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Old 05-04-2011, 07:44 PM   #1
crfdvm
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I know this has been overkilled, but I just hooked up two commercial kegs to my keezer (36-38 degrees) off a single regulator (set to 9psi) split by a dual manifold. The lines are 3/16" and 5 feet. The Double IPA is flowing perfect and has little to no air bubbles in the line. The Orange Wheat is collecting quite a bit of small air bubbles and gas pockets in the beer line. The shanks are run through the collar and all lines are internal. Why is the one line collecting bubbles, but the other isn't? Should I just increase the length of the one line?

Any help would be appreciated. I was just wondering why one would be running fine on the same system and the other having problems.

Thanks

 
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Old 05-04-2011, 07:55 PM   #2
heferly
 
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your commercial kegs have to have the psi set to the brewery's carb levels...otherwise, the co2 will come out of solution.

you can try and look up the carb levels, or give them a call to see what they recommend.
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Old 05-05-2011, 04:11 PM   #3
crfdvm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heferly
your commercial kegs have to have the psi set to the brewery's carb levels...otherwise, the co2 will come out of solution.

you can try and look up the carb levels, or give them a call to see what they recommend.
I called the brewery and they recommended between 10-12 psi. I increased the psi to 11-12 and I am still getting gas in the Orange wheat line. It starts out as small bubbles from the coupler connection which form into large pockets of gas over a few hours. The dbl IPA hooked up to the same manifold is pouring perfect, with no bubbles or gas pockets in the line. Any further thoughts. Could it be a faulty keg? Thanks

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:21 PM   #4
heferly
 
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i would still guess it's co2 coming out of solution, but you should still check all your hoses to make sure air isn't getting into your lines...and even if your lines are in your keezer, they could still warm up if there's no circulation (small fan would help)...

BUT, i still think it's co2 getting out of solution...you need to find out their carb levels (2.5 volumes, for example)...that way, you can set your psi to match that, based on your keezer temp. The 10-12 psi recommendation doesn't really help you.
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:48 PM   #5
budman
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I would try swapping the lines and see if the ipa inherits the same problem as the wheat.

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:52 PM   #6
JuanMoore
 
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Hefe's are typically very highly carbonated, like 3.5-4.5 volumes as opposed to the 1.5-2.5 volumes typical for an IPA. My guess is that the wheat is just way more carbonated than the DIPA. Without a secondary reg and a much longer line to serve them at different pressures, you may need to de-gas the wheat to get it to pour decently. It might not be carbed to style that way, but at least you'll be able to pour it. The other option is to increase the pressure and line length to suit the wheats carb level, but then the DIPA will be overcarbed, and if you don't have check valves for each line you'd still have issues until both kegs reach equilibrium.

 
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Old 05-05-2011, 06:53 PM   #7
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It's possible they may have carbed the wheat to 4.5 volumes of CO2. Not uncommon for a wheat. Switching the lines is a good test as mentioned above. Look for an obstruction in the line or disconnect, or a bad connection that's allowing air to infiltrate your beer line. Cheers!!!
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Old 05-05-2011, 11:57 PM   #8
crfdvm
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Thanks for suggestions. I will try swapping lines to see if the IPA has problems on that line. I would assume that if the wheat was carbed to a higher level, the brewer would have rec higher psi and longer line for the wheat. But he rec 10-12 psi on both. I'm going to try some things this weekend and see. I have a secondary regulator in the mail. That I may have to dedicate to the wheat.

 
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Old 05-07-2011, 10:09 AM   #9
crfdvm
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Update: I added the secondary regulator and increased PSI to 15 on Orange Wheat and it seems to have resolved the bubbles and burps in the line. It comes out pretty quick and causes some foaming at the faucet. I plan on increasing the length of the line to increase resistance. I have a feeling this will be the solution.

Thanks to everyone out there that knows what good beer tastes like, how to get it in your glass and are willing to share what they know. Cheers!

 
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