cooper's IPA bottles are flat - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > cooper's IPA bottles are flat

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-26-2011, 11:21 PM   #1
louisbrewg
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Louisburgh, Mayo-Ireland
Posts: 18


Hello brewers

My third batch of Cooper's IPA has been in the bottle for a coupla weeks. I crAcked two tonight and both were flat. I may have under primed.... Coopers carb drops don't relate to the size of the bottles available here in Ireland. I have to add one drop to the Grsch swing caps and one and a half to the bigger 500ml bottles. I just threw one drop into some thinking it would reduce the chance of bottle bombs - and the first two batches were really gassy, so I thought it would be ok.

My question is: should I add sugar and re- cap, or yeast? And if so, how much?



 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2011, 09:33 PM   #2
louisbrewg
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Louisburgh, Mayo-Ireland
Posts: 18

If it's yeast I should.... What type and how much ?



 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2011, 09:24 AM   #3
petey_c
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
petey_c's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2010
Miller Place, NY (Long Island)
Posts: 1,344
Liked 89 Times on 76 Posts


louisbrewg, I had a similar problem (I know that it's been some time since the OP). I'm stuck using a combination of 16 (473 ml) and 20 (591 ml) PET soda bottles. I did a rough guess-timate and melted the sugars in 2 cups of water and batch primed. It took a little longer than with powders priming sugar, but the results were good.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2011, 10:47 AM   #4
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
"Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,921
Liked 3180 Times on 1881 Posts


When you say a "couple of weeks" just how many weeks do you mean?

First, The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

Additionally, A larger volume sized bottle usually needs more time to carb AND condition. I have some pints, 22 oz bombers and other sizes that I often use, but since I enter contests I usually also do a sixer or two of standard 12 ouncers for entering. And inevitably the 12 ouncers are done at least a week faster than the larger bottles....some times two weeks ahead of time...

Also the rule of thumb is 3 weeks at 70 degrees for a normal grav 12 ounce bottle....to carb and condition....It takes longer for the yeasties to convert the larger volume in the bigger bottles to enough co2 in the headspace to be reabsorbed back into the solution...A ration I don't know how much...

Big Kahuna gives a good explanation here...
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigKahuna View Post
Simple. It's the ration of contact area just like in a keg. The c02 will need to pressurize the head space (Which takes LESS TIME) in a bigger bottle (More Yeast and sugar, roughly the same head space) but then it has to force that c02 into solution through the same contact area...thus it takes longer.
The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Thirdly Cooper's drops tend to take longer to be broken down by the yeast than dissolved priming solution does. Usually a week or 2 longer than if they had been primed normally.

I would til the beer's been in the bottles around 5-6 weeks, before messing with them. If you add too much sugar and the beers have simple not carbed yet, and there is residual sugar still in there then you could over carb you beer and end up with bottle bombs.

It's always better to wait to make sure the original priming sugar did get used up before adding a random amount that you don't know how much the combination will raise the level of co2 in the bottles.

This guy "THOUGHT" he had a problem, but it just turned out that he was expecting them to be carbed sooner that they were, if he hadn't listened to me, he would have had bottle bombs as well. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/i-th...xtrine-269636/
__________________
Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2011, 08:22 AM   #5
louisbrewg
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Louisburgh, Mayo-Ireland
Posts: 18

Many Thanks Revvy and Petey
I opened one last week and it was fizzy. I have checked all the bottles and there IS sediment...so its definitely true that patience is the key!!

Thanks again



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump