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Old 07-18-2011, 07:27 PM   #1
bottlebomber
 
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I just did a Tripel, and it called for 3 lbs of candi sugar, two were added in the boil, and the third I put in at high krausen. I used WLP500 1.5 liter, followed a day later by Wyeast 3787 1 liter. I started fermentation at 62, and let it climb to 72 over a week. After a week I checked the gravity and it had come down from 1.105 to 1.012. Whammy.

What I noticed immediately about this was it had a super strong cider aroma, from the simple sugars I know. It was also really hot of course. What im wondering is this- does the cider go away? I've never made a belgian before, im trying to get out of my IPA pigeon hole, and so I made this. Im not expecting to drink it any time soon, BTW. Thanks in advance for your feedback.

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:02 PM   #2
JoePro
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How old is the tripel? High OG beers need aging. Hard. I did a belgian Tripel over the weekend with an estimated OG of 1.089.

That sucker isn't going to see the light of day for another 5 months minimum.

My advice to you is, if you can, lager it for a month. So, a month in primary, another month lagering, and then 2.5-3 months bottle conditioning. The cidery taste will go away for sure.

Also, what's your grain bill? 3 lbs of sugar seems like a lot...

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:06 PM   #3
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Most beers will improve over time. Tripels are one of those beer styles that tend to need a long conditioning period, especially with 12% ABV. It sounds like your beer will definitely improve over time. It sounds like you do have a very dry beer, and at 12% ABV, you need to have a good recipe or else you might have something that doesn't taste good no matter how long you condition it for.

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:12 PM   #4
RIT_Warrior
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Sugar does not give cider aromas or flavors...that is an old chestnut that refuses to die, much like "use a secondary to get your beer off the yeast" and "squeezing your grain bag releases tannins".

Running your numbers, it looks like your sugar was around 15% of fermentables, which is right where you want it for a tripel. If I had to guess I'd say your beer has acetaldehyde in it (a normal byproduct of fermentation that clears up later), and just give it a week or 3 in the fermenter until you were satisfied with the taste.

http://www.homebrewzone.com/acetaldehyde.htm

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 11:32 PM   #5
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echo what joe said... my tripel was very hot, citrusy and thin at 11%... hadn't had one in months so i cracked one open last night and it was yummy! rich and golden... still citrusy but not hot at all and no off flavors...

seems it really wanted to hang out in the bottle for a few months... i will be hitting that one hard here now.

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 01:29 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RIT_Warrior
Sugar does not give cider aromas or flavors...that is an old chestnut that refuses to die
Im ready to accept that, only this is what I've always heard. I've never used more than a pound of simple sugar, and never had this issue. Now that I have used the 3 lbs, im having it. Go figure...

Just checked that link... its really not a green apple flavor though, its really the cidery one, which according to the link is either 1. Too young (yes. I brewed it 10 days ago.) Or 2. Too much sugar, which the site acknowledges is open for debate

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 01:33 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoePro
My advice to you is, if you can, lager it for a month. So, a month in primary, another month lagering, and then 2.5-3 months bottle conditioning. The cidery taste will go away for sure.
I can lager. I have a kolsch that will need to be done first, but the timing should be right. What is lagering going to do for the belgian, though?

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 02:12 AM   #8
theonetrueruss
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I find WLP500 is very fruity tasting until it ages a few months.

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 11:49 PM   #9
pdxal
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Brewed 10 days ago?
Patience, patience...

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 11:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxal View Post
Brewed 10 days ago?
Patience, patience...
Yeah... dude, seriously?

Last time I brewed a tripel it was 2 months in primary, rack to a cornie keg, let that sit at room temp for 4 months. Another week or two in the kegerator on gas and it was stellar.

Give it time. With big beer comes big waiting.
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