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Old 03-22-2007, 07:33 AM   #1
gfanz
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Default Rice Beer from Scratch

I'm living in the Philippines and would like to try my hand at brewing beer using rice instead of barley. There is actually an enormous variety of rice available (black, red, purple, etc. etc.) and some has been bred specifically for traditional fermented beers/wines.

My first question is whether anyone knows of some information on malting rice? If found information about using "Koji" (a fungus??) to convert starch to sugar in the sake making process, but I haven't found much about malting and then mashing rice to produce sugars.

Does anyone know, or Can anyone help point me toward some information on how I might be able to do malt rice and then mash it successfully?

Thanks, Greg


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Old 03-22-2007, 12:00 PM   #2
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Hrmm good questions. I do admire the fact that you are trying to use what you have available. Koji is used to produce Sake, which in fact might be a better avenue to pursue if you are trying to make a beverage strictly from rice. In beer it is typically used in small percentages of the total grain bill. I am not sure of the process. I think you just cook it to gelatinize it and then can mash it? But don't quote me on that, as I have never used it myself.

Personally I would try developing single grain Sake from each of the rices you speak of. In that case though, since Sake is really considered a 'wine' the wine forum might get you some better/more thorough information.

Cheers

I did look up rice and it must be mashed with base malt. So you either have to cook it, cool it and then add it as a percentage of the total grist or rely on the Koji to work their magic and make Sake...is what the story looks like at this point.


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Old 03-22-2007, 01:13 PM   #3
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Actually sake is not really wine. It is more akin to beer fermentation wise, but also not really beer???

Anyways... Here is another thread that may help some:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=7357

I can not find it at the moment but I had come across a site for make a traditional "Korean beer" once. I believe it used barley in addition to rice, and no enzymes. I will try and find it.

If you want to make sake, that I can help with
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Old 03-22-2007, 06:12 PM   #4
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Well, I did not find the site I was looking for but, this may actually be better for you.

http://www.fao.org/docrep/x2184e/x2184e09.htm

It talks about all of Asia and different rice fementation practices.

Here is what it says about the Phillipines:

Quote:
Phillipines fermentation starter... Bubod... made from glutinous rice (flour) and comes in the form of a small cake. The microorganism is called Mucor, Rhizopus Saccharomyces.
Maybe you can get some of that cultured enzyme somewhere to try.

Hope that helps.
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Old 03-22-2007, 06:54 PM   #5
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Sake is definitely not a wine. Wine is fermented from fruit. Both beer and Sake are fermented from grains. With barley, the enzymes needed to convert the starches into fermentable sugars are created during the malting process, and then the conversion takes place during the mash. No so with rice.

Koji is rice that is cultivated with a mold that contains the enzymes necessary to convert the starches in rice to fermentable sugars. Before they used Koji mold, the enzymes that were used to perform the conversion were obtained from human saliva! People would have the job to put the rice in their mouths and then spit it out, the conversion would then commence. Yuck!

The rice is washed and soaked, then steamed. Koji is added to the rice to begin the conversion. Yeast is added along with more water and Koji, and the whole mixture is the mash and is allowed to sit for about 3-4 weeks. It is then pressed and filtered.

I am in the process of gathering what I need to make my first batch. I'll let you all know how I make out.
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Old 03-22-2007, 07:09 PM   #6
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Good luck with your Sake John. If you need any advice I can try and help. I have been making sake for a couple of years now and it is pretty decent. Still have not made a good dry sake, but it is enjoyable.

let me know
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Old 03-22-2007, 07:18 PM   #7
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Thank you for offering your help. I think I will be taking you up on it soon.
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Old 03-23-2007, 08:42 AM   #8
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I wrote a long reply this morning that seems to have evaporated.

Anyhow, most of it is moot now that I've found this article experiments done on brewing rice by someone in the Philppines.
http://www.pcierd.dost.gov.ph/public...timization.pdf

They seem to go into enough detail that I should be able to replicate their process, but seem to a be a little secretive about "grist:water ratios". I'm not sure what this ratio means. It does seems like it affected how much sugar they were able to get out of their malt, but I assume this ratio would be similar to mashing barley.

I've also located an article in a journal out of Ghana (http://www.ajol.info/viewarticle.php?jid=94&id=7911&layout=abstract)on producing rice malt for sugar syrup, which hopefully will help me optimize everything. I've optimistically paid $9 to have a copy of this article faxed to me, we'll see...

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Old 03-23-2007, 10:22 AM   #9
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I wouldn't waste your time trying to malt rice. Everyone that I've read about trying it has failed. The fat found on the outside of the grain(I forgot what layer or layers) seems to **** up the taste, or it just goes to **** in the malting process.


You can buy the enzymes (amylases, glucoamylase, proteases) needed to convert the gelatinized crushed rice into fermentable sugars. They are used throughout the brewing/distilling industry.


Checkout this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Brewing-Practi...644807&sr=8-29

The book has great information on making beer from little or no barley.
It also covers how to use the enzymes listed above.


The only problem is that I'm pretty sure your not going to be able to by said enzymes on a home brewlevel, but It's definitely worth a look around.

But ask around at your local brewery's to see if they use buy said enzymes and if you can have some

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Old 03-23-2007, 11:38 AM   #10
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Yes, I know that technically it is not a 'wine' hence the single quotes in my post and the explanation...if you find anything on Sake it is called a rice 'wine'. You never see it called rice 'beer' or rice 'beverage'. But for consistency sake, (that is sake not Sake ) if the rest of the world calls it rice 'wine', we should too . It is probably more akin to Kombucha than it is beer.


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