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Old 09-16-2011, 03:35 AM   #1
theninja
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Default Not sure of gravity reading

Hello all,

Just started a batch and forgot to take gravity reading straight away in all the excitement. Wondering if any one could tell me what my OG should be?

2 cans coopers European larger
150g Vienna grain
750g maltodextrin
750g LDME
1.5kg dextrose
22 grams Czech Saaz finishing hops

Topped up to 44L.

Also what is the best way to take a reading? Is the density the same all the way through. I notice shortly after starting a batch there seems to be a layer on the bottom of the fermentor.

Cheers


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Old 09-16-2011, 12:48 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theninja View Post
Hello all,
Just started a batch and forgot to take gravity reading straight away in all the excitement. Wondering if any one could tell me what my OG should be?

Also what is the best way to take a reading? Is the density the same all the way through. I notice shortly after starting a batch there seems to be a layer on the bottom of the fermentor.

Cheers
OG isn't really that important. The character of the beer is influenced more by the FG than the OG. In any event, it doesn't matter what it should be, it only matters what it is. I always do a forced ferment test with my beer to determine the limit of attenuation.

What I'd do is take a sample, maybe 6-8oz. Measure the gravity (the density should be the same on all the wort), put into a jar, put in a tsp or two of baker's yeast, and let the portion in the jar ferment fully. Once the jar sample is done fermenting, then you know exactly how low your FG could be.

If you're aiming for a dry beer, you'll want to get close to the limit of attenuation, if you want a sweet beer, it'll be okay if it's a bit higher.


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Old 09-16-2011, 08:25 PM   #3
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Okay thanks for the tips.

Since I haven't done any of that and I'll need to work out the alcohol content or near enough. What would the original gravity be?

Thanks if anyone has brewing software.

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Old 09-16-2011, 08:34 PM   #4
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hopville.com is free brewing software online. You can plug in all the numbers and that will give an estimate for the OG. I highly recommend buying Beersmith though, best $20 I've spent on brewing.
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Old 09-17-2011, 01:10 AM   #5
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Okay so I came up with 5.2% after in the bottle and primed. Is this correct?

I thought it would be stronger? And it will be quite sweet. Is there anything I can do now to make it drier?

Thanks

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Old 09-17-2011, 01:19 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by theninja View Post
Okay so I came up with 5.2% after in the bottle and primed. Is this correct?

I thought it would be stronger? And it will be quite sweet. Is there anything I can do now to make it drier?

Thanks

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You can't know how strong and sweet it will be before it's done fermenting. What makes a beer dry or sweet is the difference between the limit of attenuation and apparent attenuation. There is no way to estimate either of those numbers, you have to measure them, via a forced ferment test for the former, and just a simple hydrometer reading for the latter.

But really, that's fairly advanced for a beginning brewer, so I wouldn't worry too much about. If you want to know more about it, read this:
http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php/Fast_Ferment_Test

ABV is determined by the difference between the original gravity and the final gravity. You just have to measure that. Software will estimate that for you, and it's usually close, but almost always off by some amount.
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Old 09-17-2011, 04:34 AM   #7
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Exactly why I asked if anyone could tell me what the original gravity should be or close to. Then I can carry on as usual.

The software you recommended also did intimate it would be more sweet then dry. Possibly because of the combination of sugars used.

Could you or someone else put my recipe into your software and see what comes out?

Much appreciated.

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Old 09-17-2011, 04:49 AM   #8
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Have you tasted the wort? If you really want to dry it out some more, Champagne yeast might do the trick...
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Old 09-17-2011, 11:55 AM   #9
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Have you tasted the wort? If you really want to dry it out some more, Champagne yeast might do the trick...
Every Champagne yeast I'm aware of doesn't ferment the complex sugars found in wort well, especially maltotriose.

I'll try running the recipe through my software. I'm at work now but I'll be home tonight.

It's an odd recipe. I haven't brewed anything like that, so I'm really not sure how to guess how it will turn out.

2 cans coopers European larger (not sure of fermentability)
150g Vienna grain (unfermentable, this will make the beer sweet)
750g maltodextrin (unfermentable, this will make the beer sweet)
750g LDME (not sure of fermentability)
1.5kg dextrose (very fermentable, this will dry the beer out)
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Old 09-17-2011, 12:02 PM   #10
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Thank you Nateo.

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