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Old 06-20-2011, 02:29 AM   #1
asterix404
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Okay, so this is obviously a fairly broad subjected question and from the reading material quite long and lengthy, but what I am looking for basically what temperature does to the mash and what temps I should try to hit for particular styles.

Typically I hit about 150 for my mash and keep it constant to about 149 for about 90min for my typical mash schedule. This is for all styles, all the time. Sometimes I hit 152, but then I cool it down a bit to 150.

I am reading designing great brews, and I see mash ranges from 147-160, does 147 produce less dextrinous beer then say, 150? Does 2 degrees make a ton of difference between say, 150 and 152, or 154 and 156? If I wanted a sweeter beer, I should most likely mash at higher temperatures, is there a temperature which really is just too much and how sweet are we talking? He tells us that Scottish Ales were mashed about 155, so if I mash, say an IPA should I expect that same intense sweetness from the finished beer?

This is one aspect which I have a hard time finding information about beyond the phrases:
"Keep the mash at 150" (This I believe was the recommendation from Palmer) and "The higher the mash temp, the more dextrinous the wort will be".

Thank you all.

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:46 AM   #2
gtpro
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basically there are two enzymes in the grain that chop the big starches down to smaller sugars, the one that produces larger [harder to digest] sugars is most active at ~157F and the one that produces smaller sugars is more active at ~149F.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:11 AM   #3
arturo7
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Read this http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14.html


I recommend that you buy the book.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:20 AM   #4
BigEd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arturo7 View Post
Read this http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14.html


I recommend that you buy the book.
I wholeheartedly agree. If you read and understand basic texts on the subject first you will better understand the topics covered in more specialized books.

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:32 AM   #5
SethMasterFlex
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It doesn't necessarily mean "sweeter" the higher you mash, it means more longer chain dextrins will be present in the final product and thus have more body and mouthfeel. Sure a higher FG may sometimes be sweeter than a lower one, but this may be more dependent on the malts you use and the yeast strain you select as opposed to just the FG.

For example, mashing low with a low-attenuating yeast and mashing high with a high attenuating yeast may yield you the same FG, but the higher mashed one will be heavier and have a fuller mouthfeel.

+1 on the How To Brew

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 06:47 AM   #6
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Old 06-20-2011, 12:52 PM   #7
asterix404
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I actually do own that book. I have a feeling that I didn't read it when I started brewing because it seemed really complicated or I didn't understand all the terminology. I do remember the part about specific enzymes being most active at specific temperatures, and he actually goes into great detail about this (So does Palmer). I just wasn't expecting a crowding out affect, I will have to reread these parts.

Honestly I didn't quite understand the metaphors, I do know about complex carbohydrate chains and that enzymes basically chew down the chain one by one, but this video is really really good.

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:14 PM   #8
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somebody beat me to linking Bobbys video, Its 20 minutes but explains it very well with props to boot.
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:33 PM   #9
asterix404
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Yea, that was an excellent video. It was very very dry reading about it. I do remember the alpha and beta amalaise but I think I fell asleep and just... well... his explication is very very good. Sounds like the 150-152 range is about right for almost everything unless I want a very particular affect. Thanks all!

 
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:39 PM   #10
Sheldon
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I actually understood the whole discussion. I am impressed with myself.

 
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