Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Help with starter (won't decant)
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-30-2011, 01:35 PM   #1
thrust
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: state college, pa
Posts: 59
Likes Given: 7

Default Help with starter (won't decant)

Hi folks,

I just made a starter of White Labs WLP099 (Super High Gravity) for an upcoming (hopefully) brew of a Russian Imperial Stout.

However, in my other attempt at making a starter (Wyeast 1272), I was able to decant to a very clear separation; not so with this batch of starter.

I've included a picture (below) to indicate my perceived problem.

My starter wort was the standard 200g of DME in 2L of water. I pitched 2 vials of WLP099 and left it on a stir plate for 18 hours.

In the picture, it has been in the fridge for ~12 hours.

Is this normal for this yeast?

Thanks!






thrust is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:03 PM   #2
daugenet
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SC
Posts: 305
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I would say that it is just the difference in flocculation characteristics between the two strains.


daugenet is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:06 PM   #3
thrust
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: state college, pa
Posts: 59
Likes Given: 7

Default

Thank you for the reply. So, if I'm going to step up to a larger starter, can I decant? In other words, I would like to pitch this starter into another 2L of wort to get my cell count up to the 450 billion needed.
thrust is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:12 PM   #4
daugenet
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SC
Posts: 305
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Your best option (this is only my opinion) would be to

1. decant what you can and save the liquid
2. take your decanted liquid and allow the yeast to settle out more
3. pitch the settled yeast into the next starter
4. decant both when brewing is done and pitch them in
daugenet is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:13 PM   #5
daugenet
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SC
Posts: 305
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

ah i see you are in state college. i was just up that way a couple weeks ago for a job. good luck!
daugenet is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:17 PM   #6
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,812
Liked 2874 Times on 1699 Posts
Likes Given: 3511

Default

Then just don't bother decanting. Decanting or not decanting is really just a preference, and in the case of low flocculating yeast, you often are just better dumping the whole starter in. It's really just a small amount of light beer being added to 5 or more gallons of wort- it's not going to affect the finished product at all.
__________________
Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew
Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 02:19 PM   #7
daugenet
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SC
Posts: 305
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Then just don't bother decanting. Decanting or not decanting is really just a preference, and in the case of low flocculating yeast, you often are just better dumping the whole starter in. It's really just a small amount of light beer being added to 5 or more gallons of wort- it's not going to affect the finished product at all.
I agree but I didnt know if he had enough room in his next container to put his whole first starter in.
daugenet is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2011, 05:24 PM   #8
yodalegomaster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: MN
Posts: 420
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Be careful with this yeast, at Low fermentation temps it puts off no Esters. I made a Barlywine with this yeast. it's clean and bright and very boring. But I was looking for some tell tale esters, becasue I was thinking it was going to be a british barleywine. My other choices was an american barleywine but becasue I didn't use American Hops it doesn't fit there either. My point here is that RIS usally have some yeast esters, to provide complexity and intrest. I would think your going to have to ferment very warm to get the british esters to come out. This means your going to produce alot of fusal alcohol's along with the esters.

I know many people would love a very clean barleywine like I made, but's It's not want I was expecting. To me its just a good alcohol delivery device. I usually make my RIS's with Irish Yeasts to get some good ester flavors so I get a much more complex brew.

Ps: if you put 450mil of this yeast in a 10 gallon RIS 1.010 at 80 degrees expect to have a geyser after a couple of hours.
yodalegomaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2011, 01:59 PM   #9
thrust
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: state college, pa
Posts: 59
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by daugenet View Post
Your best option (this is only my opinion) would be to

1. decant what you can and save the liquid
2. take your decanted liquid and allow the yeast to settle out more
3. pitch the settled yeast into the next starter
4. decant both when brewing is done and pitch them in
This is basically what I've ended up doing:

1.) Decanted the original stater and saved the runnings.
2.) Made an additional 2L starter using the yeast from the first decanting.
3.) I will pitch the entire 2L **new** starter, plus any settled yeast from the original decanted runnings.

I'm making a big (OG 1.132) beer, so I don't really think any of the non-decanted starter will affect the final taste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by daugenet View Post
ah i see you are in state college. i was just up that way a couple weeks ago for a job. good luck!
Best of luck! Did you interview with PSU, by chance?

It's beautiful, and a very nice place to live! My wife and I have been here for just under six years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Then just don't bother decanting. Decanting or not decanting is really just a preference, and in the case of low flocculating yeast, you often are just better dumping the whole starter in. It's really just a small amount of light beer being added to 5 or more gallons of wort- it's not going to affect the finished product at all.
This is basically my final plan. I just need to ensure I reach my needed cell count.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yodalegomaster View Post
Be careful with this yeast, at Low fermentation temps it puts off no Esters. I made a Barlywine with this yeast. it's clean and bright and very boring. But I was looking for some tell tale esters, becasue I was thinking it was going to be a british barleywine. My other choices was an american barleywine but becasue I didn't use American Hops it doesn't fit there either. My point here is that RIS usally have some yeast esters, to provide complexity and intrest. I would think your going to have to ferment very warm to get the british esters to come out. This means your going to produce alot of fusal alcohol's along with the esters.

I know many people would love a very clean barleywine like I made, but's It's not want I was expecting. To me its just a good alcohol delivery device. I usually make my RIS's with Irish Yeasts to get some good ester flavors so I get a much more complex brew.

Ps: if you put 450mil of this yeast in a 10 gallon RIS 1.010 at 80 degrees expect to have a geyser after a couple of hours.
I'm rethinking my yeast selection a bit, but hopefully all is not lost with the WLP099.

I'm brewing a five gallon batch, but I'm using a 12 gallon bucket for primary. Hopefully, I can avoid the need for a blow-off setup! Nevertheless, I'm anxious to see what happens!
thrust is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2011, 01:10 AM   #10
daugenet
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SC
Posts: 305
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

No I was out that way working on the paper mill. :-) It is a nice campus though. Similar to where I went.


daugenet is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To decant your yeast starter, or just pour it all in? Ben_Persitz Fermentation & Yeast 34 03-06-2012 01:41 PM
24hr starter - Too soon to cool & decant? dunnright00 Fermentation & Yeast 4 03-20-2011 08:26 PM
Starter question - enough time to decant? imtrashed Fermentation & Yeast 9 02-21-2011 01:39 PM
Lager starter: didn't decant rocketman768 Fermentation & Yeast 2 09-27-2010 02:36 AM
When to decant starter? illinibrew04 Fermentation & Yeast 2 12-01-2009 04:06 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS