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Old 08-31-2011, 03:54 AM   #11
fifelee
 
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Humm. Interesting. I may have confused terms. I understand that malting (activating enzymes in grain) is needed to make beer. I guess I am assuming the process of malting grain then drying it for later use is a somewhat new invention. Is my assumption true that in early brewing the malting and brewing processes were somehow combined?



 
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Old 08-31-2011, 10:33 AM   #12
Bob
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I don't think so, except that the processes were combined in one facility. Records are very scant - and those secondary - prior to monastic brewing records in the 9th and 10th centuries CE. And in those records, malting and brewing took place in the same overall facility; economies of scale dictated the economics thereof. That's also the same reason the bakehouse and brewhouse were usually one building.

In BCE, even bread was made with a certain amount of sprouted grain. It wasn't long before the two processes were isolated. There is evidence that early Egyptians manufactured malt in a process not unlike the traditional floor maltings which exist today, and the Germanic tribes described by Tacitus brewed on a scale which strongly implies that malting was taking place on an equally massive scale. Economics and urbanization in Carolingian Europe shows the rise of malting as a separate craft (ca. 500 CE). It's also possible that the "bake a loaf and soak it" brewing process existed coincidentally with separate crafts for the maltster and brewer in Europe and elsewhere, most likely as a function of scale.

Thus your assumption is both true and not true at the same time, because it's damned near impossible to state anything so simplistically and definitively about prehistory or even the early Medieval period.

Bob


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Old 08-31-2011, 01:19 PM   #13
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Wow. Thanks for the great info. My interest is peeked. I will be reading some of the books mentioned earlier.

 
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Old 08-31-2011, 01:32 PM   #14
Bob
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If you're after real historical data, don't bother.

BLAM and Farmhouse Ales are outstanding for insight on modern Belgian brewing practices, but the little history contained therein has no useful detail.

For brewing history, look for history writers, not beer writers.

Here's real history. There's a LOT of good primary documents in there.

Bob
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Old 09-02-2011, 07:17 PM   #15
MikeICR
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This is incredible! Thanks for all the input and links. Looks like I've got a lot of reading to do.

I'd love to keep learning. Keep typing!

Where can I find historical recipes? (I plan to try the one gallon medieval ale mentioned earlier in this thread)

 
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Old 09-02-2011, 11:37 PM   #16
Bob
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Read through some of the source material in the link I provided. They'll leap out at you.



Bob

Edited to add: There are historical recipes in my Recipes dropdown under Mr Fawkes at left.
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Old 09-02-2011, 11:50 PM   #17
certaut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob View Post
If you're after real historical data, don't bother.

BLAM and Farmhouse Ales are outstanding for insight on modern Belgian brewing practices, but the little history contained therein has no useful detail.

For brewing history, look for history writers, not beer writers.

Here's real history. There's a LOT of good primary documents in there.

Bob
OUTSTANDING !
I can not thank you enough for the info,
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Old 09-03-2011, 06:10 AM   #18
DannPM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeICR View Post
My last few brews, as well as some of my next, have peaked my interest in traditional brewing techniques. Most of the styles I prefer to brew originate from 16th/17th century Germany and France (and area). I know I can imitate the original brews with modern techniques and technology, but I'd like to know more about how "they" did it back then. I plan to order "Brew Like A Monk" and "Farm House Ales". Are there other resources on the topic? German brewing is a real interest of mine. Please, tell me what to read!!
How to brew like you were in the 1500/1600's

1. Use a wooden barrel, most definitely needs to be infected with brett, pedio, lacto, other misc bugs that have no place in most beers.

2. Make sure your entire brew space is heavily, very heavily, infected with some sort of wild yeast, preferably multiple strains.

3. Make sure a manure stable is somewhere close to your brewery and shares the same airspace.

4. Ferment openly, no airlocks, and whatever you do, hot water and metal chains are the only methods you can use to sanitize anything.
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Old 09-03-2011, 10:36 AM   #19
Bob
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That had better be tongue in cheek.
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Old 09-03-2011, 12:34 PM   #20

Quote:
Originally Posted by DannPM View Post
How to brew like you were in the 1500/1600's

1. Use a wooden barrel, most definitely needs to be infected with brett, pedio, lacto, other misc bugs that have no place in most beers.

2. Make sure your entire brew space is heavily, very heavily, infected with some sort of wild yeast, preferably multiple strains.

3. Make sure a manure stable is somewhere close to your brewery and shares the same airspace.

4. Ferment openly, no airlocks, and whatever you do, hot water and metal chains are the only methods you can use to sanitize anything.
Sounds appealing



 
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