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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Course-weave BIAB Bag?
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Old 09-15-2011, 01:14 PM   #1
tonyolympia
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Default Course-weave BIAB Bag?

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Does anyone use a bag with a weave this coarse for BIAB? If so, what are your experiences? It's the same weave as a nylon hop bag.

I've seen in other posts that some BIAB-ers use a course-weave straining bag made by L.D. Carlson. If you use that bag, please tell me--is its weave as course as the weave you see in my photo?


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Old 09-15-2011, 01:32 PM   #2
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I used to use a paint strainer bag about that coarse. Depending on how finely you grind the grain, it should work. I was using a finer bag and grinding pretty fine, but when I switched to the coarse bag, I got 6 batches in a row that were pretty astringent. I traced it back to the switch in the bag coarseness, and getting more draff into the boil kettle.

I also tried the lauter-in-bag method, and got good results with the coarse bag. It just took a while to vorlauf all the grain bits out, and it's easier to just use a finer bag.


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Old 09-15-2011, 02:03 PM   #3
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That weave looks similar to my BIAB bag. I have no issues to report. Works great!
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frailn
That weave looks similar to my BIAB bag. I have no issues to report. Works great!
How fine is your crush, frail? I have close to 10 lbs of double crushed grains, including Maris Otter I had to mail-order, and if this is not the right bag to use, I'll take it back to the LHBS rather than take a chance on my winter warmer. I've really been looking forward to this brew.
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:30 PM   #5
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FWIW I was having my issues with milling conditioned grain at about 25-30mil. I switched to 45mil and the coarse bag worked ok, but still had more draff than I cared for without vorlaufing. I've switched to a proper MLT since then, which makes vorlaufing much easier.
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyolympia View Post
How fine is your crush, frail? I have close to 10 lbs of double crushed grains, including Maris Otter I had to mail-order, and if this is not the right bag to use, I'll take it back to the LHBS rather than take a chance on my winter warmer. I've really been looking forward to this brew.
I have my LHBS double mill my grain. Not sure how fine the crush is, because I don't have access to the mill behind the counter. I can't really say if I have too much trub, because I don't have anything else to compare to in my limited experience. Since the cost is low on these bags, I would recommend trying a finer weave if you have any concern. Or you could calculate your water volumes to account for more trub in the BK and/or fermenter.
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Old 09-15-2011, 02:41 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nateo View Post
I used to use a paint strainer bag about that coarse. Depending on how finely you grind the grain, it should work. I was using a finer bag and grinding pretty fine, but when I switched to the coarse bag, I got 6 batches in a row that were pretty astringent. I traced it back to the switch in the bag coarseness, and getting more draff into the boil kettle.

I also tried the lauter-in-bag method, and got good results with the coarse bag. It just took a while to vorlauf all the grain bits out, and it's easier to just use a finer bag.

How much draff were you getting in the kettle? I may have had this problem as well in the past and am wondering if my bag may be too course.

Where can you find less course paint strainer bags?
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Old 09-15-2011, 03:51 PM   #8
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Draff - meaning husk material? If so, then I have noticed some, but I always thought it was from my bag slipping when I stir the mash, and having to pull it back up. I have started re-straining going into my ale pail, and I don't end up with any husks in the final brew that I can tell.

After the mash, I throw the bag into the washing machine, then into a bucket of star san. Then I fit it into my ale pail, and dump the cooled wort into the bucket. It catches the hop trub and any husks that may be lurking around.

I have been thinking about switching to a custom sewn bag made from voille, rather than using the course bag I use which I purchased from the LHBS. I think a tighter weave would always be better.

But for now, there is not enough husk material to make much, if any, difference.
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Old 09-15-2011, 05:11 PM   #9
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I used to use some cheesecloth bags my wife sewed up for me, but they disappeared somewhere. I suspect my mother-in-law threw them away when she was doing the washing after coming over for dinner. But anyway, they're gone so I bought some paint strainer bags, and had a bunch of problems with astringency.

You can buy cheesecloth by the yard at fabric stores. It comes in different coarsenesses, and I'm not sure what you'd call the different grades, but it was pretty fine. So you can just buy a couple yards and sew them together to make a bag.

I was getting probably 1-2" of draff (bits of grain husk and endosperm) collecting in the bottom of the fermentor, more than the thin layer I was getting previously. I traced the astringency back to too much grain in the boil.

I don't think my problem is very common, and you probably won't have any issues, but just a bit of warning.
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Old 09-15-2011, 05:35 PM   #10
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Would doubling up with 2 paint strainer bags cut down on the amount of bits getting through? Or should I just look into getting some better bags?


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