Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Mash tonight, Boil tomorrow?
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:47 AM   #1
enginerd
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Default Mash tonight, Boil tomorrow?

Can it be done?

It's getting late in the day and I don't think I can make it through the entire brew. The thought crossed my mind to just do the mash tonight and save the boil for the next day. I figure with respect to sanitation, it should be okay since I'd boil everything the next day anyways.
Are there any dangers with this?
Any thoughts would be great.

I decided to fail conservative and just brew the whole thing tomorrow.


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Old 03-12-2007, 04:59 AM   #2
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I have seen this question a few times. I think I would like to conduct myself an experiment and try to brew two batches exactly the same except mash one and save the wort and brew it the next day. Its probably been done, who knows it may be better. I may try it one day


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Old 03-12-2007, 02:08 PM   #3
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I'm still trying to understand the chemistry of it, but I think if you delay your boil you really have to make sure you do a mash out to stop the conversion process in the wort. Otherwise you'll end up with way dry brew.
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:30 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M
I'm still trying to understand the chemistry of it, but I think if you delay your boil you really have to make sure you do a mash out to stop the conversion process in the wort. Otherwise you'll end up with way dry brew.
That would be my biggest concern too. I think Bobby sums it up pretty well here.
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:32 PM   #5
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I've heard, although I have (thankfully) no experience with this, that if the mash goes sour overnight, the damage is done; boil it in the morning or not, you're going to have a soured beer.
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Old 03-12-2007, 02:37 PM   #6
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Mashing overnight used to be the preferred method of doing it as per HB guru Dave Line in the 80s. Malt was less modified then, and the longer mash time helped with that. However, even back then, it was an 8 hour mash and not a 24 hour. Do it first thing in the morning and you'll be fine. Of course based on the timeline of this thread, this is all moot now. But you'll know for next time.
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Old 03-12-2007, 03:45 PM   #7
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As long as the temperature stays above 120F, it shouldn't sour. Hit it with the mash-out water and you'll de-nature the enzymes, plus give the mash more of a margin.
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Old 03-12-2007, 03:58 PM   #8
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Interesting...

http://www.hbd.org/brewery/cm3/recs/04_21.html
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Old 03-12-2007, 06:56 PM   #9
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The tricky thing with mash souring is based on a few factors. One is the amount of lactobacillus already present on the malt. Usually it is sufficent to start the souring process but depending on how much a leg up they have determines how long things need to go. It is certainly not an exacting process and needs to be gauged each time you do it. Another factor is temperature. Lactobacillus can survive up to 150 F from what I have read, I try to shoot to kick start the process at around 135 F and let the covered vessel stay in an insulated area. It drops down over the course of time so who is to say when the peak activity is. Your mash will sour, this is pretty much garaunteed but I think in general you can help delay the process by draining off your wort and dropping the temps....ie put it in the fridge to cool. It will really keep them from doing their thing. The other thing you can do is drive up your temp up to beyond their tolerant range (60 F - 150 F) to help kill them off and then bring them down to where they don't prosper.
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Old 03-12-2007, 07:28 PM   #10
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Although way beyond the scope of my abilities since I'm not going for any style that calls for sour, this has been helpful.
It sounds like I would be ok to drain off and refrigerate until the morning. So - I have a new trick to put in my bag in case the situation ever comes up again.
Cheers


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