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Old 08-03-2011, 05:48 AM   #21
scrambledegg81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennisusa View Post
I don't see where he says it gets boiled a 2nd time. Once only - before adding the hops.
Read that backwards, apparently....thought it was tea first, then priming solution.


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Old 08-24-2011, 09:18 AM   #22
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Perhaps a better method would be to use cold water in the french press and to let it sit overnight before adding to keg or at bottling. This would ensure no aromatics are lost to heat but would allow enough time.

Another idea is to use the beer thats being kegged / bottled. In other words pour some of the beer into the french press while kegging and then make the hop tea (either heating or using cold). The beers pH would be lower than water for possible better hop utilization and wouldn't dilute the finished product.

Any thoughts ?



 
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:00 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scrambledegg81 View Post
It sounds like a good idea, but utilizing boiling water once to get the tea, then boiling it again to make the priming solution makes me think that a lot of the aromatics would evaporate. Haven't tried/experienced hop tea before, but that sounds like what might happen.
What I did was boil my priming solution. Pour that into the french press containing the hops and let steep for about 1-1/2 hours. Worked great.
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:06 AM   #24
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One thing I have considered is that using hot priming solution for 1-2 hours steep, could add some bitterness to the beer. Sure, it is not staying at 212f for the whole time like a boil, but I imagine there is no bitterness added while dry hopping. I was going to try dry hopping my kolsch that is about ready to be cold crashed, but I decided to do another hop tea when I keg on Sunday or Monday.

I think this time around I will sample the tea to see if any bitterness is perceived.
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:50 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bru
Perhaps a better method would be to use cold water in the french press and to let it sit overnight before adding to keg or at bottling. This would ensure no aromatics are lost to heat but would allow enough time.

Another idea is to use the beer thats being kegged / bottled. In other words pour some of the beer into the french press while kegging and then make the hop tea (either heating or using cold). The beers pH would be lower than water for possible better hop utilization and wouldn't dilute the finished product.

Any thoughts ?
Bru:
Although I don't ever worry about infections from traditional dry-hopping, I'd worry about steeping unboiled hops in cold water overnight (no CO2, no alcohol, and a high pH). Your suggestion to steep hops with beer in the french press is intriguing, but isn't that dry-hopping after all?

 
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Old 08-25-2011, 11:34 AM   #26
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All of this sound very interesting, and I look forward to trying this technique when I can stay home long enough to brew another batch of beer and not go on another deployment to the Gulf or Afghanistan.

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Old 08-25-2011, 04:51 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bru View Post
Perhaps a better method would be to use cold water in the french press and to let it sit overnight before adding to keg or at bottling. This would ensure no aromatics are lost to heat but would allow enough time.
I think you'd get less impact this way...the hop oils are hydrocarbons which do not have good solubility in water, and it's even lower in higher densitiy liquids (1.010 - 1.020 FG beer). Steeping with hot (not boiling) water increases the solubility of these compounds and is probably responsible for the bigger perceived hop aroma/flavor. The trade-off here is the loss of the most gentle aromatics with the application of heat. These would likely remain in a traditional dry-hopping scheme.

Best compromise: use both. I'm excited to try it in my next hop-forward beer.

 
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Old 08-25-2011, 05:39 PM   #28
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I have an idea. What do ya'll think:

boil water, put water in a big jar, add hops, close jar and wait for it to cool. Aromatics can't get away if you let the steam condense on the inside of the jar and run back into the tea....
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:01 PM   #29
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I thought the essence of hop teas was two-fold:

1. Don't let the hops reach boiling temperatures
2. Steep the hops in liquid hotter than room temperature -- otherwise you're dry hopping

Why all the boiling water/cold extraction suggestions? Shouldn't we be talking about different steeping times at different temperatures (100*F vs 175*F etc)?
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Old 08-26-2011, 03:08 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbeergeek View Post
I thought the essence of hop teas was two-fold:

1. Don't let the hops reach boiling temperatures
2. Steep the hops in liquid hotter than room temperature -- otherwise you're dry hopping

Why all the boiling water/cold extraction suggestions? Shouldn't we be talking about different steeping times at different temperatures (100*F vs 175*F etc)?
I most definitely agree with Bigbeergeek....
(1) Start by boiling the water - to minimize dissolved oxygen being added to the beer;
(2) Pour boiling water into french press & allow to cool to 170 F - the approx temp below which alpha acids no longer add IBUs to liquids*;
(3) Add hops to the French press, stir, cover, and slowly allow to cool to room temp - this makes a highly aromatic hop tea without adding bitterness*;
(4) Filter hops with the press and siphon tea to secondary fermenter or serving kegs (prior to carbonation).

The primary appeal of this method over dry-hopping is that beer at 65 F and 1.012 SG takes on hop aromas less efficiently than water at 150 F and 1.000 SG. IPAs with their hop-resisting FGs and dextrinous bodies benefit the most from after-hopping but are also the most challenging to infuse with hop aromas. Hop tea solves these problems. Yet provided it is not over-heated there should be minimal destruction of the hop aroma profile. And provided one does not steeps for long periods of time at cold temps without the protective presence of alcohol, CO2 and low pHs, the risk of infection is minimal. This is not a substitute for dry-hopping, rather it os an alternative to it. Not having to deal with hop leaves or pellets at this late stage also works for me.

* Note: Isomerization of bittering alpha acids are not limited to the boil - it also occurs at temps all the way down to approx 180. (If in doubt, pour boiling water into a coffee mug, stir in a hop pellet, then sipp a beverage of biblical bitterness).



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