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Old 09-10-2011, 04:25 PM   #51
passedpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bja View Post
What do you do when your pool is 90+ degrees?
I don't let my pool get over 85. But of course, that's not a good pitching temp.

I have a chest freezer right next to the pool. I drop the 85F carboy into the chest freezer. It's always down to temp in a mater of a few hours. I'm good with that.

I've used a pre-chiller IC (for after I'd get to 85), but I don't like to bother with ice anymore.
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Old 09-10-2011, 04:45 PM   #52
BeerMe21
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Simply adjust the flow... If the IC output is not significantly warmer than the input then the flow is too high.

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Old 09-10-2011, 05:39 PM   #53
bambrew
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Since I'm brewing in a shed that doesn't have any real plumbing, I direct the hot water coming out of my chiller to an old 40 gallon water heater tank I have in there (not hooked up to any gas) I can then pump the hot water back for all my cleaning needs for that brew day, without having to haul all my stuff up to my house to clean it.

 
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:04 AM   #54
snowbeavers
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philjohnwilliams View Post
Because many of the people here are brewing All Grain or are doing full wort extract boils, neither of which allow for adding water (or ice) post boil.
Thanks. I realized this after talking with my friend last night. I have been doing partial grains instead of full grains so this made sense to me.

 
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:54 PM   #55
geezerpk
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I use a conventional immersion chiller and run the output into a 15 gallon plastic tub. When that tub's filled I stop the flow. (Water in the tub gets used for garden as needed.) Generally that takes the temp to around 100, a lot lower in the winter. I transfer the wort to a muslin wrapped fermentor set up as a swamp cooler with small evaporator fan at this point. Usually takes another couple of hours to chill to pitching temps. If it's summer time I just continue the swamp cooler operation for the first 4 or 5 days of fermenting.

 
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:06 PM   #56
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A 5# block of Dry Ice
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Old 09-11-2011, 04:35 PM   #57
Daemin
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The lady that owned my house before me was a little... off.

The water supply to the house was a "gravity fed spring system." That is, in the woods behind the house, up a hill which situated it higher than the second floor of the house, was an open pool about 10'x10', unknown depth, partialy covered with a tarp supported by 2x4's. At the bottom of the pool was a copper pipe that ran down hill to the basement, where it connected to the houses water supply pipes. The pool is full of leaves, frogs, and god knows what else. It was goddamn disgusting.

As a condition of sale, she had a new well installed. But they left the old water feed in place in the basement, just capped it with a ball valve. So that's what I use for watering the plants outside, and for feeding my immersion cooler. I just take extra care that the water is contained and doesn't leak into the wort. I don't feel too concerned about where the water goes after heating up, as its not potable, and not doing anyone any good as is.

 
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Old 09-15-2011, 10:38 AM   #58
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Here is something I found interesting...should put everyones mind at ease on wasting some water for homebrewing...I wouldn't worry about it....

http://www.hbmwd.com/site_documents/...industries.pdf

 
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:17 PM   #59
schmagy
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No one mentions agitating the wort with IC chillers. Its all about delta T. Grab a glove and stir/shake that chiller baby....... as you run the chiller the wort closest to the chiller will cool down, leaving a transition layer near the coils that has very low temp differential.

Agitating the wort makes keeps the hottest possible wort right next to the cold coils and maintains efficiency. Uses half the water.

Plate chillers (in addition to huge surface area) naturally have turbulent flow

 
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Old 09-15-2011, 12:18 PM   #60
schmagy
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If you use liquid yeast, it will give you a real nice headstart on aeration as well

 
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