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Old 06-21-2011, 03:17 PM   #1
Supergravi
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Mar 2011
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Hello all -
*
Sort of new at brewing and love it.* But, as with anything, I HAVE to know the inner-workings and the why/how*of what I am doing.* 'Just becuase'* doesn't cut it for me. So....
*
Fermentation - simplisticly speaking, yeast eats sugars.* By-products are CO2 which escapes and alcohol.** Good so far?** If one lets his brew go to full attenuation, are all the sugars eaten and all the yeast dies?* After attenuation, if I added more sugar or more yeast, would fermention begin again?* (adding one or the other, not both).
*
Carbonation - currently, I am adding priming sugar before bottling.* CO2 is obviously created and can't escape, so it carbonates my beer.* But that process is not fermetation, correct?* What happens to the priming sugar during this process/conditioning?* How much does the priming sugar affect taste?* (am I also backsweetening with a priming sugar?)



 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:27 PM   #2
mlyday
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The bottling sugar is fermenting and creating c02 which has no where to go so it goes back into solution.



 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:28 PM   #3
Supergravi
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Mar 2011
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Is the fermentation in the bottles not changing my gravity and alcohol content?

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:33 PM   #4
Revvy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supergravi View Post
Is the fermentation in the bottles not changing my gravity and alcohol content?
The FERMENTATION of 5 ounces of priming sugar in the bottle only adds .003 gravity points to your gravity. So that alcohol content increase is really negligible. But it is fermentation nonetheless.
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:37 PM   #5
PantherCity
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It is affecting your gravity and ABV but only a tiny bit. It is probably with in the margin of error of you hydrometer. If you really what to know the inner workings of brewing go buy "How to Brew" by John Palmer and read it cover to cover. Then you will want to read more books. And more books. And More.

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:37 PM   #6
Supergravi
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Mar 2011
Memphis, Tn
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Awesome. That's what I wanted to know. So, the yeast really never dies - just goes dormant?


 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:37 PM   #7
mlyday
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Once again I was beaten to the punch, by revvy.

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:46 PM   #8
Supergravi
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Mar 2011
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Great stuff, guys. Thanks. Just ordered the book. This stuff is addicting!

 
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:52 PM   #9
Supergravi
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Mar 2011
Memphis, Tn
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One clarification: the yeast goes dormant after attentuation correct? - does not die or breakdown. Attenuation is when there are no longer sugars to consume?

Chemically speaking, what does stabilizing do? I know it stops the yeast, but what is chemically happening? Can fermentation be reactivated after stabilizing with something like sorbate?


 
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:59 PM   #10
MachineShopBrewing
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Nov 2009
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Quote:
One clarification: the yeast goes dormant after attentuation correct? - does not die or breakdown. Attenuation is when there are no longer sugars to consume?
The yeast does go dormant, but it does die eventually when it runs out of energy reserves. This can take weeks or months depending on how well it was treated.

Quote:
Chemically speaking, what does stabilizing do? I know it stops the yeast, but what is chemically happening? Can fermentation be reactivated after stabilizing with something like sorbate?

I have never seen any reason for one to use any kind of stabilizer in a beer. When the yeast is done consuming what it can, what you are left with is the flavor, body, and sweetness of the beer. You can adjust all of those things by recipe formulation, mash temp, yeast selection, etc...

No need to ever use a stabilizer.



 
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