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Old 07-21-2011, 11:37 PM   #11
Zebulon
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Jul 2011
Honolulu, HI
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The reason I say Ketchup Beer is because the flavor of ketchup is not the same as just tomato. The vinegar is actually a major component of the flavor, but I posit that a ketchup beer could possibly be good.

I like the idea of making the ketchup from scratch, Smagee. Having it at the ideal sugar content and taste before brewing it with the wort. Mixing in tomato and other ingredients in the beer seem like a way to make "tomato soup beer".

And just to reiterate, I actually don't eat much ketchup, am not an avid fan or anything.

So, maybe I'm thinking, in order to keep the keptchupy taste it would be better to add the ketchup as a late boil addition. But I'm wondering about the % of ketchup needed to make the flavor balanced. Any ballpark guesses?



 
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:49 PM   #12
usfmikeb
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Jan 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zebulon View Post
The vinegar is actually a major component of the flavor, but I posit that a ketchup beer could possibly be good.
No offense, but a beer with vinegar in it will never taste good, as the vinegar interferes with the chemical processes of fermentation.



 
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Old 07-21-2011, 11:59 PM   #13
ArcaneXor
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Nov 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usfmikeb View Post
No offense, but a beer with vinegar in it will never taste good, as the vinegar interferes with the chemical processes of fermentation.
Well, technically that's not true. Acetic acid is an important flavor contributor to some Flanders ales. That doesn't mean, of course, that dumping a vinegar-processed sugar solution into a beer is a good idea.

OP: If you are insisting on adding vinegar to your beer, be sure it's a high quality type that you know does not have any live bacteria in it - such as distilled.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 12:00 AM   #14
Zebulon
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Jul 2011
Honolulu, HI
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I didn't know vinegar was harmful to yeast, i thought vinegar was made via fermentation of some sort i guess. I claim no knowledge of the process.

Any ideas about making a beer tangy/zesty without any vinegar? That could be a deal breaker for the particular flavor, maybe?

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 12:06 AM   #15
SwampassJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zebulon View Post

Any ideas about making a beer tangy/zesty without any vinegar? That could be a deal breaker for the particular flavor, maybe?
Read up on sour mashing.
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Old 07-22-2011, 12:08 AM   #16
usfmikeb
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I believe that the amount of acetic acid that is a byproduct of the yeast blends typically used for sour beers (such as Roeselare) isn't anywhere near the amount you'd find in a bottle of ketchup. Check the ingredients, there's more vinegar than sugar, and that junk is full of sugar.

EDIT: Also forgot to mention that the bugs producing acids in sour ales typically do so during the aging process, not during primary fermentation.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 12:13 AM   #17
Thehopguy
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Jun 2011
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I like my beer and ketchup seperate.
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Old 07-22-2011, 02:33 AM   #18
smagee
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I'd second the sour mash idea as far as reproducing the "tang" without the vinegar. However, it could result in a dry beer due to the wild bugs present. Not sure how to balance those two... could take a bit of research.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 02:42 AM   #19
TwoGunz
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http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pruno

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 03:13 AM   #20
ReverseApacheMaster
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Add some ketchup to a glass of beer and see if you like the taste. Ok, if you do, that's probably the best it's ever going to taste.

When the sugar ferments out of the ketchup you're going to be left with a small amount of tomato flavor and a lot of vinegar. It's not going to taste like ketchup anymore. If you add enough ketchup, the vinegar may lower the ph of the wort enough that it starts to stress the yeast and cause off flavors. So in short, you're not going to get anything close to what you want by adding ketchup. If you really like the flavor of ketchup in your beer, feel free to add it in the glass.



 
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