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Old 06-28-2011, 01:42 AM   #1
pauljmccain
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May 2011
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Hello everyone,

I decided to go with a German theme for my home bar and brewery. Only issue is, I also like brewing styles that aren't German.

In naming these guys, I'd like to stick with the German tradition of just calling them by their style. But when you see "Nut Brown Ale" on an otherwise-German label, it looks a little weird.

Are there any German equivalents for these styles? I'm a fluent German speaker but I don't have enough experience in Germany to know what Germans call them... as if anyone in Germany drinks English beers anyway! I don't want to resort to straight translations but I guess I can if needed.

Any German equivalents for these? I've also attached my 2 minute translations. Feel free to add more you may think of for other styles!

Nut Brown Ale (Braunnussbier?)
Cream Ale (Krembier?)
Dry Irish Stout (Starkirentrockenbier? a little long lol)

Thanks guys!

 
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Old 06-28-2011, 03:54 AM   #2
JohnTheBrewist
 
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Paul, I haven't lived in Germany for 20 years. But when I did, you only found such beers in an English or Irish pub, and a stout was called a stout. These beers are probably a bit more prevalent today, but I'll guarantee that Germans still use the english names.

You could get get a little more creative with German names though.

maybe something like "Eichhoernchen Altstyl"
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Old 06-28-2011, 04:16 AM   #3
barrooze
 
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I made a "Germanic Pale Ale" with all German Hops and a mostly German malt profile and yeast. It turned out great.
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Old 06-29-2011, 01:02 AM   #4
MONKandTUCK
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Nothing wrong with brewing non-German styles, but why is it that you don't like brewing non-German styles?


The Dortmunder Export has been neglected. It's a bigger Pilsner... so it could be compared to an American Pale Ale or Blonde Ale in function. Noticeably different, but serving a similar function.

On the other end of things is the Marzen, it's about as big and malty as a session beer can get w/o being overwhelming.

Hefeweizens are perfect for summer.

Sticke Altbiers are amazing, too, for those who like bigger beer styles!

I don't know about brewing these beers, but you have a wide variety of styles that'll satisfy varying tastes and demonstrate that continental brewing, even Lagers, have more depth than just Beck's.

Like barooze, said, why not also brew a few Pale Ales with Continental ingredients?

Hop Devil and Nugget Nectar are IPA's using Continental malts exclusively. Stone and a lot of other breweries use Magnum for a bittering hop.

 
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Old 06-29-2011, 01:12 AM   #5
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I don't think there are exact German equivalents to a lot of other beers...for instance no German equivalent to an estery english bitter. That's why regions have different beer histories/styles. However, there is also no reason to call a German beer by its english name. Many beers have been translated to German. Polish Grodziskie (polish smoked wheat beer) is called Graetzer in Germany. If you're ok with it, then everyone else will be too.
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Old 06-29-2011, 01:16 AM   #6
pauljmccain
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May 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MONKandTUCK View Post
Nothing wrong with brewing non-German styles, but why is it that you don't like brewing non-German styles?
I love non-German styles, just not english names on my German-looking label. Thanks for the advice guys!

 
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:50 AM   #7
MONKandTUCK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pauljmccain View Post
I love non-German styles, just not english names on my German-looking label. Thanks for the advice guys!
Fair enough. To each his own. I just feel that the German beer styles have been unnecessarily reamed because people associate German beer with pale lager.

Anyway, German's are known for being precise and practical. Their language works a lot like English had. Doesn't the word "stout" have a German homophone equivalent?

 
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Old 11-13-2013, 05:37 PM   #8
skw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MONKandTUCK View Post
Anyway, German's are known for being precise and practical. Their language works a lot like English had. Doesn't the word "stout" have a German homophone equivalent?
Resembling in sound would be"Staude" (= shrub) or "Staub" (= dust).

 
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Old 11-13-2013, 05:39 PM   #9
skw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pauljmccain View Post
Nut Brown Ale (Braunnussbier?)
Cream Ale (Krembier?)
Dry Irish Stout (Starkirentrockenbier? a little long lol)
None of these styles have equivalents in Germany, to my knowledge. My attempts at translating would be:

Nussbraunes Bier
Sahnebier
Trockenes Irisches Stout

 
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