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Old 05-05-2011, 03:02 AM   #1
Upship
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When bottle conditioning my beer should I do so at the same temp as fermentation (single stage) or secondary/lagering temp, or at a different temp?

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:09 AM   #2
MalFet
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Something in the vicinity of 70F for three weeks, typically. Cooler will take longer.

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:21 AM   #3
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MalFet already answered. End thread...
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:56 AM   #4
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3 weeks at room temp should be good enough, that's what I've done with no problems.

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:11 PM   #5
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Thanks, not to keep beating the dead horse, but that go for lagers too? I mean true lagers.

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:17 PM   #6
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The 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that we recommend is the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.

Temp and gravity are the two factors that contribute to the time it takes to carb beer. But if a beer's not ready yet, or seems low carbed, and you added the right amount of sugar to it, then it's not stalled, it's just not time yet.

Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

If a beer isn't carbed by "x number of weeks" you just have to give them more time. If you added your sugar, then the beer will carb up eventually, it's really a foolroof process. All beers will carb up eventually. A lot of new brewers think they have to "troubleshoot" a bottling issue, when there really is none, the beer knows how to carb itself. In fact if you run beersmiths carbing calculator, some lower grav beers don't even require additional sugar to reach their minimum level of carbonation. Just time.

That is the same whether it is lagers or ales....
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:07 PM   #7
jonmohno
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What about 85 degrees?Been thinking of moving to a cooler spot downstairs becuase of irregular higher temps.

 
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:14 PM   #8
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Ok, how about this one: beers that were at room temp then plunged into the refrigerator (the beer recipient didn't know about the carbing process) and then pulled back out again. Would those bottles resume conditioning when they reached the 70ish degree range? Or would the fridge temps cause the yeast to flocculate and cease carbing?

@jonmohno - I'd guess that 85* might be at the top of or close to above the range your yeast would live in. Though it probably depends on the yeast strain. But I don't have any practical experience to back that up. Just what I've read here really.

 
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:30 PM   #9
Darklordenron
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I've been doing 62f fermentation for 2 weeks and 62f conditioning for 2 weeks for a few batches now. I have to say, I'm way happier with the taste than when I used to do 70f for 2 weeks on both.. Way less esters and off flavors, way better taste, cleaner fermentation, the list goes on and on.

 
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Old 05-11-2011, 01:12 AM   #10
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Im just talking botteling temp.Havent heard much about higher temps.YOu hydrate yeast around 90 degrees, so i think it would move along carbonation fast but dont really know anything about doing this.Im not sending any in the mail in the summer because im paranoid about the heat and jostling around and blowing up or something also.

 
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