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Old 03-28-2011, 06:11 PM   #11
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Fermentation temps for me. I am thinking about getting an O2 stone simply because it would be easier than shaking. Probably will once I get my ferm chamber put together and a couple of other odds and ends finished up.



 
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Old 03-28-2011, 06:14 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Homercidal View Post
Fermentation temps for me. I am thinking about getting an O2 stone simply because it would be easier than shaking. Probably will once I get my ferm chamber put together and a couple of other odds and ends finished up.
O2 stone made a big difference for me as well. Fermentation taking off within a few hours. Except for this weekend for some reason........



In the 2 minutes it takes to fill the bucket.


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Old 03-28-2011, 06:22 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by carrotmalt View Post
I only ask because most of what I've read is that trub and hop debree in the fermenter doesn't matter much. I ferment the entire thing and clarity in the end is never an issue, so I'm interested to hear if you actually got a better tasting product with this change.
Trub contains fatty acids that promote staleing and oxydation of the finished beer. Some cold break is actually good for fermentation, but try to remove most of hot break you can.
Of course your mileage may vary
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Old 03-29-2011, 02:52 AM   #14
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Reading this thread just made me really happy. My oxygen system just arrived from Williams last week. I can't wait to make my first properly oxygenated batch.

 
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Old 03-30-2011, 01:58 AM   #15
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To the OP, it sounds like I'm at about the same point in my brew journey as you and considering an oxygenation system for one of my next upgrades. I realize you just posted this yesterday but I'd be interested to hear if your oxygen improvement findings continue with future batches; please keep us posted (and you too BmillaTheBrewzilla now that you have one too!)

 
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:25 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Krrazy View Post
To the OP, it sounds like I'm at about the same point in my brew journey as you and considering an oxygenation system for one of my next upgrades. I realize you just posted this yesterday but I'd be interested to hear if your oxygen improvement findings continue with future batches; please keep us posted (and you too BmillaTheBrewzilla now that you have one too!)
+1 The OP really has me rethinking my stirring/splashing procedures and wondering how much better my results might be with pure O2.
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Old 03-30-2011, 01:30 PM   #17
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I will be following up for sure. Sadly, my next batch is still some time away. I will be making a Cal Common (first brew of that style) and I havn't even ordered the yeast yet. I won't have an original sample to compare it against (as I did with my Stout) but I'll pick up a 6-pack of Anchor Steam for comparison's sake. The next true test will be the Janet's Brown. It has been my unicorn; I've brewed it about 4 times, and just can't seem to get it right. In fact, everytime I experienced some weird brewing disaster, it was on a batch of Janet's Brown. I've had a 3 hour battle with a stuck sparge on one batch, another batch sat in the carboy for 3 months while I moved into my new house. One had the temp probe fall off the carboy (I've since remedied this with a carboy cap thermowell but still can brag that I invented the Ameri-Belgian Brown). That one resulted in worm food. Finally I brewed one batch with hose water that had a lovely lead taste (also worm food). But the 5th time is the charm, right?

However, my original post has been sitting with me for a few days now. I have been ranting for a while on these boards about what a difference temperature control, pitching rates, and sanitation make. They make your process repeatable by eliminating variables, which is a huge asset. These things are really just common sense, and should certainly trump fancy kettles, or conical fermenters, or RIMS/HERMS for any brewer looking to make upgrades. Adding the oxygen may have just completed the perfect homebrew storm. I believe it was the missing piece.

I don't want this to sound preachy...I just want to emphasize the incredible result I experienced by changing a single variable. If you think about it, it makes complete sense. I believe all commercial breweries have a system for oxygenating their beer, but what % of homebrewers have such a system? Sure, homebrew is great because it is fresher than most things you can buy, and has a certain "pride" taste. However, if in the past, I sat down at my local brewpub, and order their stout (which is a multiple GABF Gold medal winner), it would have blown mine away. As crazy as it seems, adding oxgen, which is a given for a commercial brewery, really closed the gap between a great brew pub beer and a great homebrew.

I look forward to reporting back on my next brew.

Joe

 
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Old 04-13-2011, 04:39 PM   #18
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Just have one (or two) question about adding O2 via a stone... Do you need to do it in the fermenter, or can you do it in the kettle, after it's been chilled, before you run it into the fermenter? I'm planning on making a couple of big brews soon, probably fermenting in kegs, or maybe using my 6 gallon carboy (unsure just yet)... If adding the O2 in the kettle is a viable option, it would eliminate any worry about the wort foaming out of the primary.

I'm giving serious thought to getting the stone setup to oxygenate my wort with even for my next batch. I'm looking to make a blonde ale next, which (I'm thinking) show more evidence of an improved oxygenation process being a solid benefit. After that, I'll be looking at brewing an old ale and English barley wine...

Second question... Would you give a higher OG brew more than 60 seconds on the stone? My old ale should be in the 1.090-1.100 range for it's OG... The barley wine is expected to be in the area of 1.120-1.125...

I probably will pick up the new yeast book, just not sure exactly when.
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Old 04-13-2011, 04:42 PM   #19
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Probably most common to add it once in the fermentor, but some do it with an in-line system. Have not seen it documented as doing it in the BK, but I am sure someone, somewhere does it that way

 
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Old 04-13-2011, 04:47 PM   #20
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I hope so... I was thinking of fermenting a 5 gallon batch in a 1/6 barrel Sanke keg... Unless I can get a 1/4 barrel (or two) before these batches are brewed... Of course, I'll be using a starter for the yeast, so I'll have a decent population going in... Just want to make the batches as best possible, since we're talking about a decent amount of grain being used. Over 1/2 of a sack of base malt between the two...


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Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
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