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Old 04-27-2011, 05:26 AM   #1
belmontbrew
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Oct 2009
Belmont
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When I brewed my first batch two years ago, I tried a sip of wort and nearly spat it out.

Today, I found myself downing the entire contents of my hydrometer sample jar. I was like, "That is some good wort!" And I'm a partial boiler, so this is really wort syrup (1.090+).

I feel like I passed some kind of bizarre homebrew milestone.

 
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Old 04-27-2011, 08:35 AM   #2
Fantastical
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Sep 2010
Kelowna, B.C.
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Hehe! I only like the stuff because I know what it turns into. I couldn't imagine drinking wort because I liked the taste of it.

Overly bitter overly sweet juice... hehehe

 
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Old 04-27-2011, 08:26 PM   #3
plaidpaint
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Oct 2010
Toronto, Ontario
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I like it when it's sweet, pre-boil, but after the hops go in, I generally avoid it until it's done

I've contemplated making my own sweet wort syrup to put on my special beer-batter pancakes. Perfect brew-day breakfast

 
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Old 04-27-2011, 08:28 PM   #4
maffewl
 
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Jan 2011
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I usually taste the wort to get an idea of the hop flavor... I try to ignore the sweetness.
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Old 10-10-2011, 06:43 AM   #5
Luposian
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Oct 2011
Sierra Vista, Arizona
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I'd like to figure out if making wort can be done in such a way as to be like the stuff I've bought, called Malta. I love Malta (tastes like Post Grape-Nuts, to me)... but how to make it without a bunch of complicated steps...???

 
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Old 10-10-2011, 06:53 AM   #6
29thfloor
 
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I always thought Malta was basically just unfermented beer. Maybe just skip the yeast, crash cool right after the boil and then force carb in a keg?
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Old 10-10-2011, 09:05 AM   #7
Luposian
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Oct 2011
Sierra Vista, Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 29thfloor View Post
I always thought Malta was basically just unfermented beer. Maybe just skip the yeast, crash cool right after the boil and then force carb in a keg?
I'm not familiar with beer-making terminology...

What does "crash cool right after the boil" mean? You mean, quickly cool down the "brewing" (boiled/steeped) malted barley? But that's known as mash or mashing, isn't it?

I guess to help with the concept understanding, if the ground malted barley were tea leaves, you'd steep the tea leaves in hot water right? Same principle, in a sense?

 
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Old 10-10-2011, 10:30 AM   #8
bernerbrau
 
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Quote:
I guess to help with the concept understanding, if the ground malted barley were tea leaves, you'd steep the tea leaves in hot water right? Same principle, in a sense?
In a sense, but you're missing a step.

First the malted barley is mashed - ground coarsely and held at 139-159 degrees for an hour, then drained and rinsed with 170 degree water. This is your wort. The initial temperatures are pretty crucial because they are the range at which the enzymes in malted barley are most active in converting starch to sugar. Most novice brewers start by mixing malt extract with water at this stage (which is just pre-mashed, dehydrated wort), and then graduate to "all-grain" brewing later.

Either way, wort is then boiled for 1 hour, to eliminate nasties and to add hop flavor. If you were planning on making carbonated wort in a keg, you would just need to boil for 15 minutes to kill the nasties.

Then, you would transfer (via siphon) all the wort over to a (cleaned and sanitized) bucket or carboy, and place in a refrigerator (or freezer temperature regulated to just above 32 degrees, so the wort doesn't freeze, as it doesn't have the alcohol to keep it from freezing) for a few days. In theory, this will force a lot of hazy proteins to congeal and drop out of solution and clarify the wort for you. In practice, I have no idea, because wort isn't beer (yet).

Finally, you would siphon once again to a (cleaned and sanitized) keg, and pressurize with CO2 at serving temperature and pressure for 2 weeks.

But if you're unfamiliar with brewing terminology, it's going to be very expensive to buy all the equipment necessary to do all that. For one thing, kegging is essential. If you tried to bottle carb "malta", you would end up with a sticky, violent mess from all the bottle bombs. And possibly a divorce.

My recommendation would be to start by learning to make beer, and when you have the necessary equipment to brew all grain and force carb in the keg, THEN try making "malta".

 
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Old 10-10-2011, 05:32 PM   #9
bernerbrau
 
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You know what? Scratch that. No need to even get that complicated. Get some liquid malt extract, a 2 liter of club soda/seltzer, and a wide tip funnel. Pour off some of the seltzer, add the funnel, fill with extract, cap, shake well, then set aside in the refrigerator for an hour or two for the CO2 to settle back in. Bam. Easy malta. Might be more expensive than store-bought, but at least you can say you made it.

 
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