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Old 03-19-2007, 09:57 PM   #1
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Okay...I've been pondering something and I'm not sure of where to find the answer....

Say I do a protein rest at 122 (or so) and want to step up to 152. What if I drained off some of the mash water (no grain, just water) after the protein rest was complete, heated that to a near boil, and added it it back to the mash to get the mash up to temp? Am I going to kill some (or all) of the enzymes by doing that?

I would think this would be a decent solution as well if you missed a mash temp by a few degrees and wanted to bring the temp up without sacrificing the stiffness of the mash by adding more water.

I think what I'm asking here is sort of similar to just recirculating the mash water--but not really.

Inputs?
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:02 PM   #2
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I did this recently when I had too much in my 5 gallon mash tun to get my temps up to sacc temps. What I did was to draw off a couple of Qts of recirculated wort and raise to 150f and let stand for 30 minutes and then boiled it and added that to get my temps up to sacc temps.
Worked ok for me. Did a iodine test and everything was kosher.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:11 PM   #3
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Doesn't that make it a decoction mash, then?

From this website: http://www.strandbrewers.org/techinfo/decoct1.htm
In decoction mashing, a portion of the mash is removed from the mash tun and is transferred to a boiling pot. This portion is called the decoction, and it is heated slowly to bring it to a boil. After boiling for a period of time the decoction is added back to the main mash, thereby raising it's temperature. In this respect, the decoction mash is similar to the step mash or temperature controlled mash. For example, the initial mash temperature and volume of the decoction can be chosen so that the temperature rise goes from the protein rest temperature to the sacharification rest (starch conversion) temperature. This would be called a single decoction mash because only one decoction was made. An additional decoction can be made to raise the mash temperature again to mash out (double decoction) or a total three decoctions (triple decoction) could be used to achieve an acid rest - protein rest - sacharification rest - mash out profile.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:15 PM   #4
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You're doing a decoction without the decoction if that makes any sence. There should still be plenty of enzymes left for conversion.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper Chick
Doesn't that make it a decoction mash, then?
No, because a decoction is taking out a good bit of the thick part of the mash. It is also boiled.

I only want to take some of the mash water and not quite boil it.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dude
No, because a decoction is taking out a good bit of the thick part of the mash. It is also boiled.

I only want to take some of the mash water and not quite boil it.
Ok, now I understand- just the wort to be, not the grain. Aha! Sorry, I'll go back to lurking and finding out what the experts have to say.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:25 PM   #7
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The liquid part is called a thin decoction, usually done at mashout. Since you're not really boiling it for a period of time, it's not really a decoction, but at those temps the enzymes would be denatured.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:47 PM   #8

Are you wanting to do this because your mash tun is too full to infuse? I think it would be easier and more time efficient to have the infusion water ready at the correct temp and just add it to raise the temp.
My biggest problem is I have been using an electrical immersion element turkey fryer and it takes way too long to heat the water between steps, so I have to heat the water for the both the first and second step to the hotter temp and add water for the first step but also add cool water to hit the lower temp. This sets me up to have the second step water hot enough in time.
Too much of a PITA so I ordered a Banjo burner that should arrive Thursday. Hopefully that will solve this problem.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:51 PM   #9
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No, my main reason for doing this is that in a step mash you'll sometimes end up adding too much infusion water to the mash, and that will affect other things (fermentables, mouthfeel, etc), so If I could keep my mash thickness where I like it, this would go a long way in helping me make better beer.

I am starting to get into stuff like this--liek not using cara-pils anymore--trying to dial in teh right mash thickness and temperature to compensate. It will make me a better brewer in the long run.

If you've ever done a step mash in a cooler, you'll know why I'm asking about this process.
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Old 03-19-2007, 10:53 PM   #10
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I know your logic. I've been there. I would think it would work fine as long as you don't have a grain bill that's heavy on the adjuncts and specialty grain.
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