmer temps though?


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