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Old 07-17-2011, 09:18 PM   #1
bjl110
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May 2011
Chillicothe, Ohio
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Just finished bottling my first batch. W00T! Now comes the hard part.
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Fermenting/Aging:Williamette Pale
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Old 07-17-2011, 11:44 PM   #2
SD-SLIM
 
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Welcome to brewing...for Ales, I would strongly recommend 2 weeks in the primary, 1 week conditioning...make sure your fermentation temperatures are in line...and you will have great beer!

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 01:46 AM   #3
bjl110
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May 2011
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Yeah, I was able to be patient so far. 2 weeks in the primary, 1 in a secondary (so I could fill the primary again), and I'm going to try and make it three weeks before I crack the first one. No promises though I'm lucky on the fermentation temp front, my basement stays about 63-65 even when it's 90 outside.

I already have another brew going and ingredients for two more. I think the brewing bug bit me.
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Fermenting/Aging:Williamette Pale
Bottled: BDSA, Brandon's Brown
On Deck: Birthday IIPA
Thinking About: Oak Aged Stout, BDSA
Oh Lisa, you and your stories. Bart is a vampire, beer kills braincells. Now let's all go back to that ...building...thingy...where our beds and TV...is. - Homer

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 02:03 AM   #4
doctorRobert
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjl110
Yeah, I was able to be patient so far. 2 weeks in the primary, 1 in a secondary (so I could fill the primary again), and I'm going to try and make it three weeks before I crack the first one. No promises though I'm lucky on the fermentation temp front, my basement stays about 63-65 even when it's 90 outside.

I already have another brew going and ingredients for two more. I think the brewing bug bit me.
I think you should open up a bottle, one per week, so you can see how it changes. Plus you'll want to anyway
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:00 AM   #5
bjl110
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May 2011
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I was thinking about that. I couldn't decide if it was a good idea or a justification and a waste of beer.

Btw - is the beer supposed to taste "finished" by the time you bottle it? This one (Irish stout) still tastes pretty off especially compared to my IPA, which tastes like a flat IPA. The taste is ok-ish, but it smells a bit alcoholic and just....off. Not even close to a Guiness or Murphy's.
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Fermenting/Aging:Williamette Pale
Bottled: BDSA, Brandon's Brown
On Deck: Birthday IIPA
Thinking About: Oak Aged Stout, BDSA
Oh Lisa, you and your stories. Bart is a vampire, beer kills braincells. Now let's all go back to that ...building...thingy...where our beds and TV...is. - Homer

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:11 AM   #6
1Mainebrew
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, Maine
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No, it will morph and change significantly after a month in the bottles at room temp (which is my personal preference before putting them into the fridge, they just seem to taste better that way-except wits and IPAs which get 3 weeks before the fridge). Stouts especially I find benefit from a little extra aging because of the roasted malts. Don't rush your beer. You will be significantly rewarded for your patience. Btw, what was your recipe?
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:24 AM   #7
bjl110
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May 2011
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Don't have it in front of me, and I'm on my phone so linking is a pain, but it was the Midwest Irish Stout kit. I used the Irish ale wyeast option. I'll probably be brewing several stouts as they are a favorite around here (and swmbo approval is clutch ), so I figured I'd just wash it and use it in the next several batches. I'd also like to get experience making starters anyway as BDSA is my favorite style (and one of my first major goals to brew).
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Fermenting/Aging:Williamette Pale
Bottled: BDSA, Brandon's Brown
On Deck: Birthday IIPA
Thinking About: Oak Aged Stout, BDSA
Oh Lisa, you and your stories. Bart is a vampire, beer kills braincells. Now let's all go back to that ...building...thingy...where our beds and TV...is. - Homer

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:44 AM   #8
the_trout
 
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I also say go ahead and sample your brew early. I like to wait 2 weeks, throw one in the fridge for 2 days and give it a shot then weekly after that.

For me, it's like watching your kids grow up. At 2 weeks they are young and raw but you can get a good feel for who they will be, at 3 they are more mature but still lack the expierence of age, at 4 they are grown and ready to go out into the world. Come to think of it, sampling maybe be my favorite part of the whole proccess.

If your worried about beer loss consider bottling some 7oz ponies specificly for testers.
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Old 07-18-2011, 04:00 AM   #9
Bierliebhaber
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjl110 View Post
Btw - is the beer supposed to taste "finished" by the time you bottle it? This one (Irish stout) still tastes pretty off especially compared to my IPA, which tastes like a flat IPA. The taste is ok-ish, but it smells a bit alcoholic and just....off. Not even close to a Guiness or Murphy's.
No worries...stouts and porters are notorious for smelling "wrong" before they're mature. Many a-brewer has fretted over an off smelling stout or porter, as they keg or bottle, only to find a wonderfully aromatic and tasty beverage weeks later.

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 12:25 PM   #10
nos33
 
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my irish stout i brewed didnt really taste like a stout until about month 4. and now at month 7 they are fantastic.

 
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