Priming Belgian Ale - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Priming Belgian Ale

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-22-2011, 08:29 PM   #1
Graeme
Recipes 
 
Mar 2009
Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 237


I'm bottling my belgian specialty ale next week, and I'm just wondering if there is any difference in regards to priming it? I've read many threads regarding priming certain belgian beers particularly high gravity ones where people are adding yeast at bottling, I presume this would be a case where the beer has conditioned for several months and more yeast is needed to prime? Mine finished out at 7.7%, does gravity also dictate this or am I ok to bottle this as
normal.

Cheers!!

Graeme



 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2011, 08:34 PM   #2

I've made only one and it was a big tripel (1.082-1.007) mine is carbonating SLOWLY! It's been nearly a month and there nowhere close to the targeted 3.25 volumes I'm gunning for. I suspect it may take months. Based on this experience, I will be pitching fresh yeast in my bottling bucket next time.


__________________
Fermenting: Lambic and Dry Orange Blossom Mead
Conditioning: Brett Drei Golden Strong
Next: Nut Brown, Wee Heavy, & Rye IPA
Drinking: Brett - Aussie Blonde, Black IPA, Belgian Stout, Munich Helles

Follow My Brewing Excursions at:

http://<br /> <font size="5"><font ...</font></font>

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Dracon...58343357538490
___________________
Draconian Libations

 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 10:57 PM   #3
Graeme
Recipes 
 
Mar 2009
Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 237

Just bumping this. anybody else wanna chime in? cheers!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2011, 12:19 AM   #4
petep1980
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
petep1980's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Posts: 1,900
Liked 14 Times on 14 Posts


I did one recently and I added primary yeast at bottling. I started it for about 24-48 hours, and added about 1.5 times as much priming sugar as I usually do.

It primed brilliantly. I believe the primary/bottling strain was Belgian ardennes.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2011, 01:04 AM   #5
Graeme
Recipes 
 
Mar 2009
Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 237

Thanks for the info!

Guys, just trying to get as much info as I can on this as I need to bottle at the weekend. Is there a point when adding yeast adding yeast at bottling really NEEDS to be done? Is this determined by how long the beer has been stored (In my case three weeks) or by the OG (1.063) in my case. It finished out at 1.004. This is not by any means a huge beer and what I'm really asking is will the priming this beer as I normally do with just corn sugar produce satisfactory carbonation?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2011, 01:49 AM   #6
petep1980
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
petep1980's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Posts: 1,900
Liked 14 Times on 14 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Graeme View Post
Thanks for the info!

Guys, just trying to get as much info as I can on this as I need to bottle at the weekend. Is there a point when adding yeast adding yeast at bottling really NEEDS to be done? Is this determined by how long the beer has been stored (In my case three weeks) or by the OG (1.063) in my case. It finished out at 1.004. This is not by any means a huge beer and what I'm really asking is will the priming this beer as I normally do with just corn sugar produce satisfactory carbonation?
From Brew Like a Monk:

Must you go beyond the standard homebrew practice of using whatever yeast remains in beer? If you condition at particularly cold temperatures (such as close to freezing) or for a long period (beyond a month), then it is worth considering.............Conditioning takes place in a harsh environment. The yeast left in your beer has already been through a war. It isn't necessary to use the same yeast as in primary. Trappists do that because they always have it ready. Generally, an alcohol-tolerant strain will do better but is not required. If you don't have a warm room that is truly warm, consider a yeast that performs better at lower temperatures.

I wanted a very high level of carbonation, close to 4 volumes. So I re-used the yeast. It was available, the style is cloudy, it lends itself well.

I have also bottle yeasted with those little cooper's yeast packets from their lager kits. The results as far as carbonation are incredible. The beer is cloudy as hell though.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
priming for 3-4 gal of esb Sheldon Bottling/Kegging 2 11-09-2010 02:21 PM
Priming in Keg? xrobevansx Bottling/Kegging 12 02-03-2008 03:19 PM
Priming with DME kevinrmclean Bottling/Kegging 11 02-01-2008 02:23 PM
Priming with DME-How much? gnets99 Bottling/Kegging 7 07-15-2007 05:20 AM
Keg Priming highwayman Bottling/Kegging 8 07-20-2006 11:19 PM


Forum Jump