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Old 07-07-2011, 10:13 PM   #11
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While that may be true, I'd still take the "better safe than sorry" approach.
Thats fine. I just wanted to let people know that lots of people are dumping hot wort into food grade buckets, with little to no impact on their beer (that we can differentiate).

Hell some people even boil in plastic buckets with electric heating elements. I would NOT do this, but people do. Google it.


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Old 07-07-2011, 10:19 PM   #12
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I'm on a tight budget, too, and still make partial boils because it's a smaller sized kettle....

Two days before I brew, I boil 2.5 gallons of Campden-treated water for 20 minutes, then seal two gallons worth in those disposable "Glad"-type soup/salad containers (sanitized, of course). Then I freeze them.

By the time I brew, I've got two gallons of frozen, sterile, oxygen-free water that I drop in the kettle after the boil. Just the ice, not the containers.

I can usually bring it down to pitching temperature in under 40 minutes.


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Reason: forgot to mention to freeze them first, and not drop in the containers.
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:19 PM   #13
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I thought when wort is above 140 degrees a chemical known as DMS is created. While boiling that DMS will evaporate out. Once the boil is stopped the DMS continues to be produced and will no longer evaporate. If too much of this is in the beer it will produce off flavors (butterscotch or popcorn). Quickly cooling the wort to below 140 reduces the DMS in the wort and will also give a "cold break" to help remove proteins that can cloud the finished beer. Am I wrong here?
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:23 PM   #14
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I thought when wort is above 140 degrees a chemical known as DMS is created. While boiling that DMS will evaporate out. Once the boil is stopped the DMS continues to be produced and will no longer evaporate. If too much of this is in the beer it will produce off flavors (butterscotch or popcorn). Quickly cooling the wort to below 140 reduces the DMS in the wort and will also give a "cold break" to help remove proteins that can cloud the finished beer. Am I wrong here?

Not sure about that, but my beer doesn't have that flavor and I have no problems with clarity after a good cold crash.
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Old 07-07-2011, 10:34 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waveslider44 View Post
I thought when wort is above 140 degrees a chemical known as DMS is created. While boiling that DMS will evaporate out. Once the boil is stopped the DMS continues to be produced and will no longer evaporate. If too much of this is in the beer it will produce off flavors (butterscotch or popcorn). Quickly cooling the wort to below 140 reduces the DMS in the wort and will also give a "cold break" to help remove proteins that can cloud the finished beer. Am I wrong here?
DMS precursors are boiled off. I no-chill all the time, and I have never had any detectable DMS. That being said, if I am using Pilsner malt (high in DMS precursors) I will boil for 90 minutes rather than my normal 60 minutes.

I also do not think one can tell the difference between a no-chill beer and a traditionally chilled beer. Well, perhaps someone can, but it is certainly beyond the palates of myself or anyone I have let sample the beer.

The cold break happens as it chills, just slowly relative to a fast chill. I often throw everything in the kettle into my Winpak container, hot break, hops and all. It all settles out with time to make clear beer, but a cold crash and sometimes gelatin can shorten the timeline.

Sanitation is key. I do use StarSan before filling with 190F wort, which is probably overkill, as at 190F any of the traditional bugs causing infections are not going to make it. I seal the container and stand it on its head to allow the heat to get to the entire inner surface.

I did my first no-chill batch in November of '09 and have not brought out the chiller since. Brew your own brew.
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Old 09-04-2011, 10:15 PM   #16
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I'm going to go a little against the flow here and advise against this protocol. I presume you're not aerating at elevated temps - as oxygen won't absorb in hot liquid and you don't want hot-side aeration. Also, be aware that as the headspace air cools within the fermenter and "shrinks", outside air will likely enter through the airlock in a sudden gurgle, and unless it contains vodka, you risk gurgling some nasties into your wort. Your fermenter can be sanitized but not sterilized, so by allowing an extended time for organisms to propagate, you're adding a risk factor that IMO is not worth it. My advice, get a cheap IC on Craigslist, but if you can't, then take the prior contributors advice to heart and sterilize meticulously.
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Old 09-04-2011, 10:47 PM   #17
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Just get a 5 gal water container from wal-mart and pour your boiling wort there, seal it, let it chill overnight, transfer to your fermenter, pitch yeast and you all set. Search for "no chill brewing" here and you'll get lots more details

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Old 09-07-2011, 04:59 AM   #18
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Are you okay missing out on the cold break?
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:03 AM   #19
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Using this method will increase the time you have unpitched wort at temperatures that are ideal for bacterial growth, increase levels of DMS and increase haze potential.

That being said plenty of people do it. If you don't have the ability to chill your wort quickly I would go ahead and brew anyways. Maybe pick a style where these defects will be less noticable (ie. NOT a helles or a cream ale).

And now, an Australian man who will claim his Pilsener turns out flawless when he dumps his hot kettle into a cube and pitches it the following week:

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Old 09-07-2011, 04:20 PM   #20
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I used to do "no-chill" brewing. Its simple, cheap and easy but there is disadvantages to this method. I never noticed any DMS or had any problems with infections. Bacteria cannot leave in vacum sealed container where you poured boiling wort. You can leave it for weeks and nothing will happen, as long as its vacum sealed and you don't have any suck back. People little over-paranoid about this issue here
Main problem with doing no-chills is different hop utilization and chill haze. I was struggling with both. You can adjust hop schedule and such but no matter how I tried there was just no consistency untill I said "screw it" and spent $60 on 50' 3/8" copper pipe. Chill haze is a little tougher one to battle. Cold break did formed in a cube and I was pouring crystal clear wort to fermenter next day but my chill haze problems only went away after I started using IC to cool down wort fast.


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