Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Suggestions for controller
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-23-2011, 09:33 PM   #31
AdamCanFly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 147
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Wow P-J! You rock! I've been looking at Kal's website thinking I would never be able to afford an electric brewery. This puts it in reach for sure!

Jsguitar, what kind of RTD or thermocouple are you going to use?


AdamCanFly is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 10:00 PM   #32
P-J
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 3,335
Liked 294 Times on 231 Posts
Likes Given: 496

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamCanFly View Post
Wow P-J! You rock! I've been looking at Kal's website thinking I would never be able to afford an electric brewery. This puts it in reach for sure!

Jsguitar, what kind of RTD or thermocouple are you going to use?
Just seeing you response pleases me more than you could imagine. I'm glad that you can use it for a build.

Not Jsguitar, but, I'd recommend a RTD probe from Auber Instruments.
Liquid Tight RTD Sensor, 4” probe, Weldless Fitting
The one in the link can be directly mounted to a kettle. My reason for using a RTD probe is that they are more accurate and, unlike the type K probe, they are very easy to install and wire. (The type K probes use 2 different metals for the leads. If you add plain wire to the leads you create another sensor junction at that connection.)

Hope this helps.


P-J is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 10:04 PM   #33
AdamCanFly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 147
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Perfect! Thanks! Turns out I have a Grainger right down the street too!
AdamCanFly is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2011, 10:16 PM   #34
P-J
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 3,335
Liked 294 Times on 231 Posts
Likes Given: 496

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamCanFly View Post
Perfect! Thanks! Turns out I have a Grainger right down the street too!
They also carry the 3PDT center off switch.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/NKK...e-Switch-2TNZ7
3PDT/on/off/on/25A
P-J is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 03:40 AM   #35
ZooKeeper
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: STL MO
Posts: 79
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by P-J View Post
ZooKeeper,

The diagram you asked for is done. I changed the original in this thread to add a second indicator light to show which element is selected. The master power switch request will jump you build expense quite a bit. That change would require an additional switch and a contactor. I feel it is really not necessary. Everything is controlled through the existing switches. (You should never be working inside the controller while it is plugged in anyway. The EPO is designed to kill all power in the event of an emergency. It will do just that but you MUST have a GFCI circuit breaker either in your mains panel or in a sub panel feeding your brewery.)

I added the circuits for implement the Auber Instruments Timer. How you use it and wire its output is totally up to you. The ASL-51 Timer Manual can be found With This Link.

Now for the diagram: (Click on the image for the full scale image - printable on Tabloid paper 11" x 17")

I hope this helps you.
P-J, good comments on the master switch. As always, awesome work & thanks for the quick turnaround!

I plan to start putting together my parts list this weekend and hope to do the build this summer.
ZooKeeper is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 10:58 PM   #36
jsguitar
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jsguitar's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 1,123
Liked 104 Times on 82 Posts
Likes Given: 694

Default Major Update!

Ok, I got it put together!

I can't test it fully yet for a couple of reasons. I had a leak in a sight glass and am waiting on the replacement for that and I also damaged my element in the boil kettle because my hole was just a tiny bit too small. It got stuck so I ended up using a piece of wood and a hammer to get it out. It looked liked I knocked the base loose so I ordered a replacement.

I also have to clean and organize my basement in order to make space in the laundry room. Not looking forward to that.

I tested it with my multimeter a lot along the way, checking continuity at every point before powering it up and checking voltage at the outlets once it was powered. I'll need to hook up the rtd probe later and figure out the pid to check everything, but at this point everything seems perfect.

I had some small tragedies with the hole saw. I'm an idiot with a hole saw apparently and it took me a while to realize I needed to make a template by cutting a hole in a piece of wood to guide the thing. I had only drilled a pilot hole and clamped a piece of wood behind it at first. I broke the first pilot bit in the mandrel trying to make a hole for the GFCI outlet....it snapped and the saw jumped. I didn't learn. I then broke another I had, and then bent drill bits I used as guides. I finally got it cut and then proceeded to destroy the back of the control panel! I finally got it right after that with the template and it was a breeze.

Anyway, you'll see that I filed, sanded, and painted the gouges in the GFCI and control panel. For the GFCI, I used the gray primer and silver hammered metal paint that I was using for the element boxes. For the control panel I used a flat black 2000 degree auto exhaust paint. It worked well and I used it on the front too to clean up some smaller scratches and nicks.

Disclaimer: I'm not an electrician, so do not use my electrical work as a guide. This is dangerous! Consult an electrician!

Pic 1: hole saw tragedy on back of control panel
Pic 2: damaged bits
Pic 3: template
Pic 4: filed and sanded gouges out
Pic 5: final back of panel after painting


More pics in next post.
Click image for larger version

Name:	tragedy.jpg
Views:	1087
Size:	110.3 KB
ID:	28402   Click image for larger version

Name:	tools (.jpg
Views:	1072
Size:	133.4 KB
ID:	28403   Click image for larger version

Name:	Jig.jpg
Views:	1074
Size:	86.6 KB
ID:	28406   Click image for larger version

Name:	after filing and sanding.jpg
Views:	1080
Size:	99.7 KB
ID:	28407   Click image for larger version

Name:	after paint.jpg
Views:	1086
Size:	83.0 KB
ID:	28408  

jsguitar is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 11:09 PM   #37
jsguitar
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jsguitar's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 1,123
Liked 104 Times on 82 Posts
Likes Given: 694

Default More!

Ok, so here are more

Pic 1: Initially, I put the RTD panel connect a little too close to the cord grip. I found a metal washer, clamped it to a spot a little bit down and to the left so that it covered the old hole too and then I drilled it out. I painted the washer as well. I got it right where I wanted it and it covered the previous spot.

Pic 2: same

Pic 3: bottom inside with terminal strips mounted--I didn't leave much room at the front which made wiring the switches challenging but it all fit

More pics coming!
Click image for larger version

Name:	moved rtd down diagonally.jpg
Views:	1061
Size:	70.9 KB
ID:	28413   Click image for larger version

Name:	RTDmoved:washer.jpg
Views:	1068
Size:	59.4 KB
ID:	28414   Click image for larger version

Name:	Bottom inside.jpg
Views:	1074
Size:	116.5 KB
ID:	28415  

Reason: forgot a couple of things
jsguitar is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 11:23 PM   #38
jsguitar
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jsguitar's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 1,123
Liked 104 Times on 82 Posts
Likes Given: 694

Default And more.....

Pic 1: P-J's e-stop. Twisted and soldered the resistors and covered with heat shrink at P-J's suggestion. I actually covered them with another layer of heat shrink to cover them completely after this as well to beef it up in order to run it with the other wires.

Pic 2. Soldering RTD connects. Followed advise on forum to tin each, connect, and solder. To get the wire fully in the tiny connector, I used a small knife to help push it into the pin as I soldered. This was a pain. I used two vises for this.

Pics 3-5: various wiring shots. I used panel mount fuse holders which made things more difficult but will be easier in the future. I was going to run the 10 gauge wire to the fuses and the 14 gauge after but the fuse holders I had had solder lug holes that actually were too small even for the 14 gauge. My understanding is that since the fuse is the first thing the wire goes to, that this is an ok practice. To get the wires in the holes for soldering I had to drill them out just a tiny bit. They are all rated at 15 amps despite their wimpyness. It was one thing after another like this!
Click image for larger version

Name:	P-J's E-stop.jpg
Views:	1090
Size:	117.6 KB
ID:	28417   Click image for larger version

Name:	solderingrtd.jpg
Views:	1073
Size:	113.9 KB
ID:	28418   Click image for larger version

Name:	wiring.jpg
Views:	1078
Size:	135.1 KB
ID:	28419   Click image for larger version

Name:	wiring 1.jpg
Views:	1081
Size:	135.7 KB
ID:	28420   Click image for larger version

Name:	wiring 2.jpg
Views:	1081
Size:	117.9 KB
ID:	28421  


Reason: spelling
jsguitar is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2011, 11:32 PM   #39
jsguitar
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jsguitar's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 1,123
Liked 104 Times on 82 Posts
Likes Given: 694

Default and one more.....

Power!

I don't have the probe hooked up here and haven't done anything with the pid yet. I checked the outlets and switches with the multimeter. I'll need to have the pid working to check for the full voltage at the element I gather since one of the legs runs through the ssr, but the pump outlets worked, pid is obviously on, the element switch worked, the e-stop worked instantly. I checked the power between one of the legs on each 240 outlet and ground while switching and that seemed to work perfectly.

I'll probably play with the PID and probe tonight after some food. This has been a challenging project. I can't tell you how many times I cut off an already crimped connecter because I didn't have the length just right. A lot of fun though. I'll update when I set up the pid and test with probe.

Thanks again P-J for your guidance on this. I really appreciate it!
Click image for larger version

Name:	power!.jpg
Views:	1067
Size:	68.7 KB
ID:	28422  
jsguitar is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2011, 12:13 AM   #40
jsguitar
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jsguitar's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Overland Park, KS
Posts: 1,123
Liked 104 Times on 82 Posts
Likes Given: 694

Default final wiring shot

Here's a final wiring shot I forgot to add. I added a ground wire to the top of the box and put a big piece of heat shrink on the wires going to the top to better protect the wires when opening.


Click image for larger version

Name:	wiring4.jpg
Views:	1054
Size:	124.2 KB
ID:	28423  
jsguitar is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Love Controller Issue bbucc Electric Brewing 8 05-23-2011 04:03 PM
PID temp controller? rod734 Electric Brewing 13 04-29-2011 06:08 PM
Electric HLT temp. controller Steven9026 Electric Brewing 5 02-04-2011 12:11 PM
On/Off Power Controller? thelorax121 Electric Brewing 14 01-29-2011 08:29 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS