Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Winners Drawn!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > How to Remove a Heineken Threaded Keg Valve (not retained by a spiral ring)
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-18-2011, 04:20 AM   #1
outside92129
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
outside92129's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 1,219
Liked 60 Times on 48 Posts
Likes Given: 28

Default How to Remove a Heineken Threaded Keg Valve (not retained by a spiral ring)

I've found many instructions on how to remove the valve assembly from standard Sankey 15.5 gallon kegs, but nothing for Heineken threaded kegs without the spiral retention ring. Miller Brewing has a very similar valve but there are some differences. I'll go into cutting off the top in another thread as the Heineken threads complicate things. I mostly followed Winemaker2's post about Miller kegs (see link for his post):

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/how-...al-ring-76393/

The first step is to relieve pressure, either tip the keg to the side and press the button, or drill a hole in the top. The valve can now be unthreaded, use a screwdriver and hammer on the tabs to turn it. A few taps should be enough to get it started and you can do the rest by hand.


One completely unthreaded you'll notice that the valve assembly still won't come out, there is an safety catch inside that prevents it from flying out. If you're coordinated enough you can depress the valve button while pulling it out. An easier way is to make a tool like below. It's 1 3/4" wide and 1/8" thick with a 3" bolt, a nut soldered to the bottom, and a hole in the middle of course. The main difference between the Heineken tool and the Miller tool is that the Heineken button is in the middle whereas the Miller ball is offset.


To use the tool, slip the flat steel under the tabs and make sure it's set well as there is going to be a fair amount of force on it. Screw in the bolt about 2" to disengage the safety catch. You can then withdraw the valve assembly by pulling on the bolt. You can also see the safety catch at the top in this image:


Here's the complete breakdown of the valve parts. I already cut the cage part off the top in preparation for keg top removal.


Thanks all! I've been having a great time reading all the posts over the last several months and finally found a way to contribute back to the collective

-lance


Click image for larger version

Name:	bits.jpg
Views:	5700
Size:	62.9 KB
ID:	24255   Click image for larger version

Name:	inuse.jpg
Views:	5313
Size:	57.0 KB
ID:	24257   Click image for larger version

Name:	tool.jpg
Views:	5525
Size:	58.5 KB
ID:	24258   Click image for larger version

Name:	valve.jpg
Views:	6453
Size:	62.2 KB
ID:	24259  
outside92129 is offline
filosk8 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2012, 08:21 PM   #2
CGJesse
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: , TEXAS
Posts: 6
Likes Given: 5

Default Threaded keg valve

Great post! I was a handed a free 5gal wine keg last night and after spilling a little blood I figured it out and was able to remove the threaded valve assembly successfully. Thankfully, I accomplished it without damaging the parts because I am going to reuse it for beer storage and to serve from. Not wanting to go through what I just did every time I need to open and clean it, I've been scouring the internet for an appropriate tool. Turns out there is a tool available for about $90 - $100 but it looks like it is designed for the American style Sanke kegs. I don't think it'll work with the threaded (European?) style because you have to push down on the ball to disengage the safety latch and pull up on the assembly at the same time. I love your ingenuity and will probably be taking your design and modifying it to include a T-handle. Well done!


CGJesse is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2013, 06:02 PM   #3
drive45
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 76
Default

I wanted to add to this post from my experience. If you happen to have a tap for the keg, it is really easy to open it up. Once you unscrew the valve, you can put a dime over the relief button. Then, put the tap on the valve like you would attach it to pump a beer. It will take some force as it will push on the dime instead of the relief button. The dime will push down the metal piece around the button and compress the second spring. You may need to hold the valve when you twist the tap onto it as it will just spin. At this point you can pull the whole thing out connected to the tap as the safety will not catch.

Obviously, the key is actually having the tap which many people won't have. I got lucky as mine came with two. I would be happy to send someone one of mine if they ever need it as long as they agree to pass it along to someone else who might need one.

So, to anyone with an S keg, just hit me up with a PM and a tap is yours as is a super easy method to open the keg (you will have to provide the dime).
drive45 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2013, 06:41 PM   #4
JRems
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Mahopac, NY
Posts: 2,230
Liked 60 Times on 52 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

If you get the spear out once and want to reuse it for homebrew, remove the safty catch so you can screw it in our out easily.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
Simcoe smells like 10 cats pissing on a pine tree. It's awesome.
JRems is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 05:46 PM   #5
BBBF
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,201
Liked 67 Times on 54 Posts
Likes Given: 32

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drive45 View Post
I wanted to add to this post from my experience. If you happen to have a tap for the keg, it is really easy to open it up. Once you unscrew the valve, you can put a dime over the relief button. Then, put the tap on the valve like you would attach it to pump a beer. It will take some force as it will push on the dime instead of the relief button. The dime will push down the metal piece around the button and compress the second spring. You may need to hold the valve when you twist the tap onto it as it will just spin. At this point you can pull the whole thing out connected to the tap as the safety will not catch.

Obviously, the key is actually having the tap which many people won't have. I got lucky as mine came with two. I would be happy to send someone one of mine if they ever need it as long as they agree to pass it along to someone else who might need one.

So, to anyone with an S keg, just hit me up with a PM and a tap is yours as is a super easy method to open the keg (you will have to provide the dime).

I was trying to do that trick with a nickel and it wouldn't work. I resorted to using screwdrivers. I did build a tool like the OP, but I couldn't see the latch, so it wasn't much help for the first attempt.
BBBF is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2013, 11:07 PM   #6
drive45
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Marietta, GA
Posts: 76
Default

Just a heads up, a nickel is slightly too big. I double checked. You need a dime or it likely won't work. I didn't fully test with a nickel, but it covers up a second ring which I think keeps it from compressing the right spring.
drive45 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2014, 10:19 PM   #7
BigTuna
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: New Haven, CT
Posts: 129
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

I have a Hofbrauhaus 13.5 Gal Sanke Euro 'S' keg. I'm not able to release the catch on the valve. I have tried using the tap and a dime which seems like it's too big and it didn't work. The dime actually fits on top of a lip that is attached to the bigger spring, not the center spring that (I think) i'm supposed to press down. I've also tried using small washers and stacking them around the edges of the smaller center piece to compress it and push it down. I was able to compress it at least 1/2 inch but the safety catch still did not disengage. Besides making the tool that the original poster did, I have no clue where to go from here. I'm not sure that tool would help since i've already pressed the thing a TON. Any help would be great.
BigTuna is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2014, 06:27 PM   #8
filosk8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1
Likes Given: 1

Default

Worked like a charm.
filosk8 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2014, 02:40 PM   #9
OhCrap
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Galway
Posts: 623
Liked 50 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I had a tap head for it and at first couldn't get it in far enough... I use the small extension bar for my mini ratchet..it worked first time...I also tried it using the extension attached to the rachet...it wasn't as easy as you had to keep it still but it worked easy enough


__________________
Beer
1 is good
2 is better
3 is enough &
4 ISN'T half enough
OhCrap is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to Remove a Miller Threaded Keg Valve (not retained by a spiral ring) Winemaker2 Bottling/Kegging 36 01-08-2015 10:41 PM
Can't remove poppet valve from post (Firestone) Prionburger Bottling/Kegging 19 11-02-2014 01:43 AM
How to remove Heineken clear plastic Sticker label? harper Bottling/Kegging 6 12-28-2012 01:32 AM
How to remove pin lock relief valve? abellote Bottling/Kegging 7 04-30-2011 02:06 AM
Threaded Bottles Sgt. Major Bottling/Kegging 11 07-27-2008 12:42 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS