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Old 08-20-2012, 09:12 PM   #851
rhamilton
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Sep 2011
Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohanMk1 View Post
Please share some details on the "ghetto sparge"
Lets assume a 5 gallon, 10# grain recipe:

Using 1.25 quarts per pound = 3.125 gallons to mash
Using 1.50 quarts per pound = 3.75 gallons to mash
I go middle of the road and mash with 3.5 gallons.

During the mash, I heat another ~3.5 gallons of water on the kitchen stove to 170 for the sparge.

3.5 gallons (mash volume) + 3.5 (sparge volume) = 7 gallons total. Subtract a gallon for boil off, another gallon for grain absorption, and you get your final volume of 5 gallons. You'll have to adjust for your specific setup but that is the general calculation I go by.

I have seafood basket that came with my pot so I put my BIAB in there. Once I'm happy with the mash, I begin a 10 minute mashout @ 170F. After 10 minutes, I pull the whole seafood basket out and use two pieces of wood to balance the seafood basket over the kettle so it drains down and back into the kettle. I go to the kitchen and grab the water on the stove and slowly pour it into the seafood basket to sparge. The hot sparge water washes through the grain, through the basket, and down back into the kettle -- residual sugars and all. Same principle as a traditional sparge but instead of having pumps and sprayer heads and all that, you just pour the water over the grain by hand. I don't drip it or take my time or anything, just pour it on and let it drain.

Remember how I said ghetto

I started as a no-sparger but like I said, I wasn't happy with my no-sparge BIAB efficiency. It was hitting in the 60% range without the sparge. Adding the sparge (along with some other refinements) brought be up to 75% range. Milling my own grain along with the sparge took me to 85%. While I imagine I could cut the sparge out and still be in the 75%+ range, I'm already used to my 'ghetto sparge' so I still do it for the extra points.
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Old 08-20-2012, 09:19 PM   #852
JohanMk1
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Jul 2012
Kempton Park, South Africa
Posts: 249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhamilton View Post
Lets assume a 5 gallon, 10# grain recipe:

Using 1.25 quarts per pound = 3.125 gallons to mash
Using 1.50 quarts per pound = 3.75 gallons to mash
I go middle of the road and mash with 3.5 gallons.

During the mash, I heat another ~3.5 gallons of water on the kitchen stove to 170 for the sparge.

3.5 gallons (mash volume) + 3.5 (sparge volume) = 7 gallons total. Subtract a gallon for boil off, another gallon for grain absorption, and you get your final volume of 5 gallons. You'll have to adjust for your specific setup but that is the general calculation I go by.

I have seafood basket that came with my pot so I put my BIAB in there. Once I'm happy with the mash, I begin a 10 minute mashout @ 170F. After 10 minutes, I pull the whole seafood basket out and use two pieces of wood to balance the seafood basket over the kettle so it drains down and back into the kettle. I go to the kitchen and grab the water on the stove and slowly pour it into the seafood basket to sparge. The hot sparge water washes through the grain, through the basket, and down back into the kettle -- residual sugars and all. Same principle as a traditional sparge but instead of having pumps and sprayer heads and all that, you just pour the water over the grain by hand. I don't drip it or take my time or anything, just pour it on and let it drain.

Remember how I said ghetto

I started as a no-sparger but like I said, I wasn't happy with my no-sparge BIAB efficiency. It was hitting in the 60% range without the sparge. Adding the sparge (along with some other refinements) brought be up to 75% range. Milling my own grain along with the sparge took me to 85%. While I imagine I could cut the sparge out and still be in the 75%+ range, I'm already used to my 'ghetto sparge' so I still do it for the extra points.
Thanks, that gives me some ideas. As a noob on a tight budget this is exactly the kind of info that should help to get me brewing great beer without spending a fortune.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 07:59 PM   #853
jmd1971
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Feb 2012
Weymouth, MA
Posts: 134
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Why bother with sparging at all?? Kind of defeats the purpose of the ease of BIAB. I've gotten consistent efficiencies in the mid 80's & some as high as 94% with no spare whatsoever. Just mash in, check temp/stir well every 20 mins (add heat if necessary), raise to 168 after 60 mins, lift out grain & let drip, then proceed with boil. Has been perfect in my 7-8 batches. I'd never ever go back to the typical mash/lauter method again. Waste of time & WAY too many headaches. BIAB produces easier, better end beer IMO....

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:12 PM   #854
ArcLight
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May 2011
Millburn, NJ
Posts: 1,385
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>>Why bother with sparging at all??

You can always get additional sugar by sparging.
Sugar will flow more freely at 168, instead of 152.
And the pure water will help the sugar dissolve.

>>Kind of defeats the purpose of the ease of BIAB.

Some feel that way, feel the extra effort of sparging isn't worth it.
To each his own.

For a large grain bill (15+ pounds) I think a sparge might be worth it.
For a smaller grain bill, say 12.5, maybe not.

If you get good efficiency without a sparge, then thats great.
A tight crush is important for BIAB.

As for Ghetto Sparge, I wonder how effective that is for such a large volume of water (3+ gallons). I can see doing it with 1 gallon, after squeezing, then squeezing again. I think teh extra water doesnt do much.

I Sparge in a 8 gallon pot by placing the grain bag in it, with some hot water , and soak it for 10 minutes at 167.

Note - I always let the bag drip for a couple of minutes before any sparging. I also squeeze the bag before and after sparging.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:25 PM   #855
Mysticmead
 
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Jan 2010
Kingston, GA
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just as with a traditional 3 vessel setup... some fly sparge, some batch sparge, others don't sparge at all. BIAB has the flexibility to let people do full volume (no sparge which is what I do), dunk sparge, or pour some hot water through the grains at any rate of speed they way. It also allows for people to squeeze the bag (which I do) or let it drip. In the end you still mashed in a bag and made beer (hopefully a great beer!)

Point is, because one person does it one way and its not how you do it, it doesn't make it wrong. Its just a different way to get to the same end. That would be beer, from grain to glass.

 
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Old 08-26-2012, 08:46 PM   #856
jholen
 
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Nov 2011
Sammamish, WA
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I just have to say.. BIAB'ing with my new Spike Brewing 20 gal pot and Wilser's bag was a true treat yesterday. Much better improvement over my previous equipment.

 
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:20 AM   #857
Antler
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Mar 2011
Carbonear, Nl
Posts: 711
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jholen
I just have to say.. BIAB'ing with my new Spike Brewing 20 gal pot and Wilser's bag was a true treat yesterday. Much better improvement over my previous equipment.
I knows the feeling! My 2nd AG was with a brand new 10g Blichmann and a CustomBIAB grain bag, boy was I excited!

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Old 08-27-2012, 12:08 PM   #858
Fordzilla
 
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Nov 2011
Rochester, NY
Posts: 442
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhamilton

Lets assume a 5 gallon, 10# grain recipe:

Using 1.25 quarts per pound = 3.125 gallons to mash
Using 1.50 quarts per pound = 3.75 gallons to mash
I go middle of the road and mash with 3.5 gallons.

During the mash, I heat another ~3.5 gallons of water on the kitchen stove to 170 for the sparge.

3.5 gallons (mash volume) + 3.5 (sparge volume) = 7 gallons total. Subtract a gallon for boil off, another gallon for grain absorption, and you get your final volume of 5 gallons. You'll have to adjust for your specific setup but that is the general calculation I go by.

I have seafood basket that came with my pot so I put my BIAB in there. Once I'm happy with the mash, I begin a 10 minute mashout @ 170F. After 10 minutes, I pull the whole seafood basket out and use two pieces of wood to balance the seafood basket over the kettle so it drains down and back into the kettle. I go to the kitchen and grab the water on the stove and slowly pour it into the seafood basket to sparge. The hot sparge water washes through the grain, through the basket, and down back into the kettle -- residual sugars and all. Same principle as a traditional sparge but instead of having pumps and sprayer heads and all that, you just pour the water over the grain by hand. I don't drip it or take my time or anything, just pour it on and let it drain.

Remember how I said ghetto

I started as a no-sparger but like I said, I wasn't happy with my no-sparge BIAB efficiency. It was hitting in the 60% range without the sparge. Adding the sparge (along with some other refinements) brought be up to 75% range. Milling my own grain along with the sparge took me to 85%. While I imagine I could cut the sparge out and still be in the 75%+ range, I'm already used to my 'ghetto sparge' so I still do it for the extra points.
How do you prop up the basket? Just lay the wood over top of the pot and set the basket on that? Are you concerned about your water running over the wood?

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:38 AM   #859
inkdbrewer
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Aug 2012
Chestertown, MD
Posts: 20
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This topic has really opened my eyes to just how easy brewing all grain can be. Been brewing extract for the past 9 months and enjoyed it, but wanted more control and understanding of the processes and the privilege to say i truely brewed a beer from scratch. So i finally decided to take the plunge. I just recived my 10 gal kettle and bayou burner, and after a few more pieces to be purchased, i'll be biab-ing. So stoked! Oh, and great tutorial from the OP!

 
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Old 08-31-2012, 03:01 AM   #860
Fordzilla
 
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Nov 2011
Rochester, NY
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Nice! I've been brewing extract for a year, and will be taking the plunge into BIAB next weekend. This method is what convinced me as well. Good luck with your step up.

 
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