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Old 08-23-2011, 01:28 AM   #1
dougdecinces
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Jan 2011
Indianapolis, Indiana
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I have a birds eye pepper plant and it produces peppers like mad. They are about 1 cm long and hot as hell.

I have about 50-60 peppers drying in my porch right now. Since they seem the perfect size, I had the idea of brewing a beer and dropping a single dried pepper in each bottle. Has anyone tried this? What styles would work with this method? Would the final product be so hot as to render it unpalatable?

 
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Old 08-23-2011, 02:04 AM   #2
day_trippr
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May 2011
Stow, MA
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As most of the heat is from the seeds and veins well inside the skin, I'd be surprised if you got much of anything from just dropping a whole pepper in a bottle. But if you have a capper, experiment with a few different bottled brews by popping the tops, dropping in a whole pepper in some and a split pepper in the others, and recapping. Let 'em sit for as long as you can stand to wait then give them a try...

Cheers!

 
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Old 08-23-2011, 03:52 PM   #3
jlachesk
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Jan 2010
MD
Posts: 83

I did an experimental 1g batch of an APA with 2 roasted habenero chilis (roasted on the grill) split and added to the secondary. Beer stayed in the secondary for a few months (was distracted by travel for work). The resulting beer was beautiful, crystal clear, great color... but it was devastatingly hot, and I'm a big fan of spice. The first taste had a great roasty taste with a hint of chili, but the finish was a long lingering, intense burning.

If I did it again, I'd add some smoked malt to the grain bill and dial back the chilis (probably use something a little less powerful than the habeneros).

If you find something that works, post it here because it's a style I'd like to play with some more!

 
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:11 PM   #4
Bmor
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Feb 2011
lakeside, California
Posts: 6

I tried this with a porter I brewed a couple months back. I cut a Jalapeno long ways and boiled it for 5 minutes. I then added directly to a 22 at bottling. It was a pleasant bite to the aftertaste that my friend and I enjoyed. I only did this to one bottle, so I am not sure if it would have been as enjoyable after a couple bottles worth, but for 10 or so ounces that I tested, I plan on trying it again.

As a side note, we also tried the Jalapeno after the beer, it was tasteless, just devoid of any flavor or heat.

 
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:21 PM   #5
bovineblitz
 
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Mar 2010
Binghamton, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlachesk View Post
I did an experimental 1g batch of an APA with 2 roasted habenero chilis (roasted on the grill) split and added to the secondary. Beer stayed in the secondary for a few months (was distracted by travel for work). The resulting beer was beautiful, crystal clear, great color... but it was devastatingly hot, and I'm a big fan of spice. The first taste had a great roasty taste with a hint of chili, but the finish was a long lingering, intense burning.

If I did it again, I'd add some smoked malt to the grain bill and dial back the chilis (probably use something a little less powerful than the habeneros).

If you find something that works, post it here because it's a style I'd like to play with some more!
Haha man, I used 1/5 of a habenero in a gallon and the heat was strong. That must have been crazy. One way to get some smokiness and depth of flavor in there is use another pepper like an ancho, it plays nicely with habanero.

 
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Old 08-26-2011, 01:40 PM   #6
dougdecinces
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Jan 2011
Indianapolis, Indiana
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I have a maibock I plan on making in December. Maybe I'll try this experiment with a sixer of it during bottling. Worst case scenario is I end up making a couple batches of chili out of them.

 
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Old 08-26-2011, 02:03 PM   #7
Shelly
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Aug 2011
Inola, OK
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I do a smoked habenero amber ale with just 1 small pepper in the primary, and a jalapeno rye... both never last very long

 
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:41 PM   #8
wondermoose
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Jan 2011
Salt Lake City, UT
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A family member got me a Rogue Brutal Bitter kit and I'm thinking I want to improvise a little on it. This year is also the first I've had my own jalapeno plant, and I want to give a jalapeno IPA a shot. It's an extract kit, standard 5-gallon batch... Any suggestions for preparation of the jalapenos? I saw roasting worked well, but what was the exact process for that? And how many should I toss in there and when? Thanks!

 
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Old 08-26-2011, 08:48 PM   #9
dougdecinces
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Jan 2011
Indianapolis, Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wondermoose View Post
A family member got me a Rogue Brutal Bitter kit and I'm thinking I want to improvise a little on it. This year is also the first I've had my own jalapeno plant, and I want to give a jalapeno IPA a shot. It's an extract kit, standard 5-gallon batch... Any suggestions for preparation of the jalapenos? I saw roasting worked well, but what was the exact process for that? And how many should I toss in there and when? Thanks!
I'm not sure how much you should use, but here's what you do to roast them:

Get a big fire going in your grill or a fire pit. You want it to be ripping hot, flames, the whole shebang.

Heat the peppers on all sides until the jalapenos are blackened and blistered.

Place these in a paper bag and close it tight. After waiting until they cool, peel the skins, split the pepper and seed them.

Note that if you have a gas stove you can also roast these on the direct flame over the stove. But last week I made a giant wood fire and roasted 40 bell peppers and 20 jalapenos and that was a blast. Probably an 8/10 on the Man Scale.

 
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Old 08-26-2011, 09:05 PM   #10
wondermoose
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Jan 2011
Salt Lake City, UT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougdecinces View Post
I'm not sure how much you should use, but here's what you do to roast them:

Get a big fire going in your grill or a fire pit. You want it to be ripping hot, flames, the whole shebang.

Heat the peppers on all sides until the jalapenos are blackened and blistered.

Place these in a paper bag and close it tight. After waiting until they cool, peel the skins, split the pepper and seed them.

Note that if you have a gas stove you can also roast these on the direct flame over the stove. But last week I made a giant wood fire and roasted 40 bell peppers and 20 jalapenos and that was a blast. Probably an 8/10 on the Man Scale.
Wouldn't seeding them remove their hotness? Jalapenos aren't THAT hot, so I want to make sure I've got enough of a kick to make it a worthwhile venture.

 
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