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Old 03-20-2011, 09:46 PM   #1
flabyboy
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Default Priming the Innkeeper

Anybody willing to share their experience when bottle priming the Innkeeper kit from NB or other types of British Bitters? The priming calculator from TastyBrew.com recommends 0.4 oz of corn sugar for a 5 gallon batch. This freaks me out because I am used to using 3-5 oz with previous batches I have made. This beer is a fairly malty session beer.


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Old 03-20-2011, 09:57 PM   #2
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That sounds insanely low, I don't think I have had a 5 gallon batch that required less then 3 oz of corn suger. Perhaps typo?


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Old 03-20-2011, 09:58 PM   #3
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I just looked at the inn keeper spec sheet and it calls for 2/3 cup. I used that amount with my tap a draft system and definatly over carbed.
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Old 03-20-2011, 10:07 PM   #4
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British Bitters styles require 0.8-1.3 volumes of CO2, which is pretty dang low. I got 1.4 oz of corn sugar when using the 1.3 value. What temp do we use. The highest temp it reached during fermentation. I like to start my beer at the cool end of the optimum yeast temp and then warm it to 70 or so the last few days. Do I use the 64 degree temp or 70 for the calculator?
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Old 03-20-2011, 10:14 PM   #5
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Have you ever had a commercial English Bitter? If so, then why are you freaked out? They're not that carbed...well, when carbing to style, this is how you achieve that. Less sugar, means less farting by the yeast of co2...Nothing to worry about. Carbing to style is fun....What do you think's going to happen, other than having a lightly, and correctly carbed beer.
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Old 03-20-2011, 10:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Have you ever had a commercial English Bitter? If so, then why are you freaked out? They're not that carbed...well, when carbing to style, this is how you achieve that. Less sugar, means less farting by the yeast of co2...Nothing to worry about. Carbing to style is fun....What do you think's going to happen, other than having a lightly, and correctly carbed beer.
I guess what I was worried about was having a super flat beer. I have not had a bitter in quite some time. I know British ales tend to be less carbonated. It just seemed to be such a drastic difference than my other brews. I'll go with it. Do I use the highest temp acheived during active fermentation (64 degrees) or what its sitting at now (70degrees).
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:03 PM   #7
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Use the higher temperature. This is for correcting for how much residual CO2 is idissolved in the beer before priming. Since it is sitting at 70F, that is the temp that
will determine how much CO2 will have been off gased.

Cheers.
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:01 PM   #8
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gunna bottle mine this thursday and i worried about how much priming sugar to use also. anyone have anymore advice?
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ratdog
gunna bottle mine this thursday and i worried about how much priming sugar to use also. anyone have anymore advice?
I ended up using 2 ounces of corn sugar. About half what I normally use. I'm expecting a nice foamy head with low carbonation levels
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:24 PM   #10
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Well...I don't know how this is gunna sound,but here goes. I was working on improving a can kit for a more traditional English pale ale. While it did come out a beautiful amber color,the hop additions (so far),combined with the amount of priming sugar,are making it more like the Salvator Doppel Bock. Very close. So the two styles must be closely related,just different interpretations. Only when I pour the first will I know for sure.


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