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Old 08-19-2011, 11:30 PM   #1
bengerman
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Default compact soil?

my mystery hop has hops!
ok...they're tiny hops, nowhere near harvest, but onto the point of the post.

this plant has been showing signs of either potassium or phosphorus deficiency (i can't keep them straight...)
so i've been giving it 0-10-10 fertilizer to try to combat this. it's become an annoying cycle of notice deficiency, add fertilizer. signs of dificiency go away for 4-5 days, then come back.

the soil around this hop (it's in a planter) has become very compact, so i'm thinking this is causing the rapid nutrient loss.
does that sound likely?

secondly, if that is the likely root (no pun intended) cause, is there anything i can do about it during the growing season? or should i continue with the 0-10-10 and fix it during the dormant season?

my understanding is that peat moss is the best remedy for compact soil. i'm just worried that if i try to mix in some peat moss i'll damage the roots and or break the bine.


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Old 08-19-2011, 11:35 PM   #2
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Rock phosphate is excellent to promote root and flower growth, but usually put in the ground in fall. Sand will also loosen as well as compost. If you do all grain make a compost pile and throw it in there. Liquid fertilizer is a quick fix but quickly washes away as well.


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Old 08-19-2011, 11:41 PM   #3
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i have a compost bin already (bunch of big ol hippies at this house, i get lectured whenever i put compostables in the trash/yard waste)

the fertilizer i've been using is a liquid (moorbloom fish fertilizer, 0-10-10). so you're saying a dry fertilizer would have more "hang time"?

with compost/sand, i assume i'd be mixing it in with the existing soil, not just pacing it on top, correct? that's where i get worried, i really don't want to hurt the roots or bine, especially now that it has hops and burrs on it.

thanks for the quick reply!
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Old 08-19-2011, 11:48 PM   #4
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Yeah, the rock phosphate is a pellet that dissolves over time. Greensand will add potassium but is $$. Liquids tend to build up some things and deplete others and can throw off ph. I'm not sure about the root system though. Maybe you could take the rhizomes for next year and then till it all in gently?? Just leave the main root ball. Do you get a frost there? I'm thinking about putting some in here in VA.
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Old 08-19-2011, 11:49 PM   #5
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They do get some diseases that look a bit like nutrient problems too.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:03 AM   #6
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but it clears up and reverses with the 0-10-10. that has been making me assume deficiency.
EDIT: i should clarify, by reverses, i mean that new leaves and sidearms begin to grow where the damaged/fallen leaves were.

would pics help?

the other thing is that i have another bine (centennial) in a pot about 2 feet away (the tops of oth bines are actually touching/trying to tangle) with no signs of disease (i used a different potting soil and more compost when i planted it, it's also in a larger pot with less rhizomes)
so i figured that any disease probably would've spread to the centennial and it would be showing signs, too.

it's very possible i figured wrong on both counts, since this is my first venture into gardening.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleJohnnys View Post
Yeah, the rock phosphate is a pellet that dissolves over time. Greensand will add potassium but is $$. Liquids tend to build up some things and deplete others and can throw off ph. I'm not sure about the root system though. Maybe you could take the rhizomes for next year and then till it all in gently?? Just leave the main root ball. Do you get a frost there? I'm thinking about putting some in here in VA.
usually we get frost, but not very deep and not for multiple days/weeks at a time.

this is my first year gardening, so i don't know how they'll handle our little baby winters, and i'm not sure if i'll bring them in or not.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:24 AM   #8
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I'm actually trying to figure out if they need a frost. From what I can tell the only produce after 2 years and then pretty heavy the 3rd. I worked for a guy that had a greenhouse and we put one in(turned out male) but it grew about 6 inches a day. I had another (male too) that I planted on a fence against some trees and it grew about 20 feet high and I never watered or fertilized it once.

Here are some things I found:

http://www.specialtycrops.colostate...._demo/hops.htm
http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/CoopEx...igandSmall.pdf
http://www.uky.edu/Ag/NewCrops/introsheets/hops.pdf
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:33 AM   #9
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Also throw some liquid iron on there, it really perked my hops up and they got very green.
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Old 08-20-2011, 12:49 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UncleJohnnys View Post
I'm actually trying to figure out if they need a frost. From what I can tell the only produce after 2 years and then pretty heavy the 3rd. I worked for a guy that had a greenhouse and we put one in(turned out male) but it grew about 6 inches a day. I had another (male too) that I planted on a fence against some trees and it grew about 20 feet high and I never watered or fertilized it once.

Here are some things I found:

http://www.specialtycrops.colostate...._demo/hops.htm
http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/CoopEx...igandSmall.pdf
http://www.uky.edu/Ag/NewCrops/introsheets/hops.pdf
plenty of frost-less growers on here. they do need seasons (i.e. significantly shorter/longer days) but you'd get that in VA. mine were growing several inches a day (even with whatever issue it is they have), but have slowed down now that they've hit the top of their line and are flowering.


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