BIAB Brewing (with pics) - Page 29 - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > BIAB Brewing > BIAB Brewing (with pics)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-12-2011, 09:03 PM   #281
seabass07
 
seabass07's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2011
Brothell
Posts: 1,321
Liked 158 Times on 113 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticmead View Post
2.5 for the mash thickness is fine.. we're talking BIAB here.. a mash thickness of 3 is considered normal
That was my point. I forgot to quote the post I was responding to. It was this one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tektonjp View Post
This has been bugging me and I finally figured it out, I think. Your water water far too little. BIAB is usually done with all the water used in the mash process, including sparge and water absorbed by the grain. At 4 qts per pound (2 for mash and 2 for sparge), 13.25 lbs of grain requires 13.25 gallons plus another 6.5 qts or so for the grain. That surely affected your efficiency.
__________________
Fermenter 1: Beer
Fermenter 2: Beer
Fermenter 3: Not Beer
Fermenter 4: Beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 05:13 AM   #282
Brewitt
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jun 2011
Encinitas, CA
Posts: 861
Liked 79 Times on 69 Posts


I'm enjoying the discussion. Sorry for the lack of response but I have been out of town and its cumbersome to reply on my phone. All of these topics have been discussed at some length various places. I read quite a bit on the volume and squeezing issues and came to the conclusion that has been expressed here, that its fine to squeeze and that 2.5-3 quarts water per pound is plenty. It is possible that there were clumps but I thought I stirred pretty thoroughly before putting on the lid of my pot and wrapping in towels. I might have profited from a mashout and a sparge. Who knows. I'll just have to try to get both of those things in next time and see how I do. I very busy so I have decided to do a two week primary and a 1 week secondary with dry hops. So still a few days before I take an SG.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2011, 09:34 PM   #283
bowa41
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Northampton, MA
Posts: 11

Wow, this thread was a great resource. On to my questions...

I am moving from solely extract/specialty grains to BIAB. I believe that I have everything down, more or less, except mashing.

In looking through the all grain recipes on here, it seems as though each recipe has its own mash-in temperature. Am I correct in believing that this will vary from recipe-to-recipe, or is this more of a personal preference? If it is, in fact, personal preference, then what are the differences between a higher and lower mash-in temperature?

Second, and a related question, is since the mash-in temperatures seem to vary from recipe-to-recipe, how does one determine what strike temperature that they will need to hit? I realize that this higher strike temperature accounts for the temperature loss when adding the grains, which allows you to get to the mash-in temperature. Is there a general calculation that will help me determine this?

Finally, going through all nearly 30 pages of this thread, I see that there are discrepancies in how long the mash-in should take. If my memory is correct, I have seen mash-in durations varying from 60 to 90 minutes. Is this preference? I assume that the additional time past the 60 minute mash in leads to a higher efficiency?

Whew - sorry for the long-winded post, but any and all help would be great!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 12:53 AM   #284
Mysticmead
 
Mysticmead's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2010
Kingston, GA
Posts: 1,342
Liked 93 Times on 62 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Wow, this thread was a great resource. On to my questions...

I am moving from solely extract/specialty grains to BIAB. I believe that I have everything down, more or less, except mashing.

In looking through the all grain recipes on here, it seems as though each recipe has its own mash-in temperature. Am I correct in believing that this will vary from recipe-to-recipe, or is this more of a personal preference? If it is, in fact, personal preference, then what are the differences between a higher and lower mash-in temperature?
higher mash temps is for a more full bodied beer with less fermentable sugars. A lower mash temp gives more fermentable sugars and a thinner body.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Second, and a related question, is since the mash-in temperatures seem to vary from recipe-to-recipe, how does one determine what strike temperature that they will need to hit? I realize that this higher strike temperature accounts for the temperature loss when adding the grains, which allows you to get to the mash-in temperature. Is there a general calculation that will help me determine this?
most brewing software will have tools to help calculate the strike temp based on grain temp and equipment. after a while you'll learn what you need for your setup

Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Finally, going through all nearly 30 pages of this thread, I see that there are discrepancies in how long the mash-in should take. If my memory is correct, I have seen mash-in durations varying from 60 to 90 minutes. Is this preference? I assume that the additional time past the 60 minute mash in leads to a higher efficiency?

Whew - sorry for the long-winded post, but any and all help would be great!
60 or 90... its really personal preference.. MOST of the conversion takes place in the first 15 to 20 minutes.. I mash for 90 minutes. does it make for higher efficiency? who knows. with BIAB the brew day is going to be pretty short so why worry about a 90 minute mash. Start to clean up for me is about 3.5 hours.. the biggest things to remember are, crush the hell out of the grain.. if you buy it pre-crushed from the LHBS, have them double crush it. the other big thing and most important is.. Have fun.. you're only making beer. people have been doing this for a loooong time. they made beer long before thermometers were invented and before they even knew what yeast was and it still ended up being beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 11:30 AM   #285
johnodon
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Douglassville, PA
Posts: 643
Liked 21 Times on 16 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Second, and a related question, is since the mash-in temperatures seem to vary from recipe-to-recipe, how does one determine what strike temperature that they will need to hit? I realize that this higher strike temperature accounts for the temperature loss when adding the grains, which allows you to get to the mash-in temperature. Is there a general calculation that will help me determine this?
I really cannot explain why, but I have found that I can dough-in right at my desired mash temp or 1 degree higher. When I used a converted cooler mash tun, my strike water needed to be 5 - 6 degrees higher. Seven, who started this thread, has actually said that he/she doughs-in at a lower temp and then raises it to the desired mash temp. I haven't had teh balls to try this yet.

Also, this is another reason I love electric brewing. Even if I do dough-in at mash temp and the temp falls a few degrees, the element brings it back to where it needs to be without any intervention from me.

John
__________________
...I'm back baby!!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 02:22 PM   #286
bowa41
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Northampton, MA
Posts: 11

Would there be any detriment to adding your grains at X* (some temperature lower than your mash temperature), and keeping the heat on until you get up to your desired mash temperature? In other words, is there any real purpose in even calculating out and utilizing a strike temperature?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 03:02 PM   #287
johnodon
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Douglassville, PA
Posts: 643
Liked 21 Times on 16 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Would there be any detriment to adding your grains at X* (some temperature lower than your mash temperature), and keeping the heat on until you get up to your desired mash temperature? In other words, is there any real purpose in even calculating out and utilizing a strike temperature?
None at all. Actually, this is the preferred method for any beer that has wheat. Do a search for "step mashing".

John
__________________
...I'm back baby!!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 03:07 PM   #288
Seven
Recipes 
 
Jan 2011
Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,538
Liked 171 Times on 82 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bowa41 View Post
Would there be any detriment to adding your grains at X* (some temperature lower than your mash temperature), and keeping the heat on until you get up to your desired mash temperature? In other words, is there any real purpose in even calculating out and utilizing a strike temperature?
Here's what I've been doing lately: (credit to jeffmeh for sharing this technique)
  • Add the grains at about 140-degrees F.
  • Stir aggressively to get the temp uniform throughout the mash
  • Bring the temp up to 145-degrees
  • Cut the heat, cover, and check the temp again after 5-minutes
  • Add a bit more heat if necessary to reach target mash temp
The temp will continue to rise even after you turn off the burner. It takes a few minutes for heat to distribute evenly throughout the mash and the above method usually gets me dead-on with my desired mash temps.

I also like to check the temp again about half-way through the mash time to ensure I'm still at the right temp.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 03:23 PM   #289
johnodon
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Douglassville, PA
Posts: 643
Liked 21 Times on 16 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven View Post
will continue to rise even after you turn off the burner.
I just want to make the point one more time that I have not seen this with my electric setup. It is set-it-and-forget-it.

Yeah...I'm trying to sell everyone on E-BiaB.

John
__________________
...I'm back baby!!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2011, 03:34 PM   #290
Seven
Recipes 
 
Jan 2011
Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,538
Liked 171 Times on 82 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by johnodon View Post
I just want to make the point one more time that I have not seen this with my electric setup. It is set-it-and-forget-it.

Yeah...I'm trying to sell everyone on E-BiaB.

John
Cool. I have a sankey keg that I have been meaning to convert into something useful some day... maybe eBIAB ???

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another first BIAB stunsm BIAB Brewing 12 03-17-2013 09:35 PM
Anyone BIAB? ultravista All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 72 08-31-2012 12:50 AM
1st AG, 1st BIAB results w/ pics mattmcl All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 09-13-2011 01:48 AM
A nice Podcast on BIAB from one of the Pioneers of BIAB gunner65 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 0 02-26-2011 01:24 AM
Brew day - brewing a duvel clone! (pics attached) Steve973 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 01-22-2007 02:29 PM


Forum Jump