Blow-Off tube question - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Blow-Off tube question

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-29-2011, 05:46 PM   #1
Hefanatic
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Mesa, Az
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts



Are they any changes to the brewing process that will occur as a result of using a blow-off tube VS an airlock? I am currently brewing an chocolate oatmeal milk stout in a bucket. A good friend of mine brewed the same recipe recently and he came home to a huge mess. To avoid this I used a blow off tube. When I woke up the morning after I brewed I was getting a lot of bubbles. (I know bubbles ot the lack thereof are not idicative of the fermentation process failing/succeeding in anyway) That night when I got home from work,there was no activity whatsoever. I held a light up to my bucket and I could see Krausen in the bucket. It was about 4 inches above the brew, so obviously fermentation was occurring. I was just curious if there was anything I/We (Newbs) should or shouldn't expect when using a blow-off tube. I personally used dry yeast for the first time with this recipe, so that could also add to my situation. Any help is greatly appreciated.
__________________
“Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy.”- Frank Sinatra

“I feel sorry for people who don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day.”- Frank Sinatra

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 05:51 PM   #2
unionrdr
Heavyweight homebrewing author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 38,894
Liked 3669 Times on 3153 Posts


The blow off tube is primarily for the initial fermentation stage to blow of excess co2 &/or krausen. The only effect it will have on your batch is in keeping most of it in the pale. And less on everything else. It's just a way to get rid of excessive amounts of gas or krausen that an airlock is ill-equipped to handle.
__________________
NEW books on amazon/Kindle! Check it out now...
Home Brewing- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PBAP6JO
Distopian Sci-Fi- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NTA0L6G
New! John Henry- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GBV3UXU

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 05:51 PM   #3

Sounds like your blowoff worked properly; at this point you are probably safe to just put an airlock on your bucket--but you don't have to if you don't want to.

As far as how your fermentation is progressing...a gravity reading is the only way to be sure. I'm certain you're fine--now just plan to leave that big stout in the primary for a month!
__________________
2012 Canadian Brewer of the Year
2013 Canadian Brewer of the Year
2015 Canadian Brewer of the Year

@evilgoatbrewing

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 05:51 PM   #4
shawnbou
Zyme Lord
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
shawnbou's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2009
Austin, Texas
Posts: 543
Liked 23 Times on 21 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefanatic View Post
Are they any changes to the brewing process that will occur as a result of using a blow-off tube VS an airlock?
Not really. A blow-off tube is really just a really long airlock with extra room for all the foam and krauesen that you don't want on your floor. If you've still got krauesen, your fermentation is proceeding and you're golden.

It's very possible that most of the fermentation is complete, especially if you fermented in a warm environment.
__________________
Read my brewing blog here! myBrewHome

The cans of Leinenkugel's had masking tape on them with JOHN'S printed in ink. Amy looked around me and said, "John is protective about his beer, isn't he?"
"I put that label on there. When company comes I want them to know the Leinie's is his, not mine."
- David Wong

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 05:55 PM   #5
unionrdr
Heavyweight homebrewing author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 38,894
Liked 3669 Times on 3153 Posts


That seems to be the one thing we explain a lot in regard to bubbling/no bubbles anymore. Initial fermentation where a blow off is often needed. And the slow,uneventful long haul down to FG. We all live & learn here in our own time. RDWHAHB. We should be cracking a few in a couple more hours.
__________________
NEW books on amazon/Kindle! Check it out now...
Home Brewing- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PBAP6JO
Distopian Sci-Fi- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NTA0L6G
New! John Henry- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GBV3UXU

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 06:04 PM   #6
Hefanatic
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Mesa, Az
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
That seems to be the one thing we explain a lot in regard to bubbling/no bubbles anymore. Initial fermentation where a blow off is often needed. And the slow,uneventful long haul down to FG. We all live & learn here in our own time. RDWHAHB. We should be cracking a few in a couple more hours.
Absolutely. I personally am not concerned with this brew. Whats the worst case scenario in this situation? I re-pitch? I just couldn't find a thread that actually explained the differences in the process (if any) when using a blow off tube.
__________________
“Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy.”- Frank Sinatra

“I feel sorry for people who don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day.”- Frank Sinatra

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 06:07 PM   #7
Hefanatic
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Mesa, Az
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


Thanks for all the great answers. When you're new to a process, it is always a little scary to change things up a little bit. Especially when you are just getting comfortable with the initial process. I know that personally, I was told by the salesman where I bought my kit that bubbles= fermentation, and the adverse. Fortunately I joined this forum before I worried myself when there were no bubbles.
__________________
“Alcohol may be man's worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy.”- Frank Sinatra

“I feel sorry for people who don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day.”- Frank Sinatra

Jayman931 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 06:11 PM   #8
beergolf
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
beergolf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2011
collingswood, nj
Posts: 5,876
Liked 1145 Times on 778 Posts


Each fermentation is different. It sounds like yours is doing fine. Sit back, relax and let the yeasty beasties do their job. You will make beer.

Check the gravity in a couple of weeks.

Meanwhile get another fermenter and brew another batch.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2011, 07:37 PM   #9
unionrdr
Heavyweight homebrewing author
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
unionrdr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 38,894
Liked 3669 Times on 3153 Posts


I just think new brewers need to get used to the fact that initial fermentation is the bubble like mad mode(usually). But some,like my 1st,didn't bubble at all,& came out pretty good. The rest is just finishing primary fermentation,that is pretty boring. It may look like nothing is going on. But in reality,it's quietly chugging down to FG. It knows what to do.
__________________
NEW books on amazon/Kindle! Check it out now...
Home Brewing- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PBAP6JO
Distopian Sci-Fi- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NTA0L6G
New! John Henry- https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GBV3UXU

Jayman931 Likes This 
Reply With Quote


Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Blow Off Tube Question bennyd Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 18 01-02-2011 09:29 PM
blow off tube question Legions Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 12-03-2010 09:25 PM
Blow off tube question Diablotastic Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 08-16-2010 06:43 PM
blow off tube question baseballstar4 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 02-25-2010 05:02 AM
Blow over tube question cyfan964 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 03-15-2007 12:18 AM


Forum Jump