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Old 06-22-2011, 07:36 PM   #11
MichaelsBrewing
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Judges comments? What would you do differently? Have you brewed it again since May 2010?

Thanks and Cheers!
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Old 08-08-2011, 11:50 PM   #12
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Update??
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Old 10-11-2011, 05:35 AM   #13
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Sorry for the lack of updates. I bought a house this summer and it's been non-stop projects ever since.

This beer continues to be hit whenever I share it with friends (been miserly with it since I want to let it age). It's nice and sour and almost has a lambic style taste to it.

I plan to brew it again soon but instead of 10 pounds of sour cherries, I might sub in a couple points of rainier or bing cherries to sweeten it up a bit and up the hops some based on the judges comments (I'll post those when I can find them again).
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Old 06-23-2013, 03:49 PM   #14
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Reviving this, with a few questions about your process. I'm getting 10 lbs of sour cherries from a friend that were freshly picked yesterday and I've been wanting to make this recipe since I got Papazian's book years ago. I want to do it all-grain, as you did Olddog, and I like the look's of the grain bill. My questions are:

-How much volume does 10 lbs of cherries add to the boil kettle?
-Will the temp drop, by adding cherries, from 212 F to 160 F - 180 F with such a larger boil volume than Papazian's recipe calls for?
-What kind of volume into the fermenter should I plan for, assuming I'm shooting for 5 gallons of beer after all transferring has been done (primary -> secondary -> keg)?

I know, questions are way too specific for a thread 2 yrs old. Just thought I'd give it a shot.

Thanks
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Old 08-18-2013, 11:40 PM   #15
RitalinIV
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FreshBrew,

I just started on this recipe 4 days ago and I might be able to help out a little. I am a long time reader and first time poster but here goes-
I started with 3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon kettle. I thought I was going to have an issue with adding 10 pounds of sour cherries, but I was wrong. There was a surprising amount of room left in the kettle, especially after 45 minutes of boiling. I would estimate 7-8 inches after adding cherries. I used cans of Oregon brand tart cherries in water (11 x 14.5 oz), drained, and dumped into a grain bag. I crushed with clean hands.

My wort temp was about 223F at the 45 min mark. I killed the heat and added the bag of cherries mixed with finishing hops. The temp dropped down to 184F. I did not really believe it so I checked my digital with my trusty back-up thermometer. It was accurate. I kept the heat off until the temp dropped down to 165F and then slowly added/removed heat to keep it in range.
When it came time to pour it into the fermenter, I removed the bag of hops and cherries to another kettle. I dumped the hot wort over ice and filled to the 5 gallon line with cool tap water. After stirring, the temp was 85F. Again, I double checked (10 lbs of cherries cost me $45 after all). I simply waited for the temp to drop to 80F and pitched the yeast. After, I added the cherry bag again, sealed it up, and waited.

Fermentation started 48 hrs later (which worried me) but when it did, WOW! I am using a standard, cookie-cutter, brew store-purchased plastic primary and there is plenty of room. I see no issue with using a glass carboy either if that is your thing.

Hope that helps and good luck,

-Ritalin
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Old 07-28-2014, 02:30 PM   #16
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Old 05-01-2015, 10:18 PM   #17
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I think you get more fruit flavor transfer if you add the fruit at the end of fermentation, say in a secondary ferment at the end. The alcohol present kills off any potential invaders and the fruit flavors are not distorted by so much fermentation. Also, you don't have to get your wort chiller all icky.
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