Used and IPA yeast in my pilsner.... - Home Brew Forums
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:14 AM   #1
Kam
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I've brewed a few batches (6) and to this point have thoroughly enjoyed the out come of my brews. The batch I currently have in my primary (I usually rack to a secondary) is made with a Coopers Hopped Pilsner extract. After brewing it up I realized I used a Coopers IPA labeled yeast. Did I mess up using this yeast? What should I expect?



Reason: mispelled word in title

 
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:40 AM   #2
smagee
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I'm not entirely sure of your concern here, but if I'm guessing correctly, you're worried that the IPA yeast will have an adverse affect on a brew using pilsner extract? If so, I wouldn't be too concerned. I don't know anything about Cooper's IPA yeast itself, but I'd expect it to be something fairly neutral like US-05 or WLP001 anyway. What beer were you brewing with it?



 
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:09 AM   #3
Kam
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Being fairly new to this I wasn't sure if there was some major difference in the yeast taste once finished. For this brew I used the Coopers hopped Pilsner, a golden light dry malt and added an ounce of US sterling hops to my wort the last few minutes of my boil. It's kicked off nicely. Just was curious as to the effects of using an "IPA yeast". Thats what the yeast pack was labeled which I noticed after the fact. I had it as an extra from an earlier brew...

 
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:37 PM   #4
paraordnance
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it will be nothing like Pilsner thats for sure, more like Pale Ale if you used Ale yeast. From what I know Coopers uses same ale yeast (yellow packets) for all of their kits. It will be beer, just not true Pilsner. My first ever batch was a Brewhouse Pilsner kit with Coopers yeast, was drinkable but can't say it was great. For most beer styles yeast responsible for about 80-90% of flavour profile. I can take exactly same grain bill and use different liquid yeast to make Pale Ale, Munich Helles, Pilsner and Kolsch. All 4 will taste very different due to specific yeast. So its not about a kit you using, its about the yeast for the most part. You will learn that first hand soon

 
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Old 04-08-2011, 02:05 PM   #5
tomheff
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The Coopers Pilsener does use a true lager yeast strain. If fermented at lager temperatures it would produce a smoother beer. Using the IPA yeast will probably produce a beer that is more fruity in profile. Since you are in Hawaii you may not have adequate temperature control for fermenting a lager so it may be just as well.

 
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Old 04-08-2011, 02:12 PM   #6
tomheff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paraordnance View Post
it will be nothing like Pilsner thats for sure, more like Pale Ale if you used Ale yeast. From what I know Coopers uses same ale yeast (yellow packets) for all of their kits. It will be beer, just not true Pilsner. My first ever batch was a Brewhouse Pilsner kit with Coopers yeast, was drinkable but can't say it was great. For most beer styles yeast responsible for about 80-90% of flavour profile. I can take exactly same grain bill and use different liquid yeast to make Pale Ale, Munich Helles, Pilsner and Kolsch. All 4 will taste very different due to specific yeast. So its not about a kit you using, its about the yeast for the most part. You will learn that first hand soon
Coopers uses about 5 different varities of yeast in their kits. Of course the Original Series uses only the Original Series yeast. That is the same yeast that is used in the Brewhouse kits.

 
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Old 04-11-2011, 06:07 PM   #7
Kam
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Thanks for the response folks, looks like it's all part of the learning...if not a "true" tasting pils it should be interesting to taste the results. This has pushed me into learning more about the variety of yeasts. Just gives me another variable to work with, which is a good thing. When I sample it I'll pass my findings along. At any rate it won't go to waste!

 
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Old 04-11-2011, 06:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kam View Post
Thanks for the response folks, looks like it's all part of the learning...if not a "true" tasting pils it should be interesting to taste the results. This has pushed me into learning more about the variety of yeasts. Just gives me another variable to work with, which is a good thing. When I sample it I'll pass my findings along. At any rate it won't go to waste!
Aloha Kam,
I'm out in Wai`anae. What are you doing about temp control? Right now I have lots of 1/2 gal jugs of ice that I swap twice a day w/fermenting bucket in a big tup and covered w/a towel.
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Fermenting: Black IPA
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Bottled conditioning Old Glory Stout
Bottled in the refe: American Imperial Stout
Bottled in the refer: Dunkelweizen
Largering in refer: Oktoberfest

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Old 04-13-2011, 05:51 AM   #9
Kam
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Alohas C-Rider,
I'm over here on the Big Island at about 2500' elevation so temperature is pretty good for brewing. Typically 70-75 day and 60-65 night. I usually keep my primary start in my inside pantry (stays about 68 around the clock). Once the biggest of the fermenting (bubbling) stops I bring out to the garage, cover the pail with a towel to keep the light off it for the rest of the time (temp goes from 65-78) if it goes hotter than that I crack some windows. I try to keep it under 78. Seems to be working good so far. I think I saw a pic of your setup here somewhere and seems you're doing the most reasonable thing. After 3 or 4 days you may be able to just get away with water and wet towels, let evaporation do it's cooling thing and maybe just as important make sure its always shaded. The airflow in the open area you have will help a lot. For me (and I'm fairly new to this) I think its most important to keep it coolest those first few days when the fermentation is really kicking off and it's generating it's own heat. After that I think you can be a little more lax on the temp. My own theory, I think the yeast is comfortable if we are. Just an idea, maybe tape a thermometer to your bucket or carboy and see how it's doing with wet towels and of course if you've got plenty ice why not chuck a block in there in just in the the afternoon when it's hottest..Suck em' up...Your thoughts?


 
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Old 04-13-2011, 06:57 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kam View Post
Alohas C-Rider,
I'm over here on the Big Island at about 2500' elevation so temperature is pretty good for brewing. Typically 70-75 day and 60-65 night. I usually keep my primary start in my inside pantry (stays about 68 around the clock). Once the biggest of the fermenting (bubbling) stops I bring out to the garage, cover the pail with a towel to keep the light off it for the rest of the time (temp goes from 65-78) if it goes hotter than that I crack some windows. I try to keep it under 78. Seems to be working good so far. I think I saw a pic of your setup here somewhere and seems you're doing the most reasonable thing. After 3 or 4 days you may be able to just get away with water and wet towels, let evaporation do it's cooling thing and maybe just as important make sure its always shaded. The airflow in the open area you have will help a lot. For me (and I'm fairly new to this) I think its most important to keep it coolest those first few days when the fermentation is really kicking off and it's generating it's own heat. After that I think you can be a little more lax on the temp. My own theory, I think the yeast is comfortable if we are. Just an idea, maybe tape a thermometer to your bucket or carboy and see how it's doing with wet towels and of course if you've got plenty ice why not chuck a block in there in just in the the afternoon when it's hottest..Suck em' up...Your thoughts?
On a clear day the temp on the lanai is pushing 83 right now. Under the deck it's cooler w/a big Kukui Nut tree and the house to shade it. I bought an indoor outdoor thermometer w/3 remotes w/wire probes. I've got them in the bucket as well as in a colman cooler trying to condition at 70. I've got a Johnson controler on order and will use it to keep a small apt refridg at 70 to condition. I've also got some apple cider going in one of the muck buckets, a 1 gal bottle. I"m a happy guy here in Wai`anae. Yea, your much higher. Elevation here is only about 380'
Aloha and good luck brewing.


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Kaiser Ridge Brewing
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Fermenting: Black IPA
Bottled conditioning:
Bottled conditioning Old Glory Stout
Bottled in the refe: American Imperial Stout
Bottled in the refer: Dunkelweizen
Largering in refer: Oktoberfest

.

 
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