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Old 03-07-2011, 01:13 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hatrickwah View Post
I'm hesitant about the element in contact with my wort and the off flavors that could result, from what I've been reading it sounds like the ULWD elements are the best for the least impact. The only other worry I might have is whether or not the 220v element will fit the same hole as the 110v element, it would really suck to have to cut the hole and everything, only to have to redo everything down the road.
I went with ULWD for mine, but from everything I've read on here noone has reported any charring with LWD or even HWD elements when used in a BK.
Just get a 1" NPT element (1 1/4" hole) they'll be interchangeable.

Look at the list of screw-in elements here.. top 4 are 120V:
http://www.plumbingsupply.com/elements.html#tiny


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Old 03-07-2011, 01:41 AM   #12
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Purple, that was a thought I had. I have two 15a circuits for sure in my garage, the dedicated one for my freezer (why I'll never know), they should have spent the money on some 20a circuitry. Only problem will be just that, I don't think 2 15a circuits will be adequate, or will they?


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Old 03-07-2011, 02:05 AM   #13
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Depends on what wattage of elements you go with. You should check the gauge of wire on your outlets in your garage to see if you could go up a breaker and still keep the circuit safe.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:26 AM   #14
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Not sure if anyone answered the original question of how to wire the element: if not here is youir answer, if you already got it disregard

120V hot --> SSR LINE T1 | T2 --> Element T1 | T2 --> 120V Neutral

Ground the whole thing as you normally would. When you go to 220V just swap the line Neutral for the second hot leg.

Two 110V outlets on different poles can give you the 220V but I won't recommend it as you now have two separate voltage sources and independant breakers, I also can't guarantee the grounding or neutral potential acurrately across two separate branch circuits.
As mentioned a 220V element will give you 25% rated power on a 110V circuit, it will also draw half the amperage. The elements are a resistive load (reactance is nearly 0), therefore P = V^2 / R. R is fixed for a given element. Another form of the power equation is P = I • V, where I = V / R. As you can see halving the voltage gives 1/4 power at 1/2 Current.

Hope that is of some utility to you.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:37 AM   #15
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Power = V^2/R

An element rated for a 220 line will run at 1/4 of the power rating if connected to a 120 line. A 4000 Watt 220 element will run at 1000 Watts on a 120 line. The real issue is current. You need to look at your breakers to see how many amps you can run on a line. I think the rule of thumb is to run at 75% of the breaker rating. Someone should be able to verify or correct this.

On a 20 amp breaker:
You want to run at about 15 amps
Power = V*I = 120 * 15 = 1800 Watts
The equivalent 220 line rating would be 1800*4 = 7200 Watts
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:41 AM   #16
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Why F^ck around?! Show me a picture of your panel, and then we will have a correct solution for you.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:57 AM   #17
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A picture of the panel is not going to tell you the gauge of wire running to the outlets in his garage. If you can see the difference in 14ga and 12ga wire through a picture then good job. The only thing a picture will show is if the outlets are on 2 separate phases. You are correct ITSME but why pay for an element that you will only possibly get 25% out of. In the end it may just be cheaper and safer to get a 220 line run.
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Old 03-07-2011, 03:10 AM   #18
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^^
You're missing the point. I am trying to get the guy a 240V and need to know what service size and panel layout + what his other loads are there. THEN, we can come up with a good solution without f^ckin' around by tapping one leg and the other. Do it right.

Sheesh, I see this ALL the time with floor refurbishing companies that try and tap (2) alternate lines and wonder why their sanders fail.
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Old 03-07-2011, 03:11 AM   #19
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Well, at the moment, its 14 ga wire on a 15 amp breaker. I've wanted to upgrade the breaker, but don't dare. I bought this house brand new and never will buy new again. The builder even put my lights on the same gfci as the rest of the 2 whole outlets in my garage. I turn on the vacuum to clean out my MLT and pray that I don't pop the gfci. My wife and I should be moving in the next 2 months, so not going to invest in any improvements on this house anymore. I was just looking to begin going electric because my BK burner is wasting money on me. The plan is to go 220 in the end, so I wouldn't be wasting money on a minimally used element.
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Old 03-07-2011, 03:13 AM   #20
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Here's the box BTW. I can add a whopping one more circuit to it, and that probably would be a bad idea. There's a new meter and additional breakers outside, plus the a/c box that was run direct from the meter.


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