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Old 07-26-2011, 02:21 PM   #11
BigTerp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
Rehydrating dry yeast is almost always a good idea - assuming of course that you are sanitary and careful about your process. The homebrewing instructions on the packets are intended as the simplest, you-can't-screw-this-up procedure. But if you look at the same yeast manufacturer's websites for professional brewers, they all recommend rehydrating the yeast. Sprinkling the yeast directly on the wort certainly works, but rehydrating the yeast will give you a healthier fermentation.

As for the swamp cooler - you shouldn't need to worry about leaving it unattended for 8 hours - the thermal mass of the water in the cooler plus the liquid beer should be enough to maintain a cool enough temp (once you've gotten the temp down). Especially since your ambient air temp won't be drastically higher.Good luck!
This is what I have found to be true. I brewed on Saturday and fermentation took off Sunday morning, slowly. By yesterday morning my airlock was bubbling away nicely. I had my swamp cooler ready on Saturday with water temperature at 62 degrees (I don't use a t-shirt, just frozen water bottles). I tossed a bottle in yesterday before I left for work and when I got home (10 hours later) the water temp was at 64-65. I actually have to be carefull not to get it down to low. My ambient temp in the closet I use is a steady 72.



 
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Old 07-26-2011, 02:49 PM   #12
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Read this last post.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/sta...-yeast-244035/



 
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Old 07-26-2011, 03:01 PM   #13
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Yes rehydrate ... read this by Jim Palmer:
http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-5.html

Explains using dry yeast very nicely.
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Old 07-26-2011, 03:08 PM   #14
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I've found that to be a bit inaccurate nowadays (the starter link above). I've pitched dry yeast in a small,albeit light starter with great results. Re-hydrating more than thirty minutes worked well too. Next time I re-hydrate,I'll wait till I'm chilling the wort to give it the recommended 30 minutes,& see how it goes. Sometimes,cheaper & quicker works well. But they're not entirely correct,according to my experiences. Just do whatever way works for you. These guys can & have been proven wrong...
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:10 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
Just do whatever way works for you.
+1...Do what works for you. The only way to know is to go for it. But, in my experience whether you do or don't rehydrate doesn't make a noticeable difference in the beer. Yes, Palmer does recommend rehydrating. He also recommends making a pseudo-starter using table sugar to check the viability of the yeast. That's really what all of his discussion of dry yeast is about, making sure you have viable yeast. If you are worried about the viability of the yeast in your packet, follow Palmer's advice. Personally, I don't worry about. You can always pitch another packet later if it doesn't take off.

 
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Old 07-26-2011, 04:20 PM   #16
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I've found that the smaller sachets,&/or cheaper yeasts tend to need a little help to perform well,in my own experiments. But the better,larger dry yeast packets work quite well pitched dry,usually. But re-hydrating them can make them take off quicker,& a bit more vigorously. At least,waking them up & getting their cell walls up to snuff to keep the yeasties healthier when pitched into wort with hop oils & all in it.
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Old 07-26-2011, 05:45 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigTerp View Post
This is what I have found to be true. I brewed on Saturday and fermentation took off Sunday morning, slowly. By yesterday morning my airlock was bubbling away nicely. I had my swamp cooler ready on Saturday with water temperature at 62 degrees (I don't use a t-shirt, just frozen water bottles). I tossed a bottle in yesterday before I left for work and when I got home (10 hours later) the water temp was at 64-65. I actually have to be carefull not to get it down to low. My ambient temp in the closet I use is a steady 72.

This goes with my estimation of a rise in temp throughout the day of approx 3-4 degrees. My point was it would be ideal to start the day a few degrees low and then finish on the mark rather than having it go a few degrees over. Either way though it shouldn't be that big of a deal as long as you are fermenting near the middle to low side of the desired temp range.

I am lucky that I have a small room that stays cool enough that all I need to do is put my carboy in a water bath and then MAYBE add a water bottle or two throughout fermentation. I will however put the carboy in the water right after aerating. I will then pitch and add a few frozen water bottles to get the wort down to the desired rang ASAP. Once there it will hold. So far I have been fermenting everything at 67-68f.


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