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Old 05-04-2011, 01:55 AM   #1
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I've changed my beer lines to the mcmaster 3/16" LLDPE hard plastic beer lines. I'm using something like 25' of line and I like my beer a bit more carbonated than average. I'm trying to go with 18 psi at 45 degrees. Problem is that the beer comes out of the lines using my perlick faucets extemely foamy (about 3/4 glass foam) and then after the foam settles, the beer is pretty flat. Seems like the co2 comes out of solution in the beer lines and totally kills the carbonation. The beer is good if I take the pressure back down to 10 psi (or lower) and then pour. Any ideas for me? I can't imagine that I need even longer lines!


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Old 05-04-2011, 03:42 AM   #2
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you are using too much co2. back it down to 10 or 12. I know there is a chart for PSI and temp but never relied on that. If get PSI above 15, i get the same issue you do. Also, you might just need to let it sit under CO2 pressure for a while longer before pouring.


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Old 05-04-2011, 10:28 AM   #3
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I don't think my beer is carbonated enough at 10-12psi. Other people use higher pressure than that but don't experience this issue. Gotta be a better solution
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Old 05-04-2011, 10:37 AM   #4
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Do you have a fan circulating the air to ensure that your lines are staying cool?
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Old 05-04-2011, 01:58 PM   #5
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Simple enough. Your beer line is too short. You increase your pressure, you need to increase your line length. The line you're using is known as a 'low foam line' (uses backpressure generated by the small inside diameter of the hose to help hold the foam in check) -how long is your line? Regardless, add a couple to few more feet and your foam levels should lower, and that will mean the CO2 is still in solution.
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Old 05-05-2011, 02:55 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Nightbiker View Post
Simple enough. Your beer line is too short. You increase your pressure, you need to increase your line length. The line you're using is known as a 'low foam line' (uses backpressure generated by the small inside diameter of the hose to help hold the foam in check) -how long is your line? Regardless, add a couple to few more feet and your foam levels should lower, and that will mean the CO2 is still in solution.
did you even read the OPs original question???
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Old 05-05-2011, 02:58 AM   #7
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butlerton brings up a great point about temp. if you pour cold beer in a warm glass it will produce excess foam. also, if you have a lot of beer line at room temp it can cause excess foam.

By the way. i carb all my beer at 10-12 psi, ater 4 days its perfect. There are a lot of people who "force carbonate" their beer at high pressure(25-30psi) and some sahke the **** out of their cornies. The pros and cons of this have been discussed a few times. I prefer the couple of days at 10-12 mysel.
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Old 05-05-2011, 03:03 AM   #8
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i use 6' of 3/8" line at about 40 degrees and 11 psi. i couldn't imagine using 25'; my kegerator would be full of nothing but hose. try backing down the hose length and the pressure
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:26 PM   #9
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i use 6' of 3/8" line at about 40 degrees and 11 psi. I couldn't imagine using 25'; my kegerator would be full of nothing but hose. Try backing down the hose length and the pressure
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Old 05-06-2011, 06:06 PM   #10
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I bet somewhere there is a sharp edge or gap that is causing a lot of turbulence. I'd take a close look at the faucet end, including taking that apart to check for rough spots and edges


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