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Old 06-22-2011, 09:53 PM   #1
Skyler914
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May 2011
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I just got finished brewing my second, first batch of beer. Yep, that's right, my second. During the first attempt I was cooling down the wort and when I put in the thermometer it hit the bottom of the pot a little to hard and cracked. All of the little lead weights came out and got all missed up in the wort. Sooooo, that got poured down the drain. And back to brewmasters warehouse I went.
My second batch has me a little nervous as well. I was following the directions step by step until I lost track of what number I was on. Long story short I forgot to put in the second half of the dry extract until the very end. Like the last 5 to 10 min. And this was after all the hops had already been added.... So I added it anyway.... I finished everything, cooled it down to 85 and poured in the yeast...the airlock start to bubble almost immediately and lasted for about 5 min. As it sits it's at 74 degrees and seems to have no activity.

Anybody have any insight as to whether or not its going to be ok? Or if I should just start over?

 
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Old 06-22-2011, 09:58 PM   #2
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The late malt addition should be just fine, lots of brewers do that on purpose to avoid caramelizing the sugar. If your wort was too warm, you may have killed your yeast, shouldn't happen at 85 though. If nothing happens in a day or so, repitch with fresh yeast. You'll be fine.

 
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:02 PM   #3
Clann
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Yep, you will be fine. Be patient and you will have beer. Don't give up yet.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:03 PM   #4
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It will be OK.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:33 PM   #5
TheCrowsNest
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Mar 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler914 View Post
All of the little lead weights came out and got all missed up in the wort. Sooooo, that got poured down the drain. And back to brewmasters warehouse I went.
Skyler, don't dump that brew next time! Those little pellets don't impart anything harmful to your brew and it hurts way more to dump out a batch AND buy a new thermometer - spoken from experience. Just make sure you get all the pellets out before it goes into the fermenter, you probably don't want your beer sitting on them for a month.

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Old 06-22-2011, 11:38 PM   #6
Eoin
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May 2011
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A lot of people do late extract editions and it is common practice, so you are good on that front.

As far as the yeast goes, you shouldn't pitch at 85 because it is a little close to the temps. that can kill some yeast.

But since it isn't and the yeast might have been fine with the 85 degrees they might have went dormant from the drop in temperature From 85 to 74. Even though 74 is still a high temperature, certain yeast might perceive that drop in a sign to go to sleep.

If they perk back up and start working again, you might have some off flavors from the high temperatures.

A common practice is to pitch at 64 and let it rise to 68 and then finish at 70. But that depends on the recipe, but it is a common practice.

What type of beer were you brewing and what type of yeast are you using?

 
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:18 AM   #7
Skyler914
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May 2011
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I'm really glad to hear so many people agree that it going to turn out alright. It makes me feel a whole lot better!




Quote:
Originally Posted by Eoin

What type of beer were you brewing and what type of yeast are you using?
The kit that I got from brewmasters is shoultz-Meyer brewery sw pale ale. They were out of the liquid extract so they gave me the dry extract that makes the same thing. The recipe for it calls for Nottingham but I was told I could use the white labs ale blend wlp060 that came with my original recipe.

 
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:25 AM   #8
Eoin
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May 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler914
The recipe for it calls for Nottingham but I was told I could use the white labs ale blend wlp060 that came with my original recipe.
Others can correct me but an ale yeast fermented at 74 or higher will probably create esters that are unwanted, and will definitely make your beer not taste like it is supposed to. You will still have beer but it won't taste like the beer was intended to taste like.

Let us know if the beer starts to ferment.

 
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:03 PM   #9
mttaylor1066
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I also add a lot of the malt just before the end of the boil.

From what I have read (How to Brew by John Palmer) it allows the wort to better absorb hop flavors/oils.

The first time I tried this with a continuously hopped ale recipe, my friends raved about it being "your best beer ever."
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:07 PM   #10
mttaylor1066
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Also, although what you observed "immediately" probably wasn't fermentation. That would be highly unusual to get fermentation that quick. More likely some release of CO2from the wort or expansion of airspace due to an increase in temperature.

The inactivity at first is just your yeast building up oxygen before getting fully into the swing of fermenting sugars. By now, your fermenter is probably bubbling like mad, yes?
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