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Old 06-14-2011, 05:37 PM   #1
Palefire
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Sort of a stupid question, but for those using Pol's method of sealing and installing a heating element, does one absolutely need the JB Stik? Pol has it holding the PVC coupling to the element, which he does before potting the element with the JB Weld. If so, is there another product people would recommend?

I ask because while JB Weld is both cheap and easy to find, JB Stik is neither of those things, at least 'round these parts. I'm cool with the basic electrical aspects of the build, but I know nothing about these materials. Would something like Crazy Glue even work (just to hold the PVC coupling to the element), or do I need a more specialized product? Is there another cheap tube of stuff I could get?

Not a very interesting question, I know ... apologies.

Thanks in advance for any help!

 
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Old 06-14-2011, 05:54 PM   #2
samc
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I used a flexible rubber pipe coupling (saw it on HBT, can't take credit -drats!) that has stainless clamps on each end. You can find them at Home depot or hardware store. IMO the JB weld thing is not needed, I did that on my first build and I had a problem that required me to take it all apart, a time waster and a mess. After hooking up the wires to terminals I put some liquid electric tape on the connections and then a strain relief and cap on the outboard end of the coupling.


Not sure if it was this one, you need to check sizes:
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

 
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Old 06-14-2011, 05:56 PM   #3
Gwitz
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Well im sure you could just use JB weld to attach everything, that's what i did. The advantage of JB stik is it is putty and wont run. Thats a little problem i had with mine, JB weld likes to run, but i just picked the runs off while it was still kinda tacky and problem solved.

But ya, use whatever you want to attach the PVC to the element, model glue comes to mind, it has an acid in it that bonds the plastic together. Or any putty type epoxy would work.

 
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Old 06-15-2011, 02:54 PM   #4
wh4tig0t
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Columbus, Ohio
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the problem i have with the JB stik is that as it gets older, it crumbles. On one of my elements the coupling can turn on the whole JB weld block that the contacts are encased in. maybe I did something wrong with the JB stik, but in my opinion all JB weld would probably be the best. you could just put some masking tape around the coupling to keep it from leaking while it cures.

I'm thinking maybe for my next one I will use the epoxy in the self mixing syringe just to seal the bottom of the coupling, then use some kind of cap or strain relief to seal the other end, and that way i can get in there and fix the electrical connections in the future, or change the element w/o making the cord shorter, or the cord w/o throwing away the whole assembly. HTH

 
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:21 PM   #5
Walker
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I didn't use any JB Stick.

<....>

I just deleted an attempt to explain how I did mine. I cannot describe it in a clear way, but it involved zip-ties to clamp the coupling to the element base. Then poured in thinned JB Weld.

My buddy just slid the coupling on and wrapped the outside in electrical tape before pouring in the JB Weld.

You just need to have some way of keeping the coupling held snugly to the element so that the JB Weld doesn't ooze out while you wait for it to cure.
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:27 PM   #6
Walker
I use secondaries. :p
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wh4tig0t View Post
I'm thinking maybe for my next one I will use the epoxy in the self mixing syringe just to seal the bottom of the coupling, then use some kind of cap or strain relief to seal the other end, and that way i can get in there and fix the electrical connections in the future, or change the element w/o making the cord shorter, or the cord w/o throwing away the whole assembly. HTH
My first attempt was exactly this. I used JB Weld to attach the rim of the coupling to the heater and then put a coupling, and a bushing, and a strain relieve on it.

Here's a crappy pic, but with a little silicon caulk around the outside for extra measure.



The JB Weld ended up cracking since there was so little of it there holding the coupling to the element. The wires were exposed. Attempts to repair it would end up breaking after a while.

For unrelated reasons, I had to replace my heater element a few months ago and I just used the zip tie and poured in the JB that time.
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:45 PM   #7
kpr121
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I just did mine this weekend. I used all JB Weld, mixed the first goop a little thicker (more red hardener than black steel), painted it around the rim of the pvc and used 2 small clamps to hold it all together. I let that harden up for a couple hours, then came back and poured the rest of the mixture from the tubes (which was thinner) into the open end to pot the connections. Worked pretty well and looked a hell of a lot cleaner than my first fiasco with a heating element.

 
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:00 PM   #8
passedpawn
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I taped the contraption together and poured some 3M 2-part epoxy in there (had it sitting around). Worked great x 2.

If you decide to use something "laying around", make sure to check the dielectric constant of the material. Big numbers (high voltage withstand), or large resistance numbers, are good. If the material doesn't list any dielectric property, don't use it.
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