Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > bottle bombs!!!!
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-16-2011, 09:13 PM   #1
irishmike
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: virginia beach, va
Posts: 3
Default bottle bombs!!!!

hey all:
first time out to make some nice homebrew and i decided on cider to start with. wound up with a very pleasant, very clear sweet yet boozy cider. then i blew it the hell up. heres what i did:

-2x1gal bottles of cheap apple juice from walmart.
-add 1cup white sugar to each gal
-bung and airlock will fit right into the open bottle top
-fermented 2 weeks with red star champ yeast (will switch to nottingham ale yeast next time after my reading here)
-racked into secondary and let sit for 3ish weeks, had a terrible sulfery smell/taste when i took a sample from racking
-after 3ish weeks the sulfer seemed to be gone so i added potassium sorbate from local homebrew shop and let sit another week
-cider cleared into a nice light amber color but was very dry and boozy as hell so i added some apple juice concentrate
-tasted and looked great so i poured into 22oz bottles and secured with crown caps, (no priming sugar) wife wanted still cider.

this stuff was awesome, at lease for a first timer i thought. first clue i missed was that upon opening a bottle with dinner, it was really fizzy, i had to pour it, let it sit for a while before i could come back to finish filling the glass. but like a super newbie i just thought it was cool and gave no thought to what was going on in my precious bottles. two days later- boom!!!! all the rest i had sitting on the kitchen floor beside the fridge went off within a few minutes of each other.

my question: what did i do wrong?
what should i change?( i plan on using real pressed apple juice in the future but wanted to go cheap as im starting out)

i have 5gals made in the same fassion that i need to start thinking about bottling soon.....
any help would be greatly appreciated, m.

ps, i was out of town in toronto when the bottles blew and my wife informed me, thus please dont worry about me i didnt need to clean any of the mess up and have come through this ordeal with a minimum of psychological scarring.


irishmike is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:18 PM   #2
leviticus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Atlanta - Decatur, GA
Posts: 116
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I can't claim to not be a nube, but I've been lurking on here long enough to feel I deserve to take a swing at this one...

Did you take gravity readings at all? Very curious what the Original Gravity & gravity when you cleared & bottled was... if I had to guess, this is one factor: you weren't fermented all the way out.

Aside from that, I'm guess you did more than prime your bottles, you doubled their fermentables by adding that apple juice concentrate... Again, speaking of gravities.. it would have been critical to take one before & after that addition to know how much fermentable content it added.

I'm leaning more toward that apple juice concentrate more than the final gravity reading though.


leviticus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:26 PM   #3
Flomaster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Orange, Ca
Posts: 2,151
Liked 38 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

adding the concentrate aka more sugar and then bottling them did exactly what priming sugar would have done, you added to much sugar thus creating your bottle bombs

-=Jason=-
Flomaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 10:53 PM   #4
irishmike
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: virginia beach, va
Posts: 3
Default

Thanks guys. Here's the thing though: shouldn't the potassium sorbate have killed off all of the yeast? My initial problem was that when I tried to backsweeten it would take off fermenting again. Because I used that damn campagne yeast with such a high tolerance for abv it just kept on going. The lady at my local homebrew shop sold me this stuff and said it would kill the yeast and then I could sweeten away without worry of renewed ferm. Was she wrong? What's this cold crashing I've been hearing mention of and do I need to do this? Thanks for the replies fellas and no I haven't yet started taking gravity readings but plan to start when I get the basics figured out.
irishmike is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 11:12 PM   #5
Chris1272
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Auburn, AL
Posts: 213
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

from the wiki on potassium sorbate. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_sorbate
"Also known as "wine stabilizer", potassium sorbate produces sorbic acid when added to wine. It serves two purposes. When active fermentation has ceased and the wine is racked for the final time after clearing, potassium sorbate will render any surviving yeast incapable of multiplying. Yeast living at that moment can continue fermenting any residual sugar into CO2 and alcohol, but when they die no new yeast will be present to cause future fermentation. When a wine is sweetened before bottling, potassium sorbate is used to prevent refermentation when used in conjunction with potassium metabisulfite. It is primarily used with sweet wines, sparkling wines, and some hard ciders but may be added to table wines which exhibit difficulty in maintaining clarity after fining"

basically if you still had live yeast when you bottled then they can still produce CO2. Aslo it depends on how much you put in your cider. if you do this again use with potassium metabysulfite and after adding the two let it sit for 2 or so weeks before you add a the concentrate , this will accomplish two things 1 give the yeast time to die off 2 you will get a clearer cider. after you add the concentrate i would let it sit another week to make sure fermentation has not started up again. hope that answers your questions
Chris1272 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 11:21 PM   #6
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: UP of Michigan
Posts: 65,394
Liked 6031 Times on 4300 Posts
Likes Given: 1553

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by irishmike View Post
Thanks guys. Here's the thing though: shouldn't the potassium sorbate have killed off all of the yeast? My initial problem was that when I tried to backsweeten it would take off fermenting again. Because I used that damn campagne yeast with such a high tolerance for abv it just kept on going. The lady at my local homebrew shop sold me this stuff and said it would kill the yeast and then I could sweeten away without worry of renewed ferm. Was she wrong? What's this cold crashing I've been hearing mention of and do I need to do this? Thanks for the replies fellas and no I haven't yet started taking gravity readings but plan to start when I get the basics figured out.
Sorbate doesn't kill yeast. It inhibits yeast reproduction. It works great, but it's generally used after several rackings and after the cider/wine has been long clear and no longer dropping any lees. If you still have tons of yeast in the cider, it won't need to reproduce to restart fermentation and you'll have bottle bombs.

The other thing to note- sorbate works better in the presence of sulfites. So when you try this again, use one campden tablet per gallon along with the sorbate.

Next time, use gravity readings and far more time. It takes a while for the cider to have most of the yeast fall out, but sticking it in the fridge after it's finished can help move it along faster. The only way to know if it's indeed done is through using a hydrometer.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Follow me on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 07:20 PM   #7
CidahMastah
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , New York
Posts: 4,266
Liked 39 Times on 37 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

So next time:

1. cold crash your cider 24/48hrs
2. sorbate in your bottling bucket and add the cider.
3. Add sweeteners to taste
4. sulfite at 30PPM (1 camden per gallon) Sulfite after you sweeten since the sulfites will change the flavor of the cider temporarily (once bottled this flavor will go away).
5. Bottle

Unless you have a kegging setup, this method will yield you a sweetened still cider (so don't put priming sugar in there too).

Cold Crashing: chilling your cider to less than say 50F so the live and active suspended yeast go dormant and drop to the bottom of your cider. Then when you rack off your cider into the bottling bucket you leave a majority of the yeast behind.
__________________
Man,... That's a lotta hooch!
Steel rig in progress
ebuild info
CidahMastah is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2011, 01:31 PM   #8
Teromous
Beer Gnome
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Teromous's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 2,866
Liked 512 Times on 277 Posts
Likes Given: 59

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by irishmike View Post
I haven't yet started taking gravity readings
I think you've solved your problem right there. Making cider is a very easy thing to do and people are the ones who complicate it. The key is patience and doing things the right way. You really don't need to add anything except the juice and water (and in this case sugar) then wait for the cider to dry out at a low gravity and then it will be safe for bottling.
Teromous is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2011, 02:15 PM   #9
Lunarpancake
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Monmouth County NJ
Posts: 417
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

you can also pasteurize your finished product. It may be easier than worrying about tablets and if there is any leftover yeasts still alive. You just heat the cider to a certain temp for 10min and you are done. All leftover yeast will be dead.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/easy...g-pics-193295/
Lunarpancake is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2011, 06:09 AM   #10
drj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lakewood, WA
Posts: 15
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'm guessing the back-sweetening with additional apple juice. As a chemist I can confirm the other's postings about sorbate. You can overpower "sorbate preserved" juices by adding two packets of Red Star per 5 gallons and still get a good ferment if you only have access to sorbated juice. Used this technique to make a hard sassafras cider using commercial sassafras tea extract.

When my cider is too dry, I back-sweeten with Splenda (pricey) or lactose (much cheaper but you have to worry about lactose-intolerant drinkers) that yeast won't process. Only time that I had bottle bombs was when I primed in the bottle instead of by the batch and didn't use this calculator:

http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html



drj is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
stove top pasteurizing FAILED? Bottle Bombs? kketterer Cider Forum 2 10-09-2010 03:43 PM
Apfelwein bottle bombs? BlueSunshine Cider Forum 4 04-18-2010 12:12 AM
Do I have potential bottle bombs? keelanfish Cider Forum 22 12-30-2008 09:58 AM
avoiding bottle bombs? goodbyebluesky82 Cider Forum 5 10-06-2008 05:50 PM
Overstated risk of bottle bombs bluebeer Cider Forum 24 04-27-2008 01:25 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS