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Old 02-23-2013, 02:28 PM   #361
ajdelange
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Some dark crystal and roast malts contain an appreciable amount of acid. If you use those in what I personally consider to be sensible quantities you shouldn't have low mash pH and it shouldn't be necessary to add chalk, bicarbonate or lime. But as home brewers are experimenters they sometimes want to use proportions of these in more than what I consider sensible quantities and in those cases mash pH can be low and alkali must be added to the brewing water if it isn't already sufficiently alkaline.



 
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Old 04-30-2013, 09:20 PM   #362
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How would I handle flaked rice in the spreadsheet?

I'm planning on brewing a Cream Ale; 80% Pils, 20% Minute Rice.

Thanks!


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Old 06-29-2013, 02:44 AM   #363
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-TH-

will you consider adding in corn and rye in the grains section for a future version?

 
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:25 AM   #364
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Hi,

Thanks for the calculator! I'm just getting into water chemistry and this tool is a very helpful! One (probably dumb) question: I don't have to enter my water's PH anywhere? Or am I just not seeing where to enter it?

Thanks,
Mike
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:33 AM   #365
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Correct - you don't enter your water's pH as (as backwards as it seems), it doesn't really matter. It's the alkalinity that matters.

Kal

 
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Old 11-27-2013, 01:43 AM   #366
LakesideBrewing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kal View Post
Correct - you don't enter your water's pH as (as backwards as it seems), it doesn't really matter. It's the alkalinity that matters.

Kal
Thanks for the quick response! I'm sitting here thinking I was going crazy...
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Old 12-02-2013, 01:13 AM   #367
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Hey. I am just starting to learn about water chemistry and adjustments. Have used the calculator on two pale ales and now want to use it for a porter. It was mentioned earlier in this thread that you can use the northern brewer website to help categorize each grain type (ie. base, crystal malt, roasted/toasted malt or other). I am trying to input english black malt and english chocolate malt but the northern brewer website classifies each of them as "flaked/adjunct." Should I input these into the spreadsheet as "other" or should I categorize it as a "roasted/toasted" or should I put it in as a "crystal" and insert the Lovibond number? I would assume that each is a "roasted/toasted" but that is not how northern brewer has them categorized. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.
PJM

 
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Old 12-02-2013, 02:01 AM   #368
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PJM View Post
Hey. I am just starting to learn about water chemistry and adjustments. Have used the calculator on two pale ales and now want to use it for a porter. It was mentioned earlier in this thread that you can use the northern brewer website to help categorize each grain type (ie. base, crystal malt, roasted/toasted malt or other). I am trying to input english black malt and english chocolate malt but the northern brewer website classifies each of them as "flaked/adjunct." Should I input these into the spreadsheet as "other" or should I categorize it as a "roasted/toasted" or should I put it in as a "crystal" and insert the Lovibond number? I would assume that each is a "roasted/toasted" but that is not how northern brewer has them categorized. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks.
PJM
Use "Roasted/Toasted" for black and chocolate malt.

When brewing stouts & porters, I plan for a mash pH in the 5.55 range (room temp, 10 minutes into mash) and it usually comes in lower, but not below 5.4. My tap water has high alkalinity so those beers usually take a mix of tap water & DI for the mash, 100% RO for sparging always.

 
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Old 12-07-2013, 12:21 AM   #369
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Thanks DSmith. Seems like a good idea to sort of shoot for the upper end of the mash pH range when using darker malts.

I'd love some feedback on my water and how to adjust it for a Porter. Like I said, I'm new to this and don't really know what are the most important factors to consider when building water for a porter. Numbers are below:

Starting Water (ppm):
Ca: 44.1
Mg: 11.6
Na: 36.8
Cl: 54.3
SO4: 106
HCO3: 57.7

Mash / Sparge Vol (gal): 4.9075 / 5.08
RO or distilled %: 0% / 0%

Total Grain (lb): 12.8

Adjustments (grams) Mash / Boil Kettle:
CaSO4: 0 / 0
CaCl2: 4 / 4.1406011207
MgSO4: 0 / 0
NaHCO3: 0 / 0
CaCO3: 0 / 0
Lactic Acid (ml): 0
Sauermalz (oz): 0

Mash Water / Total water (ppm):
Ca: 103 / 103
Mg: 12 / 12
Na: 37 / 37
Cl: 158 / 158
SO4: 106 / 106
Cl to SO4 Ratio: 1.49 / 1.49

Alkalinity (CaCO3): 58
RA: -23
Estimated pH: 5.55
(room temp)


Thanks for any input. PJM

 
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Old 12-07-2013, 12:18 PM   #370
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You are under the mistaken thought that you can make this water more malt focused by increasing the chloride content and altering the sulfate/chloride ratio. Unfortunately, the sulfate content in that tap water is too high to enable that. All you are doing with the calcium chloride addition is making the water more minerally. 158 ppm chloride with high sulfate content is on its way to a minerally taste.

Diluting that tap water to reduce the sulfate content and THEN adding chloride is more likely to improve the malt perception and avoid minerally perception. The water should be in the background of most beers, not apparent.


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