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Old 07-18-2011, 08:44 PM   #21
Misplaced_Canuck
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Originally Posted by badmajon View Post
That's exactly what I do... 10 feet of copper in an ice bath after the CF chiller.
My next step is to use a good dose of salt in the ice water bath.

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Old 07-18-2011, 08:54 PM   #22
thughes
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No chill.

Knocked at least an hour off my brew day (between chilling, not having to deal with yeast on brew day, and clean up). Allows me to stack up a few cubes of wort to pitch whenever I get around to it. I'm thinking about brewing up a bunch while the weather is nice and I can then ferment as needed over the winter.

Those boys in Oz are on to something......
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Old 07-18-2011, 09:13 PM   #23
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I think it can be done. It used to take me an hour to go from mash temperatures to boiling, but I got a Bayou Classic Banjo Cooker and now it only takes 18 minutes.

I haven't done this yet, but it I'm pretty sure that it can be done:

20 minutes - heat water to strike temp.
60 minute - mash
5 minutes - lauter
20 minutes - heat to boil
60 minutes - boil
5 minute - 'no chill'. Pour wort into bucket, put on lid and airlock. Store bucket.
Pitch yeast the next day.
---------------------
2 hours and 50 minutes.

 
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Old 07-18-2011, 10:55 PM   #24
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My Lauter's always seem to take longer than I expect.

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:06 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by IXVolt View Post
My Lauter's always seem to take longer than I expect.

I agree. If you only take 5 minutes to drain 1st runnings and also the sparge water, that is super quick.

I sure can't do it in under 15 minutes. 10 min rest for sparge water is usually recommended by most here on the forum.

I think 4 hours could be the right time for me, if I beat that I'm happy.

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Old 07-19-2011, 12:46 AM   #26
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anyone who isn't pitching yeast that day are not qualified to account that as a brewing session. If you add the extra time it takes to sanitize everything the next day or whenever and pitch. You also need to factor in how long it took the wort to get to pitching temperature. Add those factors in then come up with the hour figures

If you are weighing your grist and milling the same day, chilling and pitching your yeast and clean up, there is no way 3 hours is conceivable for five gallons or more of all grain brewing

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:57 AM   #27
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I would typically always hit about 3 hours but it takes me a long time to bring the beer to boil, and awhile to cool it down now that it's summer. I guess typically this is what I'm looking at:

Heat up mash water: 20min
Mash and heat up sparge water: 60min
Two rounds of batch sparge: 25min
Bring to boil: 30min or so
Boil: 60min
Cool down: 30min (I can drop it to about 105F real quick, but takes awhile to get to pitching temp)
Misc. time: 20min

ABOUT 4 to 4.5hrs is my typical brew day.
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Old 07-19-2011, 12:59 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLDBREW View Post
If you are weighing your grist and milling the same day, chilling and pitching your yeast and clean up, there is no way 3 hours is conceivable for five gallons or more of all grain brewing
I get VERY close to 3 hours when I need to. My personal best was 3 hours and 25 min, completely finished other than putting away all my equipment (it has to dry after all).

Step by step:

1. Set up everything.
2. start heating strike water
3. weigh and crush grain
4. start mash
5. start cleaning
6. stir mash, then heat sparge water.
7. run off, sparge, runoff, take reading, start boil. ***
8. weigh hops
9. clean mash tun, dump grains

When boil is complete:
1. set up chilling (two buckets of tap water, third bucket is ice water running through immersion chiller with pump)
2. clean everything else.
3. pour into fermentor, take reading, pitch.
4. done

*** I am soon going to start using a second pot for my sparge water so that I can run-off right into my boiling pot and begin my boil while I'm sparging. I think this will cut about 10 more minutes off when I need to save time.

Trust me, it's doable, but any less than 3 hours and you have to cut mash/boil times, which I won't do. I rarely try to go this fast, but sometimes I brew after work and I have to so I can be done by the time my daughter is going to bed. I brew alone btw, which I've learned actually SAVES time.

EDIT: wanted to add that my friend modified my Bayou burner so that the pot sits only about 1.5 inches off the flames. This not only greatly cut down my time to temperature, but also extended my propane tanks to about 6 batches per.
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Old 07-19-2011, 01:12 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
I get VERY close to 3 hours when I need to. My personal best was 3 hours and 25 min, completely finished other than putting away all my equipment (it has to dry after all).

Step by step:

1. Set up everything.
2. start heating strike water
3. weigh and crush grain
4. start mash
5. start cleaning
6. stir mash, then heat sparge water.
7. run off, sparge, runoff, take reading, start boil. ***
8. weigh hops
9. clean mash tun, dump grains

When boil is complete:
1. set up chilling (two buckets of tap water, third bucket is ice water running through immersion chiller with pump)
2. clean everything else.
3. pour into fermentor, take reading, pitch.
4. done

*** I am soon going to start using a second pot for my sparge water so that I can run-off right into my boiling pot and begin my boil while I'm sparging. I think this will cut about 10 more minutes off when I need to save time.

Trust me, it's doable, but any less than 3 hours and you have to cut mash/boil times, which I won't do. I rarely try to go this fast, but sometimes I brew after work and I have to so I can be done by the time my daughter is going to bed. I brew alone btw, which I've learned actually SAVES time.

EDIT: wanted to add that my friend modified my Bayou burner so that the pot sits only about 1.5 inches off the flames. This not only greatly cut down my time to temperature, but also extended my propane tanks to about 6 batches per.
what about cleaning the boiler, rinsing and drying the buckets and immersion chiller and draining the hoses

I find that just cleaning the boiler and immersion chiller properly then drying, takes a good fifteen minutes. the hops and scum in the boiler and valve takes time to clean right.

 
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Old 07-19-2011, 01:22 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OLDBREW View Post
what about cleaning the boiler, rinsing and drying the buckets and immersion chiller and draining the hoses

I find that just cleaning the boiler and immersion chiller properly then drying, takes a good fifteen minutes. the hops and scum in the boiler and valve takes time to clean right.
Silly, you ain't supposed to count that time. It's routine maintenance. Anybody that claims they can brew from strike to proper cleanup in less than 4 hours is just fooling themselves. And I don't sparge.

 
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