First brewing experience( fail?) - Page 2 - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > First brewing experience( fail?)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-23-2011, 02:33 PM   #11
Skyler914
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by mttaylor1066 View Post
By now, your fermenter is probably bubbling like mad, yes?
you are indeed correct. About 13 hours later its bubbling like crazy. I may have to add more sanitized water to the airlock, cause it s bubbling out of the little holes in the top.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 03:10 PM   #12
Skyler914
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eoin View Post
Others can correct me but an ale yeast fermented at 74 or higher will probably create esters that are unwanted, and will definitely make your beer not taste like it is supposed to. You will still have beer but it won't taste like the beer was intended to taste like.

Let us know if the beer starts to ferment.
I dont know it it makes a difference but the yeast was only pitched at 85, and right after it was put into a cooler set to 70.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 06:10 PM   #13
Hoppopotomus
Cedar Hollow Brewing
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Hoppopotomus's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Ortonville/Oxford, Michigan
Posts: 1,443
Liked 100 Times on 84 Posts


Congratulations on your "second" first batch! When I started brewing, I obsessed about and over analyzed the hell out of everything. Looking back at some of my earlier posts when I first started, I laugh at how paranoid I was of screwing something up. For the most part, the process of extract brewing is very forgiving. As long as your equipment is clean, your ingredients are fresh, and anything that contacts the wort post. boil is sanitized.....very little can go wrong. Of course you have to watch your temps. while steeping grains and before pitching yeast, but after you have made it through the process several times you will develop your own brewing protocols.

I simply go to www.tastybrew.com and plug all of my ingredients into their recipe calculator.....steeping grains, extracts, hops, etc. and print it out. Not only does it give me an organized recipe to follow, but it helps to keep the process organized and your hop schedule in line when your timing your hop additions. It also provides you with traditional ranges for OG/FG, IBUs, SRM, and ABV for the style of beer that you are creating and how your recipe will compare to those ranges. Of course there are much more scientific programs out there like BeerSmith, but what the hell....this one is free.

Yes, I agree that 84 degrees is a little high, but not high enough to destroy our little beer making buddies. As you witnessed, once the temp. approached the ideal range of 68 to 70 'ish degrees, the yeast went to work as planned. Had you cooled your wort a little more into the ideal ranges for ale yeasts, the fermentation may have started a little quicker, but no harm/no foul......all is good and you will have beer! Lots of people do late extract additions to avoid "carmelization" and the extract "twang" aftertaste, which has been a hot topic of debate. I have only experienced off flavors, what many describe at the dreaded extract "twang" in two batches, both of which utilized old LME out of a can. I only use fresh DME for my extract batches and have not had an issue with off flavors since.

Do not brew in fear my friend.....enjoy the process!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 06:21 PM   #14
Hoppopotomus
Cedar Hollow Brewing
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
Hoppopotomus's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Ortonville/Oxford, Michigan
Posts: 1,443
Liked 100 Times on 84 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler914 View Post
you are indeed correct. About 13 hours later its bubbling like crazy. I may have to add more sanitized water to the airlock, cause it s bubbling out of the little holes in the top.
Another couple of words of advice. I use cheap vodka for standard airlocks, so I don't have to worry about boiling/sanitizing water. Also, I had a fun experience with my very first IPA. The fermentation was very vigorous and krausen and hop residue was pushed up into the airlock on my Ale Pale. My wife called me at work freaking out, because the lid blew off of the Ale Pale and showered our entire laundry room with krausen.....she was pi$$ed. For my primary fermenters, I now just use a blow off tube to prevent any obstructions in the airlock. I use a standard spigot, drilled a 7/8" hole in the lid where the rubber grommit was for the standard airlock and purchased a few feet of 3/8" ID tubing. The gasket for the spigot creates an airtight seal and the spigot is put in the ON position during fermentation. The rubber tubing connects to the hose barb on the spigot and the opposite end of the tubing is place in a bucket of water....about 1" below the surface of the water. Works great....and no more beer bombs, especially with higher gravity beers.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 07:14 PM   #15
scrambledegg81
Flocculation Nation
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
scrambledegg81's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Sep 2009
Los Osos, CA
Posts: 1,816
Liked 40 Times on 36 Posts


Fear not--everyone's broken some sort of glass implement in their brew at one point or other (I've done the thermometer bit myself...went & got a quality meat thermometer afterwards to avoid a second wasted batch).

As for worrying, it's part of learning to brew. Even HBT demi-gods like Yoop or Revvy had to get some batches under their belt at one point. It gets easier & less worrisome with time & experience...kind of like being a freshly graduated gynecologist.
__________________
Primary: nada
Secondary: emptyness
Bottled/Fridge: Sierra Nevada Celebration
Bombers/Growlers/Aging: The Abyss, Firestone 19th Anniversary Ale
Kegerator: sanitizer!
Coming Up: something spiffy, most likely

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2011, 02:20 AM   #16
Skyler914
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 13

Wow.. Tons of great info! I appreciate everyones input and willingness to help!

I just got home from work and snuck a peak in the cooler. It's still bubbling away, and when you take a whiff it feels like champagne for the nose, all tingly and whatnot.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 01:06 AM   #17
Skyler914
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 13

It been a couple of day, I went in and checked on it yesterday. No bubbles. I went and checked on it today and still no bubbles. when I took a gravity reading its pretty close to what the instructions say it should be.. any thoughts? should I rack to a secondary?

Reason: iphones sux0rz

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 01:14 AM   #18
Brewmasters Warehouse
 
Brewmasters Warehouse's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2007
Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,818
Liked 29 Times on 21 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler914 View Post
any thoughts? should I rack to a secondary?
Most of the primary fermentation is done but you should leave it in the primary fermenter so the yeast can continue to work their magic on the other by products of the fermentation process. 10-14 days is a good rule of thumb for a beer like SW Pale Ale.

Thanks,

Ed
__________________
Brewmasters Warehouse

Purchase a recipe with Brew Builder and save 10% off the recipe. Use discount code: BBBYO

Become a fan of BMW on Facebook.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 02:14 AM   #19
Tir727
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Atlanta Metro, GA
Posts: 16
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


You are going to find great info here...I can say from experience. And like a wise man said...relax, don't worry, and have a home brew...or a good craft brew until you get a home brew.

My first batches were stressful as others will attest. Hoppopotmus explains "growing up" to be a home brewer quite well. You will screw something up, you will get better, and you will enjoy the hops and malt of your labor...just wait until you try all grain...cheers!
__________________
Kids...making me nuts since 2007!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2011, 07:49 PM   #20
Skyler914
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 13

Today was bottling day. all in all I think it went pretty good. I had a friend from out of town help while he was here... the only thing I THINK I had a problem with is, while bottling I noticed the brew was a little hazy. Im not sure if its because of mixing everything up, or if its because maybe I didnt cool the wort down fast enought. But from what I've read, the haze you get from not cooling the wort fast enough is strictly an asethetic thing.

2 more weeks and I'll be drinking my own brew!

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump