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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > How do I brew the old fashioned way?
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Old 09-05-2011, 02:04 AM   #21
bengerman
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so, i'm reading through some of this, and having an issue (maybe not) with some measurements.
notably, i'm reading this one
they start talking about typical beers... "...ale made from worts whose average
specific gravity is about thirty pounds
(which answers to about two barrels
from a quarter of malt)..."
i know (i think...) that a quarter of malt should be 28 lbs
2 barrels is about 86 US gallons

so with the conversions i can find, they're using less than 1/3 lb/gallon?
that doesn't seem right to me, unless i'm missing some huge bit of information...

so what unit am i getting wrong?
or is the beer they're talking about ~ 1.010 OG?


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Old 09-05-2011, 11:13 AM   #22
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In Winchester measure (which is what you're dealing with), a quarter is eight bushels. The weight of a bushel changes depending on the grain therein; malt is 34 pounds, wheat at 60, oats 32.

Thus: 34*8= 272 lbs of malt, or 3.16 lbs per gallon.

Edited to add: If you look on page 13 of the referenced text, you'll find a handy chart to reference pounds of dissolved sugar to specific gravity. Handy.

Cheers,

Bob


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Old 09-05-2011, 02:00 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob
In Winchester measure (which is what you're dealing with), a quarter is eight bushels. The weight of a bushel changes depending on the grain therein; malt is 34 pounds, wheat at 60, oats 32.

Thus: 34*8= 272 lbs of malt, or 3.16 lbs per gallon.

Edited to add: If you look on page 13 of the referenced text, you'll find a handy chart to reference pounds of dissolved sugar to specific gravity. Handy.

Cheers,

Bob
Oh. I had assumed it was a quarter of a hundredweight. Thank you. And good tip on that chart. No I can make sense of their hydro readings
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Old 09-05-2011, 05:07 PM   #24
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Yeah, it took me a while to figure out that they were talking about volume measure, not pure weight.

Cheers!

Bob
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Old 09-05-2011, 05:39 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob View Post
I don't think so, except that the processes were combined in one facility. Records are very scant - and those secondary - prior to monastic brewing records in the 9th and 10th centuries CE. And in those records, malting and brewing took place in the same overall facility; economies of scale dictated the economics thereof. That's also the same reason the bakehouse and brewhouse were usually one building.

In BCE, even bread was made with a certain amount of sprouted grain. It wasn't long before the two processes were isolated. There is evidence that early Egyptians manufactured malt in a process not unlike the traditional floor maltings which exist today, and the Germanic tribes described by Tacitus brewed on a scale which strongly implies that malting was taking place on an equally massive scale. Economics and urbanization in Carolingian Europe shows the rise of malting as a separate craft (ca. 500 CE). It's also possible that the "bake a loaf and soak it" brewing process existed coincidentally with separate crafts for the maltster and brewer in Europe and elsewhere, most likely as a function of scale.

Thus your assumption is both true and not true at the same time, because it's damned near impossible to state anything so simplistically and definitively about prehistory or even the early Medieval period.

Bob

Just from an intellectual exercise point of view here:

I assume that back several hundred years ago (or thousands if we're talking super-early) they didn't really have any sort of humidity control on grain storage facilities. So, while this is great in arid regions, if you're in a region with higher ambient humidity (like near river valleys, where most civilizations sprang up) then within a relatively short time, any grain you had in storage would either 1) mold, or 2) sprout.

And just because it sprouts you're not about to throw it out, so what do you do with it? Answer: turn it into bread or brew it into beer.

Once they got sophisticated enough to learn about what causes the sprouting process and how to control it (i.e., malting) you probably would have seen a dramatic increase in the quality of the beer they were producing. Similar to once they discovered yeast and the role IT plays in brewing.
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:02 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob View Post
In Winchester measure (which is what you're dealing with), a quarter is eight bushels. The weight of a bushel changes depending on the grain therein; malt is 34 pounds, wheat at 60, oats 32.

Thus: 34*8= 272 lbs of malt, or 3.16 lbs per gallon.

Edited to add: If you look on page 13 of the referenced text, you'll find a handy chart to reference pounds of dissolved sugar to specific gravity. Handy.

Cheers,

Bob
and page 12 was even moe helpful on the topic "would, if filled
with sea-water, weigh 1028. If we wish
to reduce the saccharometer indications
to the proportion of a thousand, we have
only to multiply them by 2 7/9, because
1000 is 2 7/9 times 360. Thus a wort
which shows 9 lb. by the saccharometer
is equal to 25 parts'of 1000, and in the
table of gravities would be written 1025."


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