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Old 06-28-2011, 06:47 PM   #11
BryceL
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And don't be afraid to let your wort sit for quite awhile if need be to get the temps down. You can rack to your carboy, cover the opening with sanitized foil, let it cool overnight and then pitch in the morning. Of course this isn't ideal, but probably a better bet than pitching your yeast too warm.

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Old 06-28-2011, 10:42 PM   #12
RavenChief
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
It's going to taste like "homebrew" and by that, I mean the negative flavors that most people attribute to a homebrewed beer when it's not handled properly. Pitching at 75 is too hot, nevermind 88.
For me, my go no go is 75 degrees. As long as I can keep my beer below 75 during the initial days of rappid fermetation, I know that my beer will taste good. I try to pitch at 70 or below, but not much below because I don't like long lag times. I use WLP 007 yeast and it leaves my beer very clean and clear. My yeast is quite happy at 72 degrees and so am I.

Cheers

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Old 06-28-2011, 11:17 PM   #13
eastoak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BryceL View Post
And don't be afraid to let your wort sit for quite awhile if need be to get the temps down. You can rack to your carboy, cover the opening with sanitized foil, let it cool overnight and then pitch in the morning. Of course this isn't ideal, but probably a better bet than pitching your yeast too warm.
i do this all the time, let the wort sit in the mini fridge overnight and pitch a big starter in the morning after a blast of pure O2. works great.

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Old 06-28-2011, 11:18 PM   #14
tesilential
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rycov
its best to get your temps down to the proper level. but i'm sure your beer will be just fine. this is by far not the worst thing that could have happend.
I would actually say pitching high and/or fermenting high IS the worst thing that could happen. My first 6 batches were all ruined from pitching above 75 and fermenting above 70. The 7 batches since have been amazing.

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Old 06-28-2011, 11:22 PM   #15
eastoak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tesilential View Post
I would actually say pitching high and/or fermenting high IS the worst thing that could happen. My first 6 batches were all ruined from pitching above 75 and fermenting above 70. The 7 batches since have been amazing.

i agree. keeping my fermentation temps below 70 and using pure O2 have taken my beer to a much higher level of quality than my first 6-7 brews. it's like night and day really. there are a few things i am working out but those two things have made the biggest difference.

 
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Old 06-29-2011, 11:53 AM   #16
jsweet
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Apr 2011
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I agree that fermentation temp is one of the biggest things you can do to improve your beer (although IME pitch temp is not quite as important as long as it's reasonable and the wort gets down to a good fermentation temp promptly). But using words like "ruined" (as tesilential did) is a bit much, when the OP just pitched a little hot one time. In striving to make the best beer possible, I think we sometimes loose track of the RDWHAHB philosophy a bit.

And hot ferm temps are NOT the worst thing that can happen to your beer. Things that come to mind are: infection, a dropped carboy, somebody else drinking it all...

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Old 06-29-2011, 12:38 PM   #17
two_hearted
 
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It travels back... to the future...

 
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Old 06-29-2011, 12:48 PM   #18
Celticway
 
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I had to pitch high on my last batch, about 80 degrees. This was due to my first summer brewing session since I moved to GA and wasn't expecting the ground water to not be able to cool down enough. I will precool my water next time.
I did however pitch to my conical which has a thermowell in it and is in my freezer set to 64, so it didn't stay warm for long. Lag time was 3 hours and it came out great.

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Old 06-29-2011, 02:36 PM   #19
cg17
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsweet View Post
RDWHAHB


I s*** at acronyms
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:39 PM   #20
jsweet
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http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=rdwhahb

I'm surprised you've spent any time at all on this board and not heard that!

 
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