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Old 04-05-2011, 06:49 PM   #1
Priemus
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Default Sulfur dioxide in Apricots.

Hi, was planning to make an Apricot wheat last weekend, fortunatly my grain "didnt" arrive as planned

Problem is that I was planning on using some preserved Apricots (semi dried) rehydrating them, bledning them, heating them, then adding to the fermenter.

I read in forums a few threads about the possible problem with Sulfer dioxide causing problems with the beer, lots of people that did it and were worried, but noone came back to the threads and said what happened in the end.

Did it need more time fermenting?
Did the S02 kill the yeast?
Did it taste like farts?

Im interested to know whats going on with that before I possibly ruin a batch of beer

so, whats the deal? bad thing to put in beer?


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Old 04-05-2011, 07:32 PM   #2
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Default Some Information provided by Google.

Sulfur dioxide has some degree of inhibitory affect on all yeast; however, the
yeast strains that are used by winemakers for alcoholic fermentation are much more resistant to it than “wild” yeasts are. Wild yeast is the term used for a number of non- Saccharomyces species of ambient yeast that are present on grapes and in the winery cellar.

A molecular SO2 level of 0.4 ppm (equivalent to a free SO2 level of 20 ppm @ 3.50 pH) will kill wild yeast without adversely affecting Saccharomyces.

The inhibitory effect of sulfur dioxide on malolactic fermentation is much greater than it is for the alcoholic fermentation that is performed by Saccharomyces yeast.

Interesting old timers quote regarding cider making:

“Lay brimstone on a rag, and by a wire let it down into the cider vessel, and there fire it; and when the vessel is full of the smoak, the liquor speedily pour’d in, ferments the better”

They used to intentionally add it to Cider to get rid of wild nastrys. No mention of taste

So, Ive figured out on my own that it wont kill my yeast, perhaps stress it a little, but I can deal with that (ill just chuck a bag of bakers yeast in the boil to make em happy).

Would still love to know if there is any adverse sulfur smell or taste to this, or if its something that can be lagered or aged away.


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Old 04-05-2011, 07:45 PM   #3
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I listened to a podcast recently with Shea Comfort talking about the applicability of wine yeasts to beer brewing. He mentioned K1V1116 as producing strong stone-fruit flavors and being able to ferment maltotriose.

It's a "killer" yeast meaning it'll kill any competing yeast, and it's fairly SO2 tolerant.

Don't know if that helps or not, but I intend to try fermenting a wheat wort with it to see if I could make an apricot wheat without any actual fruit.
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Old 04-05-2011, 07:53 PM   #4
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You can also get non-sulfured apricots. They are significantly browner than sulfured ones, but if you are worried about the sulfur, this would be a pretty easy solution.
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:02 PM   #5
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Frankly, if noone can tell me for sure that they have used SO2 apricots and the beer turned out bad Im gonna do it just so we can find out for sure.

Assuming the sulfer smell ferments off/out if its present "at all", then we will know for future reference if its a good idea.

Also just read that if you boil, rinse, boil them a few times you can remove the bulk of the so2. That was advise for people with sulfar allergy. So ill just do that with em as a percaution.

That rinse process, plus a sacrificial bag of bakers yeast in the boil. How bad could it be?
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Old 04-11-2011, 04:27 AM   #6
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And, what was the outcome? This thread is dead for a while but I am hoping for the OP to be reading this still.
I am sitting here putting a recipe together for a wheat with apricots, and I have also a bag here of 1 lbs dried apricots with sulfur dioxide from Trader Joes.
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Old 04-11-2011, 02:59 PM   #7
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Your not going to know for another week minimum how its going

But I will update when I know.
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Old 04-11-2011, 04:10 PM   #8
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Oh sorry I was looking at the join date instead of when you posted! I did not mean to say that about the dead thread. Thanks for replying, Ill wait until you post
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Old 04-11-2011, 05:48 PM   #9
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Im not offended or anything

But, FYI Im using them in secondary now instead of boil. I have the wit in primary right now, and for 3 days already. After another week or so, depending on how it tastes Ill rack on the fruit for another week.

Im preparing the Apricots by rinsing them 2 or 3 times in Hot, but not boiling water. Rumours are that might remove some of the So2.

Im then going to blend them with a little water and use that slurry, combined with a pack of yeast nutrient in the secondary.

I suspect it will be fine, but your not going to know for i estimate another month with any certainty.

Hope you can wait, if not you have my prep there
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Old 04-11-2011, 06:31 PM   #10
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Thanks for the info Priemus. I just downloaded a paper from Journal of Food Science where they incubate dried apricots in H2O2 (peroxide) at different temps. if you pm me your email address Ill forward you the PDF. I dont know if it is that useful, the conclusions were so-so but it does eliminate substantial amounts of SO2. You could add some to one of your water rinses, if you think it would be useful. H2O2 should be available at the local chemist/pharmacy. I just found it by googling a bit. Let me know if you are interested (you might already have prepped them or decide not do) but it might be nice info to have anyways.
-J


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