Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Aged Cider in Bourbon barrel
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-04-2011, 10:44 PM   #1
timotb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 64
Likes Given: 1

Default Aged Cider in Bourbon barrel

Im wondering if there could be any flavor advantage to aging cider (applewine) in a Bourbon barrel? Any thoughts?


timotb is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 12:57 AM   #2
naeco
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 165
Default

I had a beer this weekend called Innis & Gunn that was ages in oak rum cast and it was fantastic. Being a HUGE bourbon fan I'm pretty sure a totally dry cider ages in bourbon cask would be killer. If you have access to such cask, I say you should definitely give it a try.


__________________
Making cider is easy. Making great cider is tricky.
naeco is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 02:43 AM   #3
timotb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 64
Likes Given: 1

Default

Im seriously considering buying a 53 gallon bourbon barrel and doing this in the fall....I would like to read up on how to properly do this. I'm not finding any "how to" guides on the net, just a lot of forum chatter guessing how. I wish someone could commend some specific reading on the matter. Yeah, I agree making cider is easy, but making great cider is a challenge.
timotb is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 12:22 PM   #4
GinKings
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bridgewater, NJ
Posts: 588
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts

Default

My club has made a few barrel-aged ciders that came out very well. We used Lairds Applejack barrels, which were previously bourbon barrels. We didn't think a dry, crisp, low ABV cider would work well with the barrel, so we made a New England style cider using brown sugar and raisins. We fermented it for about a month before transferring to the oak barrels for 4-5 months. I know some serious cidermakers in MA that make a barrel cider every year. They take a more traditional approach. They ferment right in the bourbon barrel. After fermentation, they top off with fresh cider. Then, leave it on the lees, in the barrel, until bottling time. I believe they usually wait about 6 months, but have waited 1-2 years for some.

The barrel can overpower the cider. I would suggest using a wine thief and sampling every month or so.
GinKings is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 01:23 PM   #5
chromedome
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 35
Default

Jack Daniels sells wood chips, for smoking food, that are made from the old oak whiskey barrels. I wonder if you could get the same effect by adding some to each bottle .
chromedome is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 06:07 PM   #6
DrJerryrigger
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: mass
Posts: 3,213
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Oh My God, you just made me really thirsty!
That sounds amazing. I've never made a cider, or any wood aged beverage, but I need to try this.

I don't think there is really a well known "right way" to do this. Just put it in the barrel and take it out when it's good.
You can use chips in a bottle/jug/carboy rather than the barrel if you don't want to make a hogs-head (what's that in liters?) of cider. They sell chips at many wine making supply stores, though the price is stupid for a little wood. I think if/when I try this I'll start with a tree and a chainsaw. It may add something good if the wood is saturated with whiskey.
Okay, so while writing this I've come up with a plan:
Make some oak chips
Fill a jug with said chips
Fill said jug with Johny Walker Red (any whiskey would work)
Ferment cider
Drink the Johny Walker (now that it's black label)
Use wood chip jug as secondary
Maybe transfer some chips in to bottles (just strain before drinking)
DrJerryrigger is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 07:10 PM   #7
punkin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: sydney, nsw
Posts: 27
Liked 5 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Oak sticks work much better than chips for ageing and imparting flavour.

Sticks should be about 1/2" square by about 6" long.

Barrels (and hence sticks) for ageing spirits are 'heavy toast' to 'char'.

Best and cheapest way to do em is to buy a half barrell planter wine or bourbon barrell and bust it into staves. Use a belt sander or saw to cut the dirty outside wood of and give the inside wine stain a light sand down too.
Cut and split sticks to desired size using a hatchet or saw.

To toast, wrap a dozen or twenty sticks in two layers in foil to seal and roast in the oven/gas bbq ect at 220C for 2 hours.
Check and when they are a dark chocolate colour they are ready.

Some pepople char them over a flame till they are aligator char for ageing store bought bourbon further, but other spirits should be a chocolate toast.

They'd be good for your cider after ageing once or twice for your store bought spirits. A white dog like Georgia Moon would be aged this way for about 8-16 weeks on about 5 sticks to the gallon.

Suggest a lot less for cider.
punkin is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2011, 08:03 PM   #8
Gremlyn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,524
Liked 28 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I found a cidery in England that uses barrels: http://www.newforestcider.co.uk/how_cider_is_made.html
If I'm in that area when I go in May, I will definitely be stopping by. Not sure how common a practice it is, but I bet it'd be good.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I'm a fan of "getting it in the can"!
Gremlyn is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 03:01 PM   #9
timotb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 64
Likes Given: 1

Default

Ive thought about the wood chip idea. Much cheaper than buying a full barrel. I was thinking about aging the cider for several years in the barrel. I would figure age and the bourbon barrel would only enhance flavor over time. I read most people limit the aging to just a few weeks...not sure why.

Using my limited 4 year experience with making cider I would ferment to dry in regular carboys giving a final ABV 10-12%, then load in a used bourbon 53 gallon barrel for the long aging process without any additives. A "select" bourbon barrel is about $160 before shipping from a firm in Danville KY

My desired end result is a bourbon flavor that mellows with time. I hope these barrels remain air tight. No carbonation that I normally would get by force using Cornelius kegs. When I do start to tap the keg, isn't air/oxygen going to enter and spoil it over time?
timotb is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2011, 04:15 PM   #10
dinnerstick
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,014
Liked 261 Times on 193 Posts
Likes Given: 25

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gremlyn1 View Post
I found a cidery in England that uses barrels: http://www.newforestcider.co.uk/how_cider_is_made.html
If I'm in that area when I go in May, I will definitely be stopping by. Not sure how common a practice it is, but I bet it'd be good.
it's very common especially in the old school cideries in the west country (ie southwest england- mostly somerset, gloucester, also herefordshire and worcestershire in the west). i have also always wondered how giant tapped barrels don't oxidize - it's not like they are pumping co2 or inert gas in to replace displaced liquid... but i have always consumed too much to remember to ask

anyone know?


dinnerstick is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
must my cider be aged? adanac58 Cider Forum 4 11-27-2010 05:05 AM
One year aged Cider Carbonation brewbond Cider Forum 3 11-09-2010 12:17 AM
Oak Aged Cider mr_goodwrench Cider Forum 4 09-30-2010 01:39 AM
long aged Cider RugenBrau Cider Forum 6 09-14-2010 05:42 PM
aged cider...bottling for carbonation? corvus Cider Forum 5 09-30-2006 02:49 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS