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Old 03-05-2007, 07:52 PM   #21
abracadabra
 
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For anyone interested here's an informative web site. It talks about the various kinds of filters how they work and even has a link to you tube showing how to build your own. From common items like cotton, activated carbon for an aquarium and a plastic bottle.


http://heartspring.net/water_filters_guide.html#ceramic


Also here's a small commercial filter that contain impregnanted silver a natural bacteriastat

http://doultonusa.com/commercial_ind...er_filters.htm
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Old 03-05-2007, 10:15 PM   #22

Sorry Guys - I'm home sick today. I had a fever going... I was babling away... mindlessly...

I think what I wanted to say was this. The more pure the water is the greater the risk to bacterial infection. Especially if its idle.

So without proper maintenance you can get infected water quite easily.
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Old 03-29-2007, 09:21 PM   #23
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Generally speaking, you should start with good tasting hard water for making beer. There is a whole laundry list of minerals that different yeasts need to survive so you need hard water. If your water comes from a lake, you may need to add gypsum. When I brew, I draw all the water (our town has hard well water) I will be using the night before and let the water sit overnight in open containers to allow any chemicals that the city adds to evaporate out. I also get the PH right by adding about 5 ML of Phosphoric acid to the 6 gallons of water and using PH sticks to check the results and make adjustments. At this point you donít need to worry about bacteria because you will be boiling the water for at least 1 hour and nothing will live through that. Happy brewing!!

 
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Old 03-30-2007, 01:56 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cefmel
Generally speaking, you should start with good tasting hard water for making beer. There is a whole laundry list of minerals that different yeasts need to survive so you need hard water. If your water comes from a lake, you may need to add gypsum. When I brew, I draw all the water (our town has hard well water) I will be using the night before and let the water sit overnight in open containers to allow any chemicals that the city adds to evaporate out. I also get the PH right by adding about 5 ML of Phosphoric acid to the 6 gallons of water and using PH sticks to check the results and make adjustments. At this point you donít need to worry about bacteria because you will be boiling the water for at least 1 hour and nothing will live through that. Happy brewing!!
OK - so I am at a loss as to which way to go here - I've been using bottled spring water for the mash, and I pre-boil my tap water (city) for the sparge water - I do this first, then let it cool while doing everything else.
My water is city water, but very soft.

My water tastes OK, but it does contain chlorine/chlorimines. A filter would be more convienent (sp?) but not if it is going to harbor bacteria. To filter or not to filter, that is the question.

 
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Old 03-30-2007, 02:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MA_Brewer
OK - so I am at a loss as to which way to go here - I've been using bottled spring water for the mash, and I pre-boil my tap water (city) for the sparge water - I do this first, then let it cool while doing everything else.
My water is city water, but very soft.

My water tastes OK, but it does contain chlorine/chlorimines. A filter would be more convienent (sp?) but not if it is going to harbor bacteria. To filter or not to filter, that is the question.
You know, someone mentioned the aquarium chemicals that remove the chloramine - and I saw them at WalMart but didn't dare to trust an associate there to know if there are any other additives in that aquarium stuff that would mess with my beer. So I just used bottled water -- half of it distilled, half of it spring water (would have bought all spring water but they ran out) last time I brewed.
I thought I had an off taste in my first batch and wife said it was a bit of a chloraseptic taste (I thought it was funny she said that, I didn't perceive it, but I had read about it and she hadn't). Anyway, then I looked it up and my town uses chloramine which causes that chloraseptic taste in beer.
I think someone also said you can use camden tablets to remove chloramine, too.
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