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Old 06-16-2011, 04:30 PM   #1
darkmastiff
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Hi i want to do a Dry Irish Stout with extract and specialty grain i have the extract and all the specialty grains except roasted barley, my supplier saids that no have idea of when they have it, the most of the recipes uses roasted barley but, is absolutely necessary for a good irish Stout? Can i used another grain or simply i don´t used?

thanks in advanced for your help

and again sorry for my english

 
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Old 06-16-2011, 04:37 PM   #2
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I did a stout without roasted barley once (I didn't have any) I didn't replace it with anything, but it still turned out very nice. It was hard to nail anything that I didn't like about it. Hitting the right fermenting temperatures, good yeast and all the other fundamentals are usually much more important than most recipes adjustments, in my opinion.

 
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Old 06-16-2011, 04:44 PM   #3
MazdaMatt
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Stout - RB = Porter... nothing wrong with that, it just won't be a stout.

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Old 06-16-2011, 05:07 PM   #4
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if you can't get roasted barley, then I would replace it with some black malt (aka black patent malt) and/or some dark roasted chocolate malt.
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Old 06-16-2011, 05:20 PM   #5
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You could try roasting your own:

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Old 06-16-2011, 06:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MazdaMatt View Post
Stout - RB = Porter... nothing wrong with that, it just won't be a stout.
This was my understanding as well. I would think adding black malt or chocolate malt in place of roasted barley would also indicate porter. But it's you're brew. Call it what you want to call it
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Old 06-16-2011, 06:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qhrumphf View Post
This was my understanding as well. I would think adding black malt or chocolate malt in place of roasted barley would also indicate porter. But it's you're brew. Call it what you want to call it
I don't think it is that black and white. Maybe I'm wrong, but my take on porters and stouts (and all their variations) is that they are essentially on a continuum of dark, roasty ales. The lines are blurry. However, most stouts probably do contain roasted barley. Since the OP cannot get roasted barley, the next best thing for him to do is to replace it with some other highly kilned malt, like black or chocolate. Will this be a stout? I guess it depends on how it tastes - if you don't know the recipe, what would you call it? It will be dark and roasty for sure, even if not a "classic" dry irish stout.
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Old 06-16-2011, 06:55 PM   #8
hudsonj6
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I was curious about the difference between stouts and porters, since both can be very dark and have similar flavors. I did some searching around on here about a week ago and the consensus seemed to be that stouts have at least a half pound of roasted barley for a 5 gallon batch and porters either have less or no roasted barley.

 
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Old 06-16-2011, 07:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
I don't think it is that black and white. Maybe I'm wrong, but my take on porters and stouts (and all their variations) is that they are essentially on a continuum of dark, roasty ales. The lines are blurry. However, most stouts probably do contain roasted barley. Since the OP cannot get roasted barley, the next best thing for him to do is to replace it with some other highly kilned malt, like black or chocolate. Will this be a stout? I guess it depends on how it tastes - if you don't know the recipe, what would you call it? It will be dark and roasty for sure, even if not a "classic" dry irish stout.
Lines are definitely blurry. However, I'm coming from the view that while both are dark and roasty, the there are differences in the flavors and roasted barley imparts a specific roasty flavor that is a core element of a stout (at least a modern stout). Adding black or chocolate in addition to roasted barley is one thing, but eliminating the roasted barley entirely is something else. The OP is obviously free to use whichever ingredients he wants (or has available), and call it whatever he wants, and I'm sure it'll be great beer either way. But I also don't know what final flavor he's expecting. If I were to brew a stout, and swap out the roasted barley for black or chocolate, I'd be expecting something more along the lines of a porter. That said, substituting is probably the next best thing (in which case I'd go with black malt), unless, as another poster suggested, roasting his own is a possibility.
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MazdaMatt View Post
Stout - RB = Porter... nothing wrong with that, it just won't be a stout.
That's not true.

A typical Dry Irish Stout is 70/20/10 2-row, flaked barley, and roasted barley. You take away that 10% roasted barley and it's just 2-row and flaked barley. That isn't a porter at all.

 
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