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Old 07-21-2011, 06:51 PM   #1
tegeberg
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Jul 2011
Montréal, Québec
Posts: 67


Hi guys

First post here at this awesome forum which has helped me a lot getting safely through my first batch (which I tasted a few days ago and to my surprise it was really good, far over what I had expected). Second batch gets under way this weekend and I am more than hooked already.

For the first two batches I went to a local homebrew store and got ingredients as well as the recipe from the owner. He is pretty expensive though, and I would love to get going on looking at not just following his advice all the way through but maybe being able to configure some stuff to my own taste.

So I was wondering is there any place you know of on the internet (or any book?) that lists a large amount of extract with steeping recipes covering a large variety of styles? There are loads and loads of them in here, but I would like some sort of an overview to get an idea as to what are the basis ingredients for every style etc.

Any source, website etc. you can recommend?

Thanks a lot in advance!

 
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Old 07-21-2011, 06:53 PM   #2
nefarious_1_
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Jan 2011
Hudson Valley, NY
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google.

 
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Old 07-21-2011, 06:54 PM   #3
nefarious_1_
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Jan 2011
Hudson Valley, NY
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hahaha, had to do it, sorry.

But in all seriousness, try tastybrew.com, beerrecipes.org, hopville.com/recipes, etc. I think ratebeer.com has some too. There's a ton out there.

A lot of the recipes are bunk or don't explain enough to brew a decent beer though, IMO. I'd try some of the recipes on here before anything else, that way you can ask the person who posted the recipe any questions you might have. Forewarned is forearmed.

 
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:10 PM   #4
Yooper
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Our recipe database here is very good. Also, my favorite book for beer style recipes is "Brewing Classic Styles" by Jamil Zainasheff and John Palmer.
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Old 07-21-2011, 09:14 PM   #5
emjay
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Jan 2011
Toronto, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
Our recipe database here is very good. Also, my favorite book for beer style recipes is "Brewing Classic Styles" by Jamil Zainasheff and John Palmer.
+1 on the book. Definitely recommend it as the one recipe book EVERYONE should have.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 02:44 AM   #6

The recipe database on this site is great, especially because often you can communicate directly with the people who created the recipes. Most people on here are friendly and very helpful.

Also try The Joy of Homebrewing, by Charlie Papazian. Very informative, and a lot of recipes.

Also many online homebrew suppliers offer a lot of info on their recipe kits. Northernbrewer.com has PDFs of all of the ingredients and instructions that you get with their kits. You can study those and get a feel for what commonly goes into each style.

But seriously, this site is one of the best places to learn. It's been huge in my development as a homebrewer.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 04:29 AM   #7
jjanderton
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Jun 2011
Limerick, Ireland, Limerick
Posts: 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Our recipe database here is very good. Also, my favorite book for beer style recipes is "Brewing Classic Styles" by Jamil Zainasheff and John Palmer.
Hi....
I'd would like to suggest you the same book...... Other than that there are 4 steps I like to suggest to have awesome beer.......

PREPARATION

1. Clean & sterilise your equipment. Instructions are provided.
2. Put the yeast aside for the fermentation stage.
3. Dissolve the contents of the can in 2 to 4 litres of very hot water in a sterilised bucket. Use less hot water in hot weather & more in cold weather. Add 1kg of glucose or dextrose and stir to dissolve. DO NOT USE SUGAR.
4. Add about 10 litres of cold water to your fermenter, transfer the hot mixture from the bucket to your fermenter & mix thoroughly. Top up with cold water to the 22.5 litre mark.


FERMENTATION

1. Sprinkle the yeast onto the surface.
2. Seal the fermenter, fit the airlock and half fill it with cool boiled water.
3. Allow the brew to ferment. Try to keep the temperature in the fermenter reasonably constant in the low 20's and try to avoid it falling below about 18ºC. Typically this takes about a week.
4. Fermentation is finished when the airlock stops bubbling and the brew itself begins to clear. Allow a further 48 hours for it to clear thoroughly.


BOTTLING

1. Sterilise the bottles & rinse with cool boiled water.
2. Use your priming scoop to put a measured amount of sugar into each bottle.
3. Fill each bottle to within 50mm of the top.
4. Close each bottle with a crown cap and seal it firmly with a capping tool.
5. Shake thoroughly then stand the bottles in a warm spot (say around 20 to 22ºC.) for about a week then store for at least another 2 weeks before sampling.


MATURATION

Homebrew improves greatly with bottle ageing and will not go off in the bottle at all. A six month old beer will be very much better than a one month old beer. So, try to age your beers, you will enjoy them much more. In fact, you will be amazed at how much your aged beers have improved. Don't forget to label and date each batch. Keep samples to try at 3, 6 and 12 months old. Take notes about how they taste then you will see for yourself how this amazing improvement works.
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Old 07-22-2011, 04:43 AM   #8
tegeberg
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Jul 2011
Montréal, Québec
Posts: 67

Thanks for the answers, you guys rock! Does a book like "Brewing Classic Styles" mainly list all grain recipes or does it like "How to brew" list all grain as well as extract options for each style?

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 05:25 AM   #9
emjay
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Jan 2011
Toronto, Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tegeberg
Thanks for the answers, you guys rock! Does a book like "Brewing Classic Styles" mainly list all grain recipes or does it like "How to brew" list all grain as well as extract options for each style?
That particular book provides at least one recipe for every single BJCP-defined beer style, and most of them are extract recipes (with and without steeping grains). The ones that aren't extract recipes are partial mash recipes (which is still doable with the equipment used for extract brewing), and only because they are styles that can't be properly brewed without a portion of mashed grain.

All recipes also include a small section at the end for how to convert it to all-grain, but if you're doing extract brewing, you don't to worry about that anyways.

 
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Old 07-22-2011, 01:39 PM   #10
unionrdr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjanderton View Post
Hi....
I'd would like to suggest you the same book...... Other than that there are 4 steps I like to suggest to have awesome beer.......

PREPARATION

1. Clean & sterilise your equipment. Instructions are provided.
2. Put the yeast aside for the fermentation stage.
3. Dissolve the contents of the can in 2 to 4 litres of very hot water in a sterilised bucket. Use less hot water in hot weather & more in cold weather. Add 1kg of glucose or dextrose and stir to dissolve. DO NOT USE SUGAR.
4. Add about 10 litres of cold water to your fermenter, transfer the hot mixture from the bucket to your fermenter & mix thoroughly. Top up with cold water to the 22.5 litre mark.


FERMENTATION

1. Sprinkle the yeast onto the surface.
2. Seal the fermenter, fit the airlock and half fill it with cool boiled water.
3. Allow the brew to ferment. Try to keep the temperature in the fermenter reasonably constant in the low 20's and try to avoid it falling below about 18ºC. Typically this takes about a week.
4. Fermentation is finished when the airlock stops bubbling and the brew itself begins to clear. Allow a further 48 hours for it to clear thoroughly.


BOTTLING

1. Sterilise the bottles & rinse with cool boiled water.
2. Use your priming scoop to put a measured amount of sugar into each bottle.
3. Fill each bottle to within 50mm of the top.
4. Close each bottle with a crown cap and seal it firmly with a capping tool.
5. Shake thoroughly then stand the bottles in a warm spot (say around 20 to 22ºC.) for about a week then store for at least another 2 weeks before sampling.


MATURATION

Homebrew improves greatly with bottle ageing and will not go off in the bottle at all. A six month old beer will be very much better than a one month old beer. So, try to age your beers, you will enjoy them much more. In fact, you will be amazed at how much your aged beers have improved. Don't forget to label and date each batch. Keep samples to try at 3, 6 and 12 months old. Take notes about how they taste then you will see for yourself how this amazing improvement works.
Don't count on the airlock to gauge fermentation,it's just a pressure relief valve. And it usually takes more than a week for a beer to reach a stable FG,& have time to clean up it's by-products. It also allows more trub to settle out & clear some more.
I also wouldn't advise rinsing the sanitizer off the bottles. Products like star-san are only viable when wet. Rinsing it off is allowing nasties another chance.
Using a bottling wand,always fill the bottle all the way to the top to get the proper head space when the wand is removed. Priming with sugar in the bottle is ok,But a measured amount in 2C boiling water to bulk prime gets more even carbonation. 3 weeks minimum recommended time in the bottles to condition is the norm.
And beer can "go off" in the bottle insomuch as the hops & malt flavor fade/change over the course of time. Average to medium gravity beers do not age well. Big beers are usually meant to age a long time,like stout,barleywine,etc.
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